Thursday, December 18, 2008

Chicken Cacciatore - The Official Recipe of Bad Italian Hunters

For decades I've made and enjoyed chicken cacciatore without ever realizing what a terrible name it has. Chicken cacciatore basically translates to "hunters-style chicken." So, what's wrong with that you say? What kind of lame-ass hunter settles for chicken??

Are you telling me the proud, cunning hunters of Italy have allowed their official dish to use chicken as the main ingredient? Where's the dangerous wild boar? How about hard-to-shoot pheasant? I mean how hard is it to hunt chicken? My hunting skills are only slightly better than Paris Hilton, yet I could shoot a damn chicken.

Sorry to have to call you out, Italy. Don't feel too bad; you still have your cooks, artists, lovers, and opera singers to be proud of. All that being said, chicken cacciatore is a very delicious dish, and this video recipe shows my favorite version. Enjoy!



Ingredients:
2 tbsp olive oil
1 whole roasting chicken, cut in quarters
salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
1 large onion, sliced (so they hold together, slice the onions "with the grain" in the same direction as the lines of the onion, instead of across the onion like they are usually sliced)
8 oz fresh mushrooms, quartered
4 cloves garlic, sliced
3 springs rosemary
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp red pepper flakes, or to taste
1 cup tomato sauce
1/2 cup water
2 red bell peppers, sliced
2 green bell peppers, sliced


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26 comments:

Hugolin said...

Vive Chef John!
Chef John président!
Bravo et merci!

Scott - Boston said...

Dick Cheney's favorite dish!

Scott - Boston

TREECOCK said...

I want some in my mouth

Chef John said...

Yeah I should have referenced Cheney instead of Paris, damn.

Anonymous said...

very nice easy beautiful recipe, thanks!

Greg said...

Yeah, you guys laugh but a wounded chicken is a dangerous foe.

Right up there with the Legendary Black Beast of Aaaaarrrrrgggggghhhhhh...

Susanna said...

"with the grain" vs "across the grain", sliced garlic vs chopped/crushed garlic; is there a taste difference in the end result?
If not (which I suspect there isn't), why one way and not the other?

*SpArKy* said...

First, I tried making this dish few weeks ago with another recipe....the result was heart burn disaster, I'm gonna have to try your recipe now! Its amazing how you magically guess the recipes that im currently experimenting with......any chance you're gonna do beef stroganoff any time soon?

Also, as the legend goes, if a hunter came home without catching any food, his wife would kill a chicken and make this dish....so in that sense it is the stew of bad hunters, not to mention kinda castrating if you think of the symbolism of that chicken.....

Chef John said...

heartburn is probably from tomatoes and peppers, not the recipe, but good luck. Yes, the metaphorical significance of the name is interesting. Thanks!

Chef John said...

Susanna, onions cut with the grain will not disintegrate and will stay visible. Garlic that's sliced is more mellow that crushed garlic since crushing releases more of the sharp flavor compounds. Thanks

Bill W, NH said...

Got my dvd today. It may have come sooner as I don't check my mail all that often. Thanks Chef.

mattyjl-memories said...

Hi Chef John,

Thanks for this wonderful recipe! It has become my weekly staple weekend meal. Both hubby and I love it! It usually lasts us for 3 meals and I will prepare the first with pasta, 2nd with garlic bread and lastly turning it into omurice (japanese dish - omulette rice).

Cheers,
Cheryl

Chef John said...

thanks, sounds like a great trio!

Irina said...

Just a great dish. Gonna make it again and again. Thank you, chef!

From One Lover to Another said...

I made this dish today for my aunt and grandparents... None of us have ever tasted it before...

*My gpa has Alzheimer's and doesn't really eat much of anything anymore... He used to eat everything and now he is so picky... You would have sworn that food had never even touched his plate, it was so clean... He loved it!*

Anonymous said...

Chef, I found your Cacciatore excellent. I really like your videos, your knowledge and your sense of humor.
I have learned much from you and will just say thanks and Enjoy!!!!
Steve

Anonymous said...

Chef John, if I wanted to double the amount of chicken in the recipe, how much longer would I need to cook the chicken in the oven?

Chef John said...

Sorry, can't tell you, id have to test. Just cook it until it is all done and fork tender! :-)

Anonymous said...

well shizzle....I didn't know I could put my le creuset with the black top handle lid in the oven....

Anonymous said...

Wonderful tasty dish. I like my sauce a little more concentrated so may remove the top at the one hour mark to promote some dehydration.

Anonymous said...

This is so delicious and easy! Thanks for a great recipe, I am an instant fan.

..Maria said...

If Italian "cacciatore" is anything like the spanish "cazadora", I think it was originally made with rabbit... So don't judge those poor italian hunters, it's not their fault that some lazy person started using chicken instead of rabbit!

Anonymous said...

do i realy have to use le creuset? i dont have that.can i use a caserole instead?

Anonymous said...

omg it tastes SSOOOOO GOOOOOOOODDD... how will i ever go back to the simple baked chicken!!?!?!

Steve Gamburg said...

Made this recipe last night - outstanding. Did not have dried oregano so I used Herbes de Provence instead - it worked.
Thanks Chef John.

TBG said...

I gave this a go last night. I was craving some. I didn't have mushrooms on hand and I used boneless skinless chicken tenders but it still turned out great. The chicken was very tender and moist. I also used my cast iron skillet. There wasn't any leftovers. I'll be making this again later this week but with mushrooms.