Monday, November 29, 2010

Prime Time for Revisiting Prime Rib of Beef

It's an iconic holiday table scene; you carving a juicy, perfectly pink prime rib while a roomful of friends and family watches, in awe of your awesomeness.

Unfortunately, despite our best efforts, it's sometimes more like you cutting through a dry, o
vercooked roast while they stare daggers at you.

You can almost hear them thinking, "Way to screw up $80 worth of beef, jerk. I hope there's lots of gravy."

Well, hopefully this proven mathematical method will increase your chances for success significantly. This is a new video revisiting the same method I featured in this Prime Rib post a few years ago, which only used photos. There are lots of great comments on the original post, and if you're skeptical, you should go check them out.

Here is the formula for what was called, "Method X." The rib is brought to room temperature. Overnight is good, but at least 6 hours (this is CRITICAL)! Season anyway you like. Then multiply the exact weight times 5 minutes. For me it was 5.35 x 5 = 26.75 minutes, which we round up to 27.

The rib is cooked at 500 degrees F for exactly that many minutes. Then the oven is turned off. You wait 2 hours without opening the door. You then remove the prime rib and slice into the most perfectly medium-rare meat you've ever seen. By the way, I will be posting a short how-to for a quick au jus soon. Enjoy!


Special Notes:

  • To use this method you must have a full-sized, modern oven. It must have a digital temperature setting that indicates when it is preheated. Older ovens with manual controls can vary greatly, and the doors may not have the proper insulation.
  • I've heard from lots of people that have used electric ovens and reported great results.
  • This is a specific formula for achieving a perfectly pink prime rib cooked somewhere a shade under medium rare. I have no info on altering it for other degrees of doneness.
IMPORTANT PRO TIP!!!: Prime rib is very expensive, so no matter what method you use (traditional or Method X), you should always have a probe-style thermometer inserted so that the internal temp can be monitored, to avoid any chance of over-cooking. Set the probe alarm (125 F. for medium-rare) just in case, and pull the roast from oven even if there's still time left on the timer. 





Ingredients:
4 to 8 pound Prime Rib of Beef, bone-in, fat cap removed (ask the butcher to explain)
kosher salt as needed
1/4 cup soft butter
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence (this is just a dried herb blend - you can use any thing you like, or just salt and pepper)

For more traditional methods of cooking Prime Rib of Beef, check out these other great recipes:
Simply Recipes' Prime Rib
Serious Eats' The Food Lab: How to Cook a Perfect Prime Rib
Mark Bittman's Prime Rib Roast for a Small Crowd

151 comments:

Rita said...

how about grilling the rib? will that work for this recipe? reason i'm asking is, we grill every new year's eve with out friends at their B&B - the only thing they have is a grill. i'm planning to do this for the celebration.

Chef John said...

no, i'm afraid it wouldn't translate to a grill. :-(

BIg Boys Oven said...

wow nice!

Asian Malaysian said...

omg, that is so awesome!

Guat said...

hey are you sick? no garlic on the seasoning ????

Arquitecto Jorge Zamudio said...

Hello there Chef! I've been following your videos for a while, and I really admire your dedication and how refreshing is to watch each of your videos and posts.
I was just wondering, in this recepie, what would be the ecuation to have this prime bif well done? Since we are not too much into medium rare meats.
Thanks and I will be commenting more often on your videos.
Gusto en saludarle! Desde Mexico con afecto!
Warmest regards.

Chef John said...

sorry, can't help you! You just have to use a traditional recipe, BUT this is a bad cut to cook well done. It's very dry and tough.

Anonymous said...

Awesome recipe. It has worked for me on several occasions. I actually found this blog by looking for a prime rib recipe a while back and found "method X" to be right on the money.

I really can't wait for the au jus recipe to follow this up.

To the person asking if you can do a prime rib on the grill. Absolutely, I've done quite a few but the problem is temp control. While I would normally argue that everything taste better on the grill, this is one piece of meat I prefer in the oven.

Rock on Chef John.

Maui said...

chef john, i have a VERY important question. i haven't made steak my whole 21 yrs of living and the problem is i don't have an oven, only a broiler. can i cook steak on a broiler?
p.s.
-i take your word over my eyes every single time ;)

Chef John said...

Sure, you can do a London Broil http://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2009/06/cooking-grass-fed-beef-episode-1-top.html

Clara said...

Chef John, this looks delightful. We're going to make this for the Xmas dinner party.

And to answer the question you posted on YouTube, Yes, I would pay $5 plus shipping for a freakishly tiny wooden spoon. BUT only if you sign them. :D

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John,
This beef looks amazing! I've always used the low heat 250 deg method from "the best recipe" cookbook & setting my oven probe for 135deg for medium rare with great results. But this is intriguing & I have to try it!

My question is this, do we always have to leave it in the oven for 2 hours even if roasting just one bone? And what about a bigger joint say 4 bones? Thanks and your videos are phenomenal!

cheers, C

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John,
This is C again. Ignore my questions abt the 2 hr wait for 1 or more ribs, obviously it gets taken care of by the math formula...don't u just hate it when the lightbulb goes on in your head only after u hit the send button?

Anyway thanks & cant wait for your au jus video!!

C

Fernando said...

Chef John,

Why not cook the prime rib (or standing rib roast) sous vide and then finish it in a 500-degree oven for 25 minutes? That's my plan for Christmas dinner.

I have a medium-sized beer cooler that I use as my sous vide station. I heat the water to a boil then add enough room-temp water to get it to within 2 degrees of my desired temperature then monitor it every 30-45 minutes and add enough boiling water to keep it at the temperature I'm looking for (normally 135) and let it sit in the sous vide for four hours (then crust it in a pre-heated 500 degree oven). Perfect every time!

KrisD said...

This is my favorite thing on earth--and it's tonight's dinner (happy birthday to ME!!)

I love this method CJ, thanks for bringing it to us!

Scott R from San Francisco said...

Chef John. The issue I have had with this recipe is that after the 2 hours the meat is luke warm at best. My guests want a nice hot piece of meat. Not luke warm/cold.

Any advice here? I cooked a 9 pounder last night actually and used the 20 minutes at 500 degrees and then 15 minutes per pound at 350 degrees. Turned out perfect and hot.

What are your thoughts on these two methods?

Chef John said...

Both work great if done properly! Yes, traditional is warmer, but much less gently cooked, which can effect the texture. This internal temp of 125 is only going to be so warm anyway. I've never really seen true "hot" rare prime rib.

jccraia said...

Looking forward to the Au Jus Chef!
Have done the Prime Rib a couple of times over the year. Came close to blowing it this Thanksgiving...room temperature was 77 degrees and I left it in 15 mins extra...beef came out 139 degrees...Ouch! It was a 6.55 pound bone-in roast.

verosgalematverden said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Steve said...

Chef:

Given the vagaries of ovens, wouldn't it make more sense to cook by temperature using a probe thermometer rather than time?

Alton Brown says "never trust an oven" and I tend to agree.

By the way, have you seen the Good Eats terra cotta pot method?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/dry-aged-standing-rib-roast-with-sage-jus-recipe/index.html

http://goodeatsfanpage.com/Season5/EA1E02.htm

Comments?

kfinnn said...

I made this for the first time last year for Christmas. I hope Trader Joes brings back their prime ribs - perfect size for a small group. Method X is truly the secret weapon you must have to achieve the ultimate in prime rib perfection. Used it 2 or 3 times now - perfect - always perfect! Thanks Chef John! Really looking forward to receiving Michele's BBQ sauce too.

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John,

You are one of my Fav.
How would this be done in an electric convection oven, or should I just use roast setting without convection.

David

Chef John said...

Sorry, never tested in convection oven!

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John,

Will this method also work on larger sized standing rib roasts as well? Example maybe 15 to 20 pounds?

Jason

jchu1025 said...

will this technique work on a 20 pound roast as well?

Chef John said...

Theoretically, but for one that big, I would just just a traditional method.

Anonymous said...

Chef John. I have just discovered your site and must say am looking forward to trying out some of these recipes. I noticed however, that you list the ingredients and not the actual instructions. Therefore, while I watch the video, I usually take notes. This is fine by me, but I am just curious if you will start putting instructions down for your recipes?

Chef John said...

I hate to type, so I just do the video and ing. and you guys are in charge of the rest. :-)

riley723 said...

Looks delicious Chef! What if I'm using a convection oven, do I need to decrease the heat to make up for the convection? Or should I use the regular baking mode? There's also a convection roast setting, as well as a regular roast setting, would it be better to use one of those?

Chef John said...

Sorry, no idea! Only used conventional oven.

Craig said...

Hi Chef John,

Would this method work with a 12 pounder? Cooking one up for a Christmas party tomorrow and wondering since the recipe calls for a 4 to 8 pound roast.

Thanks!

Chef John said...

i've heard it does, but never tested myself! sorry!

William said...

Man, I was hoping to try out this recipe for Christmas but my parents come home with a rib eye roast. Any idea how long it should be cooked per pound? My dad wants to cut the thing in half so we can serve different wellness's but won't that affect the juiciness?

Chef John said...

sorry, don't understand, this recipe is for rib eye. just use the formula given.

Anonymous said...

I was wondering if this would work for a boneless prime rib?

Thanks! I really enjoy your videos.

Chef John said...

don't believe so, but never tried

David said...

Whoa whoa whoa, Chef John!!! An iPhone 3g(s)!? What happened to your Sexy Nexus!!! The Nexus S was just released :) Great looking piece of meat, by the way :)

Jeremy said...

I want to make this tomorrow morning for a work lunch, I have a 7.85 lb rib roast, so that's like 39 minutes. I'm worried that after it's done and I'm ready to transport it like 15 minutes away that the roast will go past the medium to medium rare mark and be over done. Chef John, would you recommend slicing it at home or keeping the roast intact (without rib bones of course) and slicing at work? Hopefully someone can give me some good advice!

Chef John said...

It wont be over done, it will be too cold. Prime rib is not really something you can cook and take to someones home. After the 2 hours in the oven it is just warm. If you used a traditional method, and drove it over during the 20 minute resting time, you would be ok, but I wouldn't use this method.

Jeremy said...

CJ, thanks! That helps a lot. So I would then cook this beast to medium rare (or even rare)using the traditional method, then the 20 minutes resting on my drive to work will get it to the sweet spot. It stinks because I really wanted to use this method!

Chef John said...

no need to under cook it, it has to rest anyway.

Jeremy said...

Thanks for the help, I have hence moved the operation to a co-workers house which is literally 2 minutes away! The hot au jus will compensate!

terri said...

I have a 20lb prime rib bone in. You suggested cooking it the traditional method. Should I cut it in half. I am concerned I will have to cook the ends well done in order to get the center rare. What are your thoughts and what is a good traditional method? Silly me, first time cooking a prime rib and I buy a 20lb, prime grade no less. I must be nuts.

Chef John said...

don't cut it! :-) try this http://americanfood.about.com/od/meatsandpoultry/r/primerib.htm enjoy!

Jeremy said...

Well I hope this works, I am 1:38 away from the finished product! My friend was kind enough to open her kitchen like 2 minutes away from work so I'll be able to bring in nice warm beef! Cross your fingers everyone!!

Thanks again CJ

Anonymous said...

around here they include the bone but is already cut off and tied. Guess this wont work or will it ? thank you

Jeremy said...

WOW everything came out great, beautiful pink from end to end! Thanks for the awesome recipe.

Anonymous said...

Is 11 lbs. too big? It would be 500 degrees for 55 minutes and then turn the oven off for 2 hours, right?

thanks!!!

Chef John said...

It should work, but I've never done one that big! So I can't gaurantee.

Michael said...

I got a 6.6 pound lovely piece of meat. I let it sit out for about 2 1/2 hours. It was room temp. The butter mixture I changed it a bit added 1/4 butter, 12 finely chopped garlic cloves, dried thyme, salt, lawrys seasoning (Chicago thing), salt and pepper to the butter. Cooked at 500 for 36 minutes. Now to play the waiting game. Unfortunately I have to transport it. An hour out. A preheated oven at 250 will be waiting for me upon arrival. I will attempt to warm it up for 20 min. I will reply with the outcome of the results in case any of you are interested. Merry Christmas!

Michael said...

Follow up to my earlier post. No need for warming it back up. It still was piping hot after transport. Wrapped up in foil and then a towel to retain the heat worked well. However last 10 min I turned on heat to 250. When I got to the friends house and we cut into it it was a beautifully cooked medium rare. Maybe just a tad under. Picture perfect just like the video. I took temp when pulled out of oven it was 125 a tad over maybe. After much work and I think my new stove helped out alot. I've made alot of prime ribs in different ways this has been the best yet. Done the same idea however at a lower temp and a lot shorter high temp time. Thats the key here folks that high temp and the room temp. Thanks my friend for helping me out on getting it just right.

Andy said...

Chef.....Wow!

We just finished eating some amazing prime rib, by following this recipe exactly! 8.69 lbs of beef, 45 minutes at 500 with a roaring sizzle from the oven that honestly had me pacing in the kitchen wondering what I'm going to do with the chared beef I was sure would emerge. But no, after the 2 hour resting period out came the most incredible, most delicious prime rib I have ever tasted!! I kept repeating to my wife my disbelief that anything this good could come from our kitchen. Amazing! Thank you so much! The Au Jus also turned out great as did the Horseraddish sauce! I will never demonstrate such a lack of faith for one of your recipes again! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Chef John said...

So great to read all these success stories! Thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

i would like to test the recipe but i only have a roast beef without bone. is this possible? Or do i have to choose another recipe?

Thanks for your comments.

Greetings from Germany,
Jan

Chef John said...

Sorry, can't tell you, never tried, and don't know that effects it.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I have tried it (roast beef without bones) i just ad 0,5 lbs per mising bone on the weight of the beef and followed the recipe.
It was delicious!!

Thanks for the recipe from Germany!

Jan

RPM said...

Chef, I tried your method on Christmas.

7.15lb 3-rib roast,
In the oven at 54,
66F after the 36-minute 500F blast,
120 after 60 minutes,
142 after 2 hours.

So it came out a little over-done for my tastes. It was good though.

I'm not sure how accurate my oven is, but I was also wondering if the cut (loin-end, chuck-end) would make a difference. I was using a loin-end.

The guaranteed time from start to finish is invaluable when cooking other items, though.

Thanks for the recipe

Chef John said...

RPM, yes, that sounds like your oven may be a bit off, but the better question is, if you had a temperature probe in the meat the whole time, and could see the temperatures, why didn't you pull the meat out before it got to 142?

RPM said...

@ Chef John: My instincts were telling me to take it out, but I stuck to the battle plan. Next time I'll pull it, though.

Now I just need a second oven to have ready to go when I pull the roast to make the Yorkshire pudding.

Thanks again.

KenFitz said...

Chef John you are the best. Been coming to this site for some time now and enjoyed many of your recipe's. My daughter called to ask if I knew how to cook prime rib and I had just seen this post and wanted to try it myself, so I steered her in this direction, we talked it through and at 7 this evening enjoyed the best prime rib I have ever eaten. It came out just as you described. It was done exactly right. The only thing I regret was having to leave the bones with them for a much anticipated midnight snack. We have already scheduled re-do this Sunday at 3:00.
This is a must try recipe! Thanks for your efforts. KenFitz

KenFitz said...

Chef John you are the best. Been coming to this site for some time now and enjoyed many of your recipe's. My daughter called to ask if I knew how to cook prime rib and I had just seen this post and wanted to try it myself, so I steered her in this direction, we talked it through and at 7 this evening enjoyed the best prime rib I have ever eaten. It came out just as you described. It was done exactly right. The only thing I regret was having to leave the bones with them for a much anticipated midnight snack. We have already scheduled re-do this Sunday at 3:00.
This is a must try recipe! Thanks for your efforts. KenFitz

Chef John said...

Thanks!! And thanks for the donation!!

Doug said...

Hi, Chef,

Thank you for the recipe, it worked great for our Christmas dinner. Now we have this lovely bit of leftover beef. Can you suggest a way to re-heat it without cooking it?

Doug

Chef John said...

I like to slice into steaks and sear until warmed through. thanks!

jccraia said...

My favorite thing to do with the leftovers is to make a prime rib soup. Here is a link to a great recipe:
http://mystolenrecipes.blogspot.com/2010/12/prime-rib-soup.html

Doug said...

And it's great sliced thin for a sandwich.

rivergal47 said...

Absolutely delicious! Followed your directions, including the Herb de Provence butter/salt coating. Was my birthday prime rib and memorable. The au jus was wonderful. Thanks Chef!

Leilani said...

Does this method work the same for grass-fed beef?

Dave said...

John - I tried this and it worked out fantastic! Best I have ever had.

My au jus was not very good though. I followed your recipe exactly but it was too oily.

thanks!

philogaia said...

I have a lovely grass fed dry aged piece of prime rib thawing in the fridge right now (no, I'm not rich, just fortunate to visit a small town farmer's market at the right time.) I've studied the fine print carefully on this method and determined my oven is not a candidate. It is a small oven installed in 1972 and probably not big enough or insulated enough for this method. It makes great jerky, though, since I can hold the temp at 130 degrees effortlessly, a feat not possible with modern ovens. I'm going to play it safe and go with a traditional method.

Anonymous said...

You should've seen the look on my boyfriend's 90 year old grandma's face when she saw the perfect medium rare prime rib being sliced into. No more doubters for this foolproof method! Thanks for the recipe Chef John!

Mary said...

WOW! I just found this website about 3 weeks ago and I am lovin it!!!! Today, Easter Sunday, we had this prime rib. Must admit I was skeptical, but didn't need to be, came out PERFECT!!! Amazing, can't wait to keep trying your recipes. I LOVE your videos, makes it so easy to follow. Thanks for putting together such a wonderful site.

max_clif said...

I have one of those rositerie ovens. Those things that turn around and around with a heating element at the back.

I was wondering how to modify this recipe to accomodate my rositerie oven?

While I do have a regular oven, the rositerie would make the meat cook more evenly, which is why Im asking :D

Chef John said...

Sorry, no idea! Never used one.

Anonymous said...

I tried it and got mixed results. Now the digital probe said 140F at which point i removed it from the oven.

I cut into the meat only to find it very bloody.

Is 135F medium rare, because according to the instructions of the probe 135F is actually rare. But everyone seems to be saying prime rib is 135F for medium rare.

lookrichbitch said...

Hi Chef John,

Do you know if I would need to add any additional time if my roast is bigger, say for 10 people? I love it medium rare! Thanks!

Chef John said...

I've never done a big one, but I've heard it works. Personally, for a larger party, I may go with the traditional method to be safe.

Anonymous said...

Hey your recipe worked very well - thanks!

Question - is it possible to replace the butter with Olive Oil (will it burn?) or perhaps Canola oil?

While it tasted great, the amount of butter made it impossible to eat more than maybe 1/3 of what I can normally eat. Now I know why at some buffets I feel very full eating Prime Rib

Dan said...

I tried this recipe tonight for supper. It was amazing and came out just as your video showed.

Can I use this for other lessor value cuts of beef with the same results?

Chef John said...

not sure, never tried!

leah o said...

I'm trying this tonight with a tiny (just over two pound) roast for me and my hubby. Should I adjust at all? I'm so impressed to see all of your prompt replies on here! Thanks!

Cindy H. said...

Hi Chef John,

I've tried this recipe a few times and it always turns out delicious. My question to you is, why is the dripping always tried out/burnt? I am never able to make au jus out of the dripping. Please help. I plan on cooking prime rib again tomorrow for Thanksgiving dinner.

Chef John said...

Those drippings might look too dark, but that's what they look like. Deglaze with beef broth and it should be fine!

Anonymous said...

Chef John,
I was wondering if this method would work with dry aged prime rib and/or using a salted crust. BTW, thanks for all your work. Great site.

Chef John said...

The dry aged wouldn't matter, but not sure about salt crust. I don't see why not.

Chuck (the 1st time prime rib cooker) said...

I have a 16.5 lb Prime Rib that I will be trying this method on this Sunday. The math comes out to 83 min at 500 degrees. Then 2 hours with the door shut... 83 min is a really long time for 500 degrees.. Can you see any problems with using method X on 16.5 lbs? I am feeding 18 people and I don't want to ruin it.

Chuck (the 1st time prime rib cooker) said...

I really want to use your method X however i have a 16.5lb prime rim with bones.. I was wondering if I should cut it in half so that I would have two 8.25lb prime ribs and cooking in the same oven and in the same large pan. Would that allow me to achieve the medium-rare with the method X. I have never done a prime rib before and I have 18 people coming over this Sunday. What are your thoughts on cutting it in half?

Chef John said...

I've never tried with any that big. Or cutting in half. I'd prob use a traditional method with thermometer. Good luck!

Anonymous said...

I will have a 10lb rib roast but your recipe calls for a 4-8 lb roast. Have you yried a 10 lb roast and do I need to adjust the cooking time or just follow the recipe?

Chef John said...

I haven't! I've heard you can, but I've not confirmed.

KPeff said...

I've got an 8-pounder in my fridge doing some dry-aging right now. I'm so excited. This will be the first year that I cook the main course at Christmas. My mother and I have the meal all planned out so everything will be ready to go around 5pm Christmas Eve. I even know who I'm going to torture with pics of prime rib food porn. Oh, and I'm making your shrimp cocktail because for some reason my family's holiday dinners always have shellfish or bivalves.

I was also thinking now is a great time for you to put up a beef cheeks recipe. Houston is only going to be cold for so long, so I need to take advantage of braising season. I also need some instruction on butchering the things. Mine come untrimmed.

Lastly, I noticed you've done a lot of faux-smoking of meats. My siblings and I bought my father an electric smoker this Xmas, which should be much more conducive to frequent, experimental, or otherwise small-batch smoking than a big cabinet smoker or something similar. I'll email you if the results turn out well. I have high hopes for this thing.

Barbie said...

Hi Chef John....I just bought a 15lb standing prime rib roast with this method in mind and I cant wait to try it out but after rereading your original directions asking that we use a 4 to 8 lb prime rib I'm wondering if mine is too big for this method to work? I hope that you get this message soon since we are having it for Christmas dinner in 2 days.:) Also, my mom has one of those ovens with optional cooking methods such as convectional bake, convectional roast or just plain baking. Would the convectional method throw this recipe off or should I stick with the okain baking method? Thanks again for your help...I love reading your blogs, you are awesome!
Sincerely,
Barbie

Chef John said...

For ones that big I recommend doing a traditional method. Roast at 500 for 15 minutes to sear, then slow roast at 300-325 until you get your desired internal temp (125 is how I like mine). Also, just use the regular oven settings.

Anonymous said...

Chef John, I have just found your site after following a video you did on another food site and was curious about specific quantities for ingredients. My comment is that I first heard of this meathod about 5 years ago for cooking an eye of round, use 7 minutes per pound, and leave it in the oven for 2 - 2.5 hours. Melts in your mouth and so much flavour. The only roast of meat my teenagers cheer for when they hear it's supper and fight over for next days leftovers for lunch. Thanks for this one amd looking forward to trying this.

Anonymous said...

I have been reading today on this recipe. I just bought a 3lb roast. I've never done prime rib before. My husband is very skeptical that the roast will be juicy and not leather after being in the oven that long with the 500 start. I'm gonna try it and I hope I can prove him wrong!!! I'll repost when it comes out awesome!!!

Anonymous said...

Will this method work for a 2.5 lb roast?

I am planning on making this for me and my husband on christmas day

Chef John said...

It should!

Anonymous said...

We are slow cooking a 10lb rib roast with no bone using your recipe for 5min. a lb.plus 2 hrs left in oven. Is their a time difference for boneless?

Chef John said...

Sorry, never done with boneless before. Not sure of time dif.

Anonymous said...

Well Well Well...my husband ate his words, a little crow, and THIS AWESOME PRIME RIB!!!! I'm the one with the skeptical husband from yesterday...he had me so worried but ALAS A GREAT PRIME RIB!! He said it ranks up there with one of the best he's ever had!!! Thank you so very much!!! I just want to say that the roast was only 2.59 lbs..and it worked out great so you can go less than the 4 lb and it will turn out. I will no longer be afraid to try a Prime Rib at home. Why pay all the money at a restaurant when you can have quality at home!!!! You're the best!!!

Anonymous said...

Hi Chef John,
tried this last year with 5 pound, incredible. Thank you

QUESTION: after purchasing 5 pounder, guest count doubled.
Can I do this with (2) 5 pound roasts?

Thanks

Chef John said...

Sorry, I've never done 2 at once, so not sure of the calculations.

Anonymous said...

I have a 3 lb and 5 lb roast. Should I combine the weight and run the math (40 min. cook time) or calculate using the 5 lb. (27 min cook time)? We want the 3 lb. more done.

Chef John said...

Sorry, never tried 2. Use traditional method!

TWO bit Raw FOODIE said...

CHEF JOHN,
Thank you thank you thank you. I am so happy I followed this recipe this year. My 10 lbs prime rib turned out beautiful and amazing thanks to you. Last year i made prime rib for the first time and it was a disaster. So I was determined to not waste an expensive piece of meat again. Yours was the first recipe to pop up and the most informed. Everyone praised the beef for tasting so great.

I was very scared leaving it out for so long at room temp and the 500 oven for 50 mins but man o man... great stuff... every single bite! you ROCK! My husband and family all thank you!

MelissaC said...

Chef John you didn't disappoint yet again. first Aunt Angela's cabbage rolls, now your Method X of Prime Rib perfection! I cooked an almost 11lb beast yeasterday to perfection. I did add water to the roasting pan and all that happened was less smoke in the room and the most amazing base for my au jus. I used butter, seasoned salt, some fresh garlic and fresh parsley on my rub and it was fantastic!! Thank you again Chef John and I look foreward to more of your amazing recipes!

Fire Marshal Bob said...

Chef John-
I made a 5 rib 12.15 lb Prime Rib, and the method worked perfectly! I left it out of the refrigerator for about 14 hours to get a true room temperature because it was such a large Rib. It was delicious!
Next time I'm thinking about reducing the initial cooking time to 4.75 min/lb to get a rare Prime Rib.
Any thoughts?
Thanks!

kinectick said...

Made this for my Christmas dinner using a 13 lbs prime rib roast and all I can say is, "Pure Perfection".

Thanks Chef!
Happy New Year to you and yours!!!!

Don said...

Chef John: Thank you for the Prime Rib recipe -- Method X works every time! A quick question: can you use Method X for a less expensive cut of beef? I specifically have in mind "Top Sirloin Roast" (also known by these names: Top Butt or Center-Cut Roast)??
Thank you,
Don

Chef John said...

Sorry, never tested.

Unknown said...

Last night I tested Method X using a 5 lb "Top Sirloin Roast" and it worked like a charm!

steakman said...

Quick question... what's "Room Temperature"?

I'm in Australia and room temperature here could be often be 86f++ :)

Many thanks - I'm hoping to give this one a go this weekend! :)

Anonymous said...

what do you mean by modern oven? does the oven have to be insulated with no gaps for cooling? how about a convection oven?

thanks

Chef John said...

yes, well insulated and digital temp display, etc. Never tried w/ convection.

The Dugan said...

Question-

Is it ok to leave it more than 2 hours? Say I was going out for about 4 hours, after I turn the oven off. Will it be ok when i get back?

The Dugan said...

AFter the oven shuts off - where we are leaving the roast in there for 2 hours - Is it possible to leave it in there for 4 hours without messing it up? just wondering i may need to step out for a bit - ?

Chef John said...

yes, but it will no longer be warm.

UAL_FlyGal said...

Hi Chef John!

Can this method be used w/ a bone-in leg of lamb?
BTW, I LUV your videos. :)

Servant of God said...

Here's hoping you'd answer look at this 2-year-old post and answer my question.

I notice that my oven has a "Cook and Hold" button on the front, with a separate timer. I've never used it before.

Would this feature be useful in this recipe?

Your food all look good, btw. Good job!

Ziffo said...

So I made this with my current stupid oven.

First the oven could not reach the 500F it reached pretty much 230 (with the "fan" mode? can't remember in english how it is told)

I kept it around 2-3 minutes longer and around 10 minute longer with the oven turned off.

What to say. I do not know how the one made by our chef was, mine was still super delicious, extremely tender and juicy.

I was actually surprised when I was going to remove the bones, I think I could have done it with my hands without the knife.

Ziffo said...

oh need to point out that my oven do not reach the 500 F that is around 260-270 C but it reach 230 C :p just to make my previous comment clearer.

I had to buy a oven termometer to get the temperatures right with your indications, chef!

Justin Tsan said...

Hey Chef John, I tried this method for a 14 pound boneless rib roast. It turned out perfect! So to all the readers and viewers asking about boneless and larger roast sizes, yes this method works.

Side note: The rib roast that we ordered was untrimmed, so it had a large section of fat attached to the side of the roast. It added at least a 1-2 pounds in weight to the roast, and accounted for the roast coming out closer to medium than medium-rare. If you were to divide the rib roast into three sections, only the section in the middle would be considered close to medium rare, so remember to account for untrimmed fat in the roast when calculating!

Clinton House said...

i have only left the rib out for 2 hours. is there any way i can still use this method

Yul said...

I made it last night for our Christmas Eve dinner. It was the best Christmas Eve dinner ever!!!! Thank you!

KS_LovesToCook said...

I made a 2 rib, 5.25 pound roast for Christmas this year. I only left the roast out at room temp for 2 hours, as I was concerned about food safety. I also used my digital probe so I could monitor the temp. After 2 hours standing in the oven the temp was only 95, so I turned the oven back on to 325 for awhile and since it was not really rising in temp I then increased to 400 for about 15 minutes until the temp was 120. Took it out and let it rest about 15 minutes, temp rose to 127. Turned out perfect (rare/med-rare in center, medium rare the rest).

Unknown said...

We made this for the first time as the main course for Christmas dinner this year. It came out absolutely perfectly!! To say it was the best Prime Rib ever is a complete understatement. No one knew what we were serving for dinner, but as soon as we cut into it, the entire table was in awe...thanks Chef John!!!

Douglas Miles said...

I have a VERY accurate and new oven and used multiple probes following results

Roast out for 9 hours and temp at 55 degrees at start weighed 7.85 lbs 500 degrees for 40 minutes.
End of 40 minutes up to 74 degrees and oven off. At end of 1 hour and 20 minutes had reached 125 and oven was drifted down to 195 degrees so took out. Was great but this one time only makes me wonder about math in a new and tight oven that is electric???

ShaneandShelly Cole said...

Hello, My Husband and I did the Method X with Our Prime Rib Roast about a year and a half ago. I think it was done For a Feb. 14th Celebration, Valentines Day, 2010. Anyway, we took pictures of our process, and would love to post them. We just dont see how to do that. Here, we can leave a comment, but it doesnt give anyplace that we can see to post our pictures. We loved how the Roast turned out. Shane And Shelly

ShaneandShelly Cole said...

Hello, My Husband and I did the Method X with Our Prime Rib Roast about a year and a half ago. I think it was done For a Feb. 14th Celebration, Valentines Day, 2010. Anyway, we took pictures of our process, and would love to post them. We just dont see how to do that. Here, we can leave a comment, but it doesnt give anyplace that we can see to post our pictures. We loved how the Roast turned out. Shane And Shelly

Chef John said...

Sorry, but this basic blogger software doesn't allow that! If you email to me, I'd love to see! foodwishes@yahoo.com thanks!

The Lady Wind said...

Hello Chef John! I am a big fan! I have used the Method X for making prime rib and it came out wonderfully. Great video instructions. I have a question regarding timing for sides. I notice you have a beautiful baked potato served with your prime rib. With the oven taken up with the prime rib, when do you have time to bake potatoes along with it? Do you have two ovens, throw the potatoes in during the sear time and leave them in the oven for the 2 hour wait? Would love some advice!

Chef John said...

No, I wouldn't add anything else to the oven. You need to do sides that can be cooked on the stovetop, or toasted oven, or microwave, etc. Don't remember how I did the potato, but maybe was just a prop!

nircMD said...

hi chef,

love ur videos, and have 2 questions:

any ideas on what to substitute for Herbes de Provence, other then just plain salt & pepper in this recipe?

if i were to use salt & pepper, how much of each should i use?

thanks

Chef John said...

Its just a dried herb mix. You can use whatever you like. Rosemary and thyme are great too.

Diane Burton said...

Wow! I have never before made a Prime Rib in my life, but took your advice Chef John, and followed your directions to the letter! The result? The most amazing Prime Rib any of us have ever eaten! PERFECTION!!! Oh, and I also watched your instructional video on flipping stuff in a pan, and wow'd my little girl while I flipped portabello mushrooms I was cooking. Thank you so much for your awesome recipes, videos and sense of humor! :)

lurker said...

Chef john it would be helpful if you told users that it is 5mins x xx POUNDS of meat.

In some countries it is customary to buy meat in kgs. And it isnt very clear whether the formula is for lbs or kgs. I know it is for lbs but for clarity it should be stated a bit more clearly :)

Christina Hartnett said...

Hey Chef John...I don't have the kind of pan you used for this...but I do have a dutch oven that is oven and flame safe.

I feel like this is such an ardtard question...but is that kind of thing OK to cook the prime rib in?

I'm excited, I'm making this for my husband THIS Thanksgiving!

Chef John said...

It should work, but I've never tried that. The only thing that could effect things, would be how the D.O. absorbs and transfers the heat, so I can't say 100% it would work exactly the same.

Chef John said...

It should work, but I've never tried that. The only thing that could effect things, would be how the D.O. absorbs and transfers the heat, so I can't say 100% it would work exactly the same.

Christina Hartnett said...

Thanks! I ended up using a different sort of pan which worked well.

I'm happy I bought an oven safe, leave in, meat thermometer per your suggestion.

My roast was 4.85 lbs which meant I had it in the oven for approx 25 minutes at 500 degrees. I switched off the oven and walked away. I left the oven light on so I was able to see the thermometer.

I peeked at it 40 minutes later and the thermometer was already at 130 degrees, so I yanked it from the oven right away.

I may not have had my thermometer in the thickest part of the meat, because I used it in another area and it read only 121 degrees. Either way, I figured with the carry over cooking, it would still reach 125 (which it did).

I wanted to have my side dishes done at the same time as the roast...and sadly that didn't happen since the roast was done 1 hour and 20 minutes early....but the meat rested on the counter while I finished everything else up. When I cut into the meat my husband about had a heart attack of pure joy (not a bad way to go I'm told), it was medium rare and super moist. The boiling hot Beef Au Jus really emphasized how delicious it turned out.

We ate kinda early so we had the munchies later. We TOTALLY threw the bones back in the oven with BBQ sauce for a snack.

This recipe is SO amazing!

Greg Moshier said...

Good Morning Chef-

I am very excited to try this method for our Christmas dinner this year.. However, I have a math question.. I have had to purchse two bone in large end cut roast to accomidate everybody this year.. One roast is 7.30 lbs and the other is 6.77 for a total weight of 14.07 lbs.. Do I take the "Total" weight of the two roast and 14.07 x 5 for a 1 hour and 11 minute cook time @ 500 degrees.. or do I use the weight of the larger roast 7.30 x 5 for a 37 minuted cook time @ 500.. I do not want to kill Christmas dinner this year.. Thank you

Chef John said...

Sorry, not sure! Never tested more than one. Not sure it will work the same.

Carrie Burton said...

This is my fourth time making a prime rib using your method and it has been a huge success every time! I have always used large cuts....8 bones, about 14-15 pounders! I use the directions EXACTLY and it turns out PERFECT! Thank you so much for sharing!!!

Andy Casper said...

HERE WE GO!!

I just put in a 15.88 lb, 6 bone, monster prime rib. It'll sear at 500ยบ for 80 minutes before we let it begin the resting process. This is almost twice as bit as the last one we did. I'll report back with the results.

Andy Casper said...

15.88 lb Follow-up.

The process still worked very well, but it seems like the math breaks down a little at some point. Instead of getting consistent medium-rare end-to-end like we do with the 8-9 lb roasts we got several well-done full slices at the edges and a thicker about 1.5" crust throughout. It was still very good, but if we do one this large again, we'll probably turn off the oven at 1 hour, maybe 70 minutes.

Hope this helps anyone doing larger roasts in the years to come. This is still the best prime rib recipe I've ever tasted.

Hilary said...

made this exactly as stated yesterday, it was PERFECT! 8 lb rib roast. DELICIOUS! I've tried several ways to make this and we always end up waiting for it to be done b/c it's still raw in the middle. Not this year! thanks!

Unknown said...

Will refridgerating "open air" 24 hours prior to bringing to room temp have any effect? - Jason

geologix said...

WOW!! I just followed your recipe for this Prime Rib Roast and it DELICIOUS! and thats an understatement... I will forever cook all my rib roasts like this thank you very much! Happy New Year Chef!

Jim Rice said...

Can I use an all-clad lasagne pan? Also, do you just leave the meat out uncovered for 6 hours?

Chef John said...

Any pan should work! You can cover with plastic if you want. Doesn't matter.

Brandon said...

Would the math be the same if I put in two roasts at a time? Feeding 6 adults + 3 children, so I was going to get two smaller roasts instead of one big one. I have two ovens, but was going to use the lower oven to make roasted potatoes. Thanks!