Monday, July 20, 2009

Cooking Grass-Fed Beef: Episode 2 – New York Strip Steak with Warm Caramelized Mushroom Salad

This video recipe for New York Strip Steak with Warm Caramelized Mushroom Salad is the second in a series of videos I'm doing that focus on cooking various cuts of grass-fed beef.

The New York Strip is a very popular, easy-to-prepare cut, and the most popular steak in America (with the higher-fat Rib Eye coming in a close second and gaining fast).

While I prefer to grill Rib Eye steaks, with the New York Strip, I think a simple pan searing is best.
These grass-fed steaks come from Normanton Farms, and were about 8-oz each. This is sort of a standard size for this cut, unless you're talking about a steakhouse portion, which are usually 12 to 16-oz. Since it's a fairly thin piece of meat, it will cook pretty quickly when seared in a hot pan, but especially so if it's from grass-fed cattle.

To recap some grass-fed facts from Episode 1 – Top Round "London Broil," grass-fed beef is much lower in fat, so it cooks faster, and can dry out faster if over-cooked. As you'll hear me say in the video recipe, I only cooked mine for a couple minutes per side to a fairly rare temperature. This ensured a juicy, tender, and flavorful steak.

Speaking of flavorful, I LOVE this warm caramelized mushroom salad as a topping for steaks, especially these steaks. The earthy mushrooms really amplify the beefy flavors of the steak -- and the sherry vinaigrette and fresh tarragon are perfect conduits. I hope you grab yourself some grass-fed beef and give this recipe a try. Enjoy!



Ingredients:
For the mushroom salad:
8 large mushrooms, sliced
1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp butter
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
salt to taste
1 whole garlic clove, peeled and bruised
1 tbsp fresh chopped tarragon

For the rest
1 tbsp olive oil
2 (8-oz) New York strip steaks
salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp butter to finish sauce

36 comments:

Ollie (England) said...

Hey Chef John,
Thank you for the reply regarding your Buttermilk chicken - came out really well :)

Again, if I were to ask my butcher (I'm lucky enough to have a proper market in my city) where would the New York Strip cut be?

Also I recently had a great creamy almond and pepper sauce with a skirt steak in a restaurant and I can't imagine where I'd start- that would be a definite foodwish if you have any spare time please :)

Chef John said...

It's from the sirloin, any butcher should know what a NY strip is. You can always Google a graphic of the cow cuts chart and bring it in!

blogagog said...

Are you sure? I was always told that the NY strip was the less tasty side of a T-bone or porterhouse steak. I'm pretty sure it's right, because if you ever buy a T-bone, you can tell by the shape.

Chef John said...

Am I sure about what? btw, the two cuts on a Tbone are the strip loin and the tenderloin... the NY strip loin section is far more tasty than tenderloin. the TL is more tender, but bland.

tut said...

Gacckks I watched your Mark Bittman video an todays is using grass fed beef with mushrooms :( an he said we only need to eat 1/2 pd a week of meats :( I still have half a rack of three beer ribs to finish today :( I was over the half pd limit for week yesterday when seasonings the ribs :( o gacckks o gacckks what to do ,I need those beefy mushrooms an um ribs to :) P.S. with ur fries

TeenChef said...

Hey Chef John, I was wondering if it is legal for kids to buy sherry wine for cooking?
And I am wondering if you could give me some tips on making cooking videos!
Thanks!

J said...

I'm not a fan of the beef steak, but you can bet I'll be trying the mushroom salad! Thanks for another way to cook that delicious fungus!

Chef John said...

kids can't buy any type of wine. my advice is to not start making food videos, there's no money in it. Now, go do your homework!

Anonymous said...

Yes, I know theres no money in it. But I have a scorching passion for cooking.

Chef John said...

i was kidding... then start filming and uploading to youtube, the more u do, the better you'll get. unfortunately i dont have time to give you a detailed how-to but there are many of those tutorials online. keep the recipes simple and have fun!

minhsa1337 said...

Thanks Chef John :) Your the best!

Anonymous said...

Yo... Chef John I noticed from the vast dishes you prepare that I've seen some Asian influences in your cooking......Granted I see the Itailian, French, Mediterranean...etc... but I was wondering have you ever tinkered with Cuisine Fusion?.... Maybe some recipes that you've thought up....?

But if I did have a Food Wish..... it would be something I thought up. And I would like to see you try your hand at it.... ahem..here goes..

Jamaican Jerk Ribs marinated in pineapple juice, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, peppercorns w/ salt and pepper.... Then Rubbed with Jerk Rub grilled over low heat until the collagen breaks down (mopped with pineapple juice and white wine vinegar blend)....Served over a Pineapple Chutney topped with fresh Cilantro. Top off with a dollup of creme fresh blended with fresh lime zest....With a baked Blue Potato seasoned with jerk seasoning and Honey Butter with another Dollup of the Creme Fresh Lime Zest Blend..... Garnish with Cilantro, Squeezed Limes... & the Squash Bird if need be.... :P

Phew... I think up of stuff like this but have never tried to cook them..... (laziness and money).... So I'm begging you to give it a shot in your spare time....

Thanks C.J.

-mb : P

kelly said...

Hey Chef...
put some more stuff on your Amazon Wish List! I refuse to give paypal my bank account number so no paypal for me, but I would buy you some 'stuff'.

Also, I'm doing a CSA share this year. I'm getting beautiful and tasty carrots with the beautiful greens. Any thoughts on what to do with the greens? Can I toss 'em in stock if nothing else?

Chef John said...

Thanks! What kind of greens?

kelly said...

Well lots of greens with the CSA (spinach, heratige lettuce, earlier pea shoots now fava beans etc,) but I should have been more specific.

Is there anything useful about carrot top greens? They're so pretty, but I don't think I've ever seen them used for anything.

Chef John said...

not sure if carrot tops are edible, but I have a nice fava demo if you type "fava" in the search box up top. Also a fava and bean salad.

kelly said...

Thanks, I can always count on your demo recipes to be worth doing. Spice rack on the way .... via super saver shipping so you should have a 'surprise' from the UPS guy next week.

Chef John said...

awesome! thanks!

kelly said...

You're welcome. I appreciate your demos.

Now, I'm off to find your fava recipe. So far I've used them by mashing them and combining with garlic mashed potatoes and bacon crumbles then filling some ravioli. But fava's are new to me, and I'm loving them so I need to find more uses.

Chef John said...

try them mashed half and half with white beans. Add garlic, lemon, olive oil and spread on crostini.
MMMMM

TruEngineer said...

Just made this today and it turned out great! I'm actually going to make a blog about it. Thanks for the recipe and keep them coming!

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John,

I made some caramelised mushroom to go with my beef steak for dinner tonight, followed your recipe exactly! And I must say the mushroom tasted heavenly! It's the best sauce I have ever made!:D Thanks so much for the wonderful recipe!

Chef John said...

thanks!

Hastings said...

Dear Chef John,

this must be recipe number 25 or something I have cooked from you, and I must say it was really nice!

I had no sherry vinegar at hand, so I used balsamic vinegar, but I think I should not have used so much of it. I think sherry vinegar might be a little less heavy. But nevermind, it just means I will have to try it again with sherry! :)

ty for your recipes!

Bardbarienne said...

Damnation this was good, despite substituting everything important to this recipe:

-using questionable supermarket stewing beef instead of steak
-using rice vinegar instead of sherry vinegar (the internet told me it would work)
-using 14-15 baby bellas instead of 8 large mushrooms
-using a mix of extra virgin olive oil and canola oil to try and dilute the EVOO flavor, due to a lack of normal olive oil

Because, silly me, I went grocery shopping before deciding which of your recipes I would try first, so I had to deal with whatever I had on hand (I guess that's the test of a good chef?). The vinegar got a little annoying toward the end, but if all the bits were sized properly on my end I'm sure this would be even better.

Your blog is amazing; I have never wanted to be a foodie so much. :D I'm about to try to make lava cake!

Anonymous said...

that is a freakishly small wooden spoon.

Dan and Hilary said...

HI Chef John, new reader, big fan of your stuff already. I do however have a mushroom dilemma, I just don't like the standard garden mushroom, or portobellos, but have had some in stir frys I have enjoyed.

Any mushrooms out there for those of us that sadly don't enjoy the taste of garden mushrooms?

My wife loves them, so I will try this anyway, but wanted to join in the fun.

Thanks for the terrific videos, keep up the great work!

Jesse from Detroit said...

Best steak I've ever made... and easily top five eaten. Thanks for this keeper!

Jesse from Detroit said...

I'm amping this recipe (along with the herbed potato wedges)up for a dozen of my closest friends tonight (bachelor party). Do you think I could store cooked steaks in the oven (where the potatos are cooking) until all the steaks are done?

Chef John said...

sorry, no way to tell, too many variables, size, thickness, temp, time, etc... I imagine they would over cook in an oven that hot. You can cook all the steaks MR and then reheat them all in the oven at the same time.

*SpArKy* said...

Made this lsat night.....FANTASTIC!

Anonymous said...

Made this last night, but replaced the terragon with slightly less than 1 tbsp of dried thyme and just a touch of clove. Very nice, indeed!

Anonymous said...

My husband likes well done steak much to my chagrin, but pan frying makes NY strip (his favoite steak) taste so good. Therefore, I have butterflied the strip to get it well done without drying it out. Just a tip I thought I'd share. I wish he would eat medium rare or rate, life would be easier.

Anonymous said...

"Significant shrinkage" ... don't worry; your intertextual allusion to "Seinfeld" was not lost on me.

AT said...

Just wanted you to know that ever since I made this 4 months ago, it's entered my weekly rotation. This steak recipe has changed my life due to its deliciousness.

Chang Kyoung Ha said...

Hi Johns.
First of I have to say your Rib eye recipe was amazing. My friends loved it.
Thank you.

I assume that the NY strip is equivalent to UK sirloin cut. Yes? (I am currently in UK).

As you know the UK sirloin comes with that strip of fat on top. When I cook my steak I use typical griddle pan with smoking hot temperature. Well it's on the hob that the actual gas flame...

If this is the case about how long do I need to cook that 8oz steak (around 230g) to get medium rare? Plus how long for that strip of the fat on top of the meat?