Friday, July 4, 2008

The Pursuit of Happiness

Thomas Jefferson, who composed the timeless, transcendent text below, was not only a brilliant political philosopher, but also an accomplished farmer, and the country's first real foodie. Even if he hadn’t helped father this country, the fact he invented mac and cheese would have cemented his place in American history.

Whenever I read the preamble to the Declaration of Independence, I can't help wondering how that last sentence would have ended, had Jefferson not been such a passionate gourmet.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

Enjoy the Fourth of July weekend, and all that you pursue.

Photo © Flickr user Aunt Owwee

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

can you make a video on how to make this?

Rachel said...

Wow - is that a cheesecake? Looks fantastic!!
I hope you are enjoying your holiday!

Chef John said...

I believe it's just a boxed white cake, frosting and berries. But, cheesecake would be very nice!

PrimeBrit said...

I really think that is cool whip topped with strawberries and blueberries..?

Chef John said...

maybe, but we still won the revolution. so there. :)

Anonymous said...

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/video_guide/ this is the same thing! sorta but its cheese cake so if anyone wants to see how to make this here it is!

Lucia said...

I haven't found any info about Thomas Jefferson inventing mac and cheese. He is mentioned as a gourmet but no references about the mac and I'm kinda curious. I was wondering where I could read more about that.

Chef John said...

In 1787, Thomas Jefferson, perhaps our country’s greatest Renaissance man, returned to America from his tour as minister to France. He brought back a pasta machine acquired in Italy. He proceeded to invent a better pasta machine, and undoubtedly many recipes as well. In documents in the Library of Congress, one guest reports dining dining on “a pie called macaroni,” an early version of what we know as Baked Macaroni and Cheese. The macaroni was cooked until almost done, then combined with melted butter, salt, and grated white or yellow cheese and put it in the oven for 15 minutes or more.

Chef John said...

oops! I forgot to credit thenibble.com for the quote above.

tiff :) said...

isn't this from kraft kitchen???

tiff :) said...

isn't this from kraft kitchen???