Thursday, July 10, 2008

Homemade Rub, Pork Ribs, and a Rhetorical Question

Is there any greater pleasure than eating perfectly barbecued, melt-in-your-mouth, pork spareribs, sitting on top of a fresh, cold, and crunchy coleslaw? These ribs were generously sprinkled with dry rub, cooked for 8 hours over very slowly-burning mesquite charcoal, and finally, glazed with a thick wash of homemade Kansas City-style barbecue sauce.

Click on the photo to enlarge. Warning:
May cause uncontrollable salivation and intense barbecue cravings.


23 comments:

Betty said...

I had gone off barbeques since learning that the blackened bits cause bowel cancer. But i think a plate of that will make up for a bit of surgery and few rounds of chemo or radio therapy.. :)

Chef John said...

I like your attitude.

milkshake said...

Eating great food actually prevents cancer and diabetes - the moderation is easier when the food tastes (and looks) delicious; you can have one human serving and feel not cheated. Too many people in US were raised on beef/dairy-rich but bland salty and sloppy fare - a diet proper for a farmboy working through the day. (One loads up on mediocre stuff to feel good, then washes it down with soda that has over half a pound of sugar in a 2L bottle)

Oh, and your BBQ ribs are now a background on my monitor, Chef. It will make everybody in our office hungry ;)

Chef John said...

Wow, computer background...that's like the highest honor! i hope after they get hungry they go and check out the site. Thanks!

texichan said...

Mesquite will always and forever be my favorite for barbecuing! Around here we can go gather some fresh mesquite wood and toss it in the pit - maybe I'm a little partial, lol. I haven't had any proper homemade barbecue in a while. I hate being stuck in an apartment without a patio, and stovetop smokers don't do it for me! In the meantime I'll just stare and imagine.

Anonymous said...

i just licked the screen.

[eatingclub] vancouver || js said...

No, no greater pleasure. . .;)

Uncle Dee said...

i am a victim of uncontrollable salivation and intense barbecue craving. bravo, chef john

Annie & Nate said...

8 hours over mesquite! I think that would be too bitter, wouldn't it?

What temperature would you say you were cooking at?

chiff0nade said...

Well, I did as you suggested and clicked on the photo. It did not cause uncontrollable salivation and intense barbecue cravings.

It only made me wish for good barbecue that is NOT ruined by slopping way too much "sauce" or whatever you call it on the wonderful pork ribs.

Of course, that's just my opinion as a professional chef who graduated from Peter Kump's Culinary School in New York.

Chef John said...

I stand corrected... everyone knows the best "Professional" barbecue chef/experts are trained in NYC!

Did Pete have any classes entitled "More Than One Way to Do Things?"

Sometimes I "ruin" my ribs with a sauce glaze, and sometimes I don't "ruin" them. Depends on my mood.

BTW, I love your hat.

Chef John said...

It was a very low temp, probably 225, and they were bitter at all.

msand said...

"Is there any greater pleasure than eating perfectly barbecued, melt-in-your-mouth, pork spareribs, sitting on top of a fresh, cold, and crunchy coleslaw?"

Yes, eating perfectly barbecued, beef ribs. You know, the "Flintstone" size.

Chef John said...

oops, I meant NOT bitter

Chef John said...

yea, i love giant beef ribs too!

bennynac said...

What type of smoker do you have?

Chef John said...

I don't. I just use an old Weber - smoky joe.

Genocide said...

Dear Chef john!
Im writing to you from sweden just to say that we follow your every recipe! Today is my alltime first for making ribs and im going to try your recipe! And i will as always...enjoy=)

Anonymous said...

YUM! Those look just perfect! I like saucy tender amazing ribs.

OldGregg64 said...

Chef John,

I'm looking at the picture and drooling but I do have an observation. The picture looks like baby back ribs to me. Spare ribs and baby backs are two different animals. Well actually the same animal but two different cuts. Spare ribs being the cheaper and more authentic cut of the two. I love baby backs but they are not really "ribs" in the deep south sense of pit BBQ. Poor people cooked the cheepest cuts and pork loin baby back ribs ain't. Spare ribs are. I think that, when done right, spare ribs are better. I am not a chef and I have never been to NYC. However I do know ribs and know how to do baby backs and spare ribs right. I would never use mesquite for pork. Hickory, cherry and apple are better suited to smoked pork. Mesquite is for brisket and all beef cuts.
I love your blog and you have taught me more about cooking than any other website. I hope you are real enough to let the student teach every now and then.

Best Food Wishes to you.

DeTigero said...

i'm sorry, is there a video for this or am I missing something? or having a blonde moment?

Chef John said...

No video on this post. Just a link to dry rub.

MotherSquid said...

Hello Chef John & Company- I'm making your recipe tonight using country style pork ribs. My comment is a reply to the poster referring to grilled foods link to cancer. While I have had cancer twice, I've eaten grilled food in moderation since adulthood.
I come from a family with a background in the grocery business. Mt Father could field dress a calf in minutes by age 12.(Thank goodness we were spared that chore). We grew up eating beef twice a day, following bacon for breakfast. My Grandmother, the youngest of 8 and the only girl, also lived on this meat-centric diet, started smoking non filter menthol cigarettes at age 14. She began drinking bourbon daily about age 17. The only vegetables she ate
were canned peas, mashed potatoes& iceberg lettuce. She loved her chocolate & ate 1.5 pounds of Russell Stover chocolates every week along with her near nightly ice cream yet she never weighed more than 120 pounds. She loved her Lipton tea, an orange & black pekoe blend, liberally sugared. In light of all her bad eating habits you'd expect she would have been the one with cancer, but she lived cancer free to the ripe old age of 91. I have been eating a fruit & vegetable rich diet since my teens,have never smoked, and drank just occasionally, and was first diagnosed with cancer at age 37.I went 21 years cancer free, and find myself in treatment for cancer again.
So I'm going to get some cigarettes, bourbon & a big prime rib with mashed potatoes and gravy, followed by a hot fudge sundae, all washed down with some sweet tea.
Thanks for your great recipes!