Wednesday, February 18, 2009

I'm in Corned Beef Hash Heaven

When I'm cooking corned beef, watching it simmer in the aromatic broth, I'll sometimes close my eyes and picture the delicious plate of food I have coming. The funny thing is, it's not the sliced corned beef and cabbage I'm dreaming of, it's the corned beef hash I'm going to be making with the leftovers.

There are certain dishes I would never talk someone into trying, or argue on behalf of its virtues. It's one of those, "there are two kinds of people in the world" things. Either you really love corned beef hash, or you don't eat it. It's not a dish for the indifferent.

Now, that the non-hash people have stopped reading, let's talk crust. As you well know, what separates a great hash from a transcendent hash is the "crust." You can't rush a corned beef hash crust - it's built slowly, over medium heat, with multiple turnings and pressings, the meat and potatoes crisped and caramelized in the combination of butter and beef fat.

I've always felt it's a poached eggs greatest achievement to meet its end on a pile of perfectly crusty corned beef hash. In addition to the textural pleasures, it also features one of the food world's greatest sights - the egg's golden yolk slowly running over and through the steaming hash. They don't know what they're missing. Enjoy!



Ingredients:
1 tbsp butter
1 1/2 pounds cooked corned beef, diced
1 1/2 pounds white potatoes, peeled quartered
1/4 cup prepared roasted tomato salsa
2 clove garlic, crushed
1 bunch green onions, white parts chopped, green parts reserved for garnish
salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste


Here are some more great breakfast video recipe ideas!
Sausage and Egg Pizza
Lemon Soufflé Pancakes
The Hangtown Fry
"Flattata" with Bacon, Potatoes, and Greens
Fancy Restaurant-Style French Toast



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52 comments:

AceTravis said...

This looks amazing! I remember when I was little, my friend's dad used to always eat corned beef hash and I always wondered where the corn was. Lol. Anyway, thank you so much for another amazing recipe. Take care! :)

*SpArKy* said...

what is this "corned beef" stuff? is it spam?

Teresa said...

Mmmm...I'm drooling. Thanks. :)

Pyrofish said...

Did you make your own corned beef Chef John, or did you buy it? I'm planning on making my own soon, and was just wondering.

Corned Beef is a cured beef brisket that first became popular in the Jewish community. If you smoke it and add pepper you have pastrami. It is sometimes mislabeled as Irish because of the "corned beef and cabbage" thing, but that's an American-Irish invention.

Chef John said...

Spam?! Spam? It's a corned beef brisket. Spam? Can someone please explain the difference, I can't do it.

Chef John said...

No, I just used a supermarket special (mmmm...nitrates)

Pyrofish said...

By the way, the "corned" part of the name, refers to the salt. Something to do with Old English...

The one I'm making will also have nitrates. I already have the pink salt and juniper berries, I just need a piece of brisket worth curing. Maybe some grassfed via mailorder is in order. :-)

Natural Eater said...

That looks so awesome! Far and away better than the stuff from a can. :-) I just may have to try making that.

Natural Eater said...

That looks so awesome! Far and away better than the stuff from a can. :-) I just may have to try making that.

childsdish said...

Corned Beef and Cabbage = American-Irish invention, is exactly right. I grew up in an Irish heritage home, one generation from the homeland, and this was never fixed or served. Not sure what Irish cuisine is, but anything with potatoes must be good.

Last night I fixed Pasties. Yummmmm. Just like my Mom used to make for us. These originated in Cornwall, England to serve the coal miners. I grew up in Upper Peninsula Michigan, and we had plenty of coal miners there. We ate pasties often.

Chef John, will you do a demo for making them?

Chef John said...

I just may. Do you know where I can get a good recipe? ;)

Dawn said...

I am a corned beef hash lover. I love love love Irish Eggs Benedict. I could eat hash every morning. Really nice photos here.

Anonymous said...

What fabulous colored yolks! Why dont my organic eggs produce this color? :(

AP

*SpArKy* said...

sorry! I didn't know any better....will google both spam and corned beef.

Granny said...

Oh My God! This looks so good and that egg is cooked to perfection. I used to have this when I was a kid but with that canned stuff. What was my mom thinking. Have to make this soon.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, yeah, the hash looks great and all but listen to this....! I FINALLY found ginger paste in a tube today. I feel like I have been on a quest for months now looking for this elusive product. I found sherry vinegar a couple of months ago. That was really exciting too. So here's the thing... I also found lemongrass in a tube! I want it! I have no idea what to do with it, but feel confident that if anyone can tell me what to use it for, it is Chef John! Still hunting for those little red peppers in a jar but have renewed hope that they are out there somewhere. The quest continues!

Chef John said...

youre timing is impeccable! I will be linking to a green chicken curry soon that uses lemon grass.

Chef John said...

that's good Sparky. You almost got banned from the site! ;)

Chef John said...

Annon, the great color yolks is because these are from a special breed of chicken called gallus domesticus photoshopus

Anonymous said...

Looks GREAT I love hash and eggs! The egg looks delicious, it reminds me of my other favorite breakfast Eggs Benedict (hint hint!).

Anonymous said...

Fantastic! I love chicken curry! I will buy the lemongrass paste. I knew I could count on you. Just remembered the other "elusive ingredient"... San Marzanno tomatoes. The closest I have found said "San Marzanno type tomatoes". I thought that was so funny. It was like saying "you're getting warmer!"

Chef John said...

EB already posted

texichan said...

Ahh! I've only had corned beef so many times - all as a child, in Reuben sandwiches. I never cared for it much. But this looks so delicious... I might have to try again soon. Beef and potatoes with a crusty finish - what's not to like about that?

Anonymous said...

Hey Chef, offtopic but you had that little kid Julians video. Have you seen "little gordon"? A miniature gordon ramsey at littlegordonDOTcom. Funny but also sad that cooking is being linked with cussing and overcriticism.

Anonymous said...

lol.... on breed of chicken ;)

Anonymous said...

Is canned corn beef an acceptable alternative ingredient for this hash? Love the site by the way.

Chef John said...

thanks, and i've never had canned CB, so I can't say. I think I may have a couple cans in my bomb shelter, so maybe I'll try and get back to you.

Anonymous said...

Do you mean the Economy Bomb shelter?

Anonymous said...

how do u fry the egg? please teach me how!!

ghanima said...

Your description of anticipation when making corned beef, awaiting the corned beef hash from leftovers must be analogous to the sensation I get when roasting chicken. My mother was always mortified when I take a chunk of meat of a beautiful, crackling-skinned, freshly roasted bird and make a sandwich. I've always preferred the dishes with a harmonious variety to the ones with a simple protein.

Chef John said...

the egg is poached. check the link in the post.

Sky Peace said...

Gallus domesticus photoshopus. LOL.

Charlemange said...

I bought a beef brisket to make the corned beef. I braised it to tenderness but the meat is more like a soft stew beef than corned beef. I will still use it for this recipe but should I have purchased a chunk of corned beef from the deli or cooked it differently?

Charlemange said...

Okay update. I ate the stew meat and am currently brining the beef brisket. I have never liked corned beef and cabbage so had no idea how to make corned beef.

Chef John said...

there are worse mistakes :)

gina carey said...

i'm such a boring breakfast person (cereal, the occasional pancake). you inspire me to step up my dang game!!

Pam said...

Not really for posting, but I can't find how to email you directly from your blog site.

I live in Michigan and have two "authentic" recipes for pasties. One of them is my Grandmother's (she grew up in the U.P.) and one my former church used when we made pasties as a monthly fund-raiser.

If you're interested, please email me at: pam_nospam at yahoo dott com

Chef John said...

yes, my email is foodwishes@yahoo.com BTW, it's in the contact link in the sidebar menus. thanks!

childsdish said...

Hi Pam,

During part of my childhood I lived in Marquette. I have found dozens of variations on the internet for Pasties, and once in awhile I have found them at specialty restaurants, but seldom have I seen directions for the ones I recall.

Ours were the very simplest method used by the "poor" coal workers wives, and consisted of only meat and potatoes, flavored with onions, salt and pepper, then wrapped, half circle, in dough. We ate ours with catsup to add a little extra flavor. My mom used 1/2 ground beef and 1/2 ground pork.

The ones I've had from restaurants were 'dressed up' with carrots, peas, and sometimes other veggies, and often with cooked meats like roast beef or pork roast. These were served with gravy. I can't imagine a coal worker on his lunch break pouring gravy on his pasty, so I never felt these were authentic.

I have the feeling authentic Pasties are somewhat regional, so different from one place to another. I also believe they are something that is varied according to whatever ingredients someone has on hand, or just prefers. I hope you'll share your version here. I would really like to try it.

Thanks.

Daniel said...

Dear Chef John,
My corned beef hash came out a bit dry and it may be because i cut the layer of fat from the brisket after boiling it? Should the fat layer be left on the brisket?
Thank you,
Daniel

Chef John said...

i always leave a little on, but maybe you boiled it too long? Was it good fresh? CBH is a bit "dry" which is why it's so good with the runny egg. Maybe it was actually OK? Maybe another spoon of salsa? A little more butter?

Ruth said...

Here, in the North East of England we have the Corned Beef and potato pie. It's the simplest yet most delicious recipe I have tried with corned beef yet.

If anyone is interested, it involves:

Boiled potatoes
Boiled Onions (with the potatoes)
Corned Beef
Pastry

You basically boiled the potatoes and onions and mix them in with the corned beef-that's your pie filling. You then make sure that you have an upper crust as well as a lower crust and cook it in the oven for about 40 mins or until the pastry is golden. Moist and divine. Also a typical recipe from the North East of England...just a thought. One of my Foodwishes :)

Anonymous said...

Chef John, this recipe was ridiculously good. Thank you!!!

Blood Red Roses said...

I can't get a "crusty" finish because the corned beef is sticking to the bottom of the pan terribly! (it's canned corned beef) Otherwise I had soft egg top- hash this morning for the first time, and it was heavenly. Now I want this every morning!

Chef John said...

are u using a non-stick pan? That's sort of key, or a well seasoned cast iron one

Chris Ampania said...

dear god this is delicious. After discovering your youtube channel I've made the carnation fudge, corned beef and cabbage, and now the corned beef hash which is by far the best thing i've eaten in a long time. I never would have attempted to make something like this without knowledge of your website or youtube videos, so thanks a lot and keep 'em comin

desertdoll said...

Chef John,
This recipe looks great. What do you use for the "prepared roasted tomato salsa"? Thank you.

Chef John said...

sorry, can't remember the brand... maybe La Victoria?

Anonymous said...

Bumping an old recipe which I just made, but it didn't turn out right.

I bought corned beef, sliced sandwich style, from a deli. I decided to make CB hash following your recipe, but the finished product wasn't what I expected. The potato was fine, but the corned beef had the texture of crispy bacon and required a lot of chewing.

Any ideas?

Tina Kim said...

Oh my gosh, I made this tonight and it was great! The salsa adds an amazing kick to the dish. Will definitely make this again. So quick and easy.

Toshiko Suisei said...

Just had a wonderful St. Patrick's Day breakfast using this recipe! I didn't have the salsa so I used a couple Tbls of tomato sauce and a serious splash of Cholula hot sauce. Was YUM! I was hoping I would have had the luck o'the Irish when I cracked open the egg but alas, there was only one golden yolk in it. Those few bites where the hash was soaked in the warm runny yolk were heavenly. Thank you Chef John! I hope you're enjoying your spring break in AZ :)

CC said...

Chef John,
I prepare my salsa in a skillet with lid. I pour each egg on top of the salsa and cover until eggs are almost done, then I sprinkle cheese over the eggs. This method allows me to prepare multiple eggs at a time.
CC