Friday, March 12, 2010

Man Fish Love

I'm a TED Head. I'm sure I'm not the first one to coin that phrase, but for me it's an accurate moniker. I could watch these lectures all day. This one features Chef Dan Barber in "How I fell in love with a fish," where he shares his discovery of an incredibly unique fish farm in Spain. I hope you find this as fascinating as I did. Enjoy!




Chef John Needs Your Vote!

Have you heard? Food Wishes has been nominated in the video category for the Saveur Magazine 1st Annual Best Food Blog Awards! Help us turn the honor of being nominated into the reality of a glorious win! Please follow this link to cast your vote now. Thanks!

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef,
Did you change the RSS output of foodwishes.com? In the past I can watch those videos directly in Google Reader, and now there is only several sentences, no pics no videos.

Chef John said...

yes. people were stealing and publishing the full feed, so now it's just a tease. You now need to make one extra click to get the goods.

Italy Lover said...

Thanks so much for posting this, Chef John.

It is wonderful and important.

ARTNAK said...

"How I fell in love with a fish,"

Thanks Chef John for posting This TED lecture .. it was fascinating and enlightening.

Jack Parker said...

I love food knowledge! I enjoy learning about nutrition, food cycles, etc., This really was fascinating. I'd never heard of TED before you posted the clip of Jamie Oliver. (Poor guy is having a time of it in West Virginia with those lunch ladies and radio DJ's!)

I look forward to checking out more TED videos. It's too bad the government and big business are in a conspiracy against healthy, natural food. Monsanto is pure evil and greed.

Twighlore said...

TED heads and foodies UNITE!

BillW, NH said...

I'm with Jack Parker.

For about a $5000 investment per family unit we could feed most of the hungry world through aquaponics but instead our tax dollars are going to the mega-farms, Monsanto, and the like yet people all over the world starve to death each and every day.

milkshake said...

I find this lecture quite annoying. Non-intensive farming: Sure if you let your pigs out to forage in a forest instead of raising them in crowded pens they will be healthier, happier, leaner, you will need to feed them less as they eat acorns and roots and other grub - and you will have less problem with stinky "sludge". I bet they taste better too. But you need to have that big unused acreage of forest nearby.

In this case they flooded a failed ranch back into marshland. It would not have worked if they did not have the channels in place from the previous owner and lots of inexpensive land - and perhaps also a government enviro grant supporting this march restoration. It is a great success but its not widely replicable.

Also, the food redistribution fallacy right at the beginning: people in the 3rd world are hungry and diseased not because of ineffective redistribution of food and medicines - its because of their crappy governments and wars and religious fanatics prevent them from getting any wealth into their system. Intensive farming and US farming subsidies are contributing to the problem as far as they make the food aid cheaper - these imported food surpluses when redistributed absolve the terrible regimes from responsibility for feeding their own people.

Courtney said...

john have you seen the one where the dorky chef goes on and on about his love affair with the farmer with the geese and the fois gras revolution? must see, i reccomend.

Robert Lewis said...

Thanks for this.