Friday, March 25, 2011

Homemade Crème Fraiche – Nobody's Ever Made it Just Once

Crème fraiche is French for "fresh cream," which makes it one of the most ironically named foods ever, since it's made by leaving cream out in a warm spot until it’s soured and thickened by a growing colony of bacteria. Yeah, fresh.

Regardless, making crème fraiche is very easy and as the title implies, once you taste the magic of homemade sour cream, you'll have a hard time not repeating this somewhat esoteric exercise. Sure it takes a couple days, but the effort is minimal for such a marvelous payoff.

As I mention in the video, besides the amazing taste and luxurious texture, maybe the best thing about crème fraiche is its ability to be cooked. Because of it's composition and fat content, it doesn’t curdle and separate when you heat it like sour cream.

This makes it an incredibly versatile addition to countless recipes. I can't think of many pan sauces that don’t benefit from a spoon or two. Yesterday on this blog, you saw it stirred into fried rice. Next week, you'll see it turn an ordinary pan of braised beef into a world-class Stroganoff. I could go on and on, and for SEO purposes I probably should, but you get the idea.

As long as your jars and utensils are very clean, preferably sterilized, there isn’t a lot that can go wrong. Be sure to get your hands on the best, freshest cream you can find. In the supermarket you'll want to look for "pasteurized," not "ultra-pasteurized" heavy whipping cream. Also, be sure to use cultured buttermilk otherwise you’re going to be waiting a full day to see nothing happen.

By the way, I'm extremely proud of this video recipe and blog post, but not for the usual reasons. It's because I didn’t make one single Randy Marsh joke! You South Park fans know what I'm talking about, and those of you that don’t should really check out this crème fraiche-themed episode. Enjoy!


Ingredients:
2 cups heavy cream
3 tablespoons cultured buttermilk

Mix together and leave in a warm spot (about 70-75 degrees F.) for 24 hours, or until thick. Refrigerate for 24 hours before using. Should last a week or two. 

132 comments:

Steve said...

CREME FRAICHE! Did you mix that with a shake weight?

Samsquanch said...

So...what I learned is to get my wife a shake weight :-)

Jennie said...

This proves yet again why I love what you do! I've made creme fraiche before but heated it, and very happy to know I can skip that step since it's one less pot to wash. Using the coffee filter was pretty damn brilliant too.

Chef Danielle @ Cooking Clarified said...

Well, that couldn't be simpler!! I had no idea it was that easy. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

How long will this keep (refrigerated) after its prepared? And BTW, you rock.

Razors Edge said...

Looks delicious! Too bad that finding just pasteurized cream is next to impossible in this city :~(

jrdorsett85 said...

Chef John, great recipe. And South Park was the first thing I thought of when I saw is was Creme Fraiche. That was their best episode EVER.

eve+line said...

I am not sure if we have cultured buttermilk in our supermarket (Singapore). Can I know if yogurt (with live cultures) can be used?

Alina said...

I had the same questions as eve+line :)

Anyway, I can't wait for the strogganoff recipe!

Chef John said...

Yes, cultured yogurt will work!

Anonymous said...

Love it. Do you have a technique to add onion to this and make a sour cream and onion dip?

Chef John said...

Should last a week or two.

scherzo said...

Chef John, this looks delicious! I need help though... I'm living in a country where cultured buttermilk is impossible to find. Is there any way I can make this cultured buttermilk from scratch to then make Crème fraiche??

Anyways, thanks! I always watch your videos and I've cooked up a whole bunch of your recipes countless times!

Brandee P. said...

This is absolutely the best thing I have learned from FoodWishes thus far! Oh and in case you haven't seen the South Park episode where these comments are coming from here it is:

http://www.southparkstudios.com/full-episodes/s14e14-creme-fraiche

grumbleghoul said...

this looks a little familiar. didn't you do this one before? if so, it is still an awesome product!

Jack Parker said...

It's comforting to know that I'm not the only one who goes nuts over Crème Fraiche. Thanks for demonstrating the technique. Someone told me about this some time ago but I didn't trust the information because I couldn't imagine leaving cream unrefrigerated for 24 hours. South Park reference aside (so not my thing), my heartfelt thanks for doing this video.

Now, if we can solve the mystery as to how to make (or get in the US) double cream! That would complete my trifecta of foodie love which includes Crème Fraiche, Double Cream and a great Yellow Curry Sauce. (So far, I only have a "good" yellow curry sauce. Will work on "great" later!)

Tarnation said...

I have made creme fraiche and never had any luck. I have had to put it in a yogurt maker to keep in warm enough to thicken. Can't wait to try your tips.

Steven K. said...

Up until fairly recently, I didn't even know Creme Fraiche existed. Now that I know about it, should I feel bad that I can't taste the difference between creme fraiche & sour cream?

Big Dude said...

Great info. many recipes call for it and I can't find it in the store so this will come in handy.

Chef John said...

Sorry, not sure if you can make your own cultured buttermilk at home. (maybe google?)

Anonymous said...

Bravo! I am going to try this tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

I have trouble finding anything but ultra-pasteurized cream and I have looked and looked. I do get 40% heavy cream (ultra-pasteurized, of course) that is already VERY thick. Do you think it would work. BTW, no problem finding cultured buttermilk.
Thanks for the post. I'll be trying this soon.
Jackie

Chef John said...

it should still work, but my take longer.

Basia said...

Okay, CJ, back home here we're just gonna have to wait for summer before there's anywhere to leave something at 75º!!

Chef John said...

No you don't! :-). My apt is always cold here. I just put in oven near the light in the back. Was perfect.

Anonymous said...

Chef,

I have made Creme Fraiche just by leaving a cup of heavy cream at room temp with a tablespoon of sour cream mixed in for about 8 hours, would your recipe be any better?

Jessica said...

This looks amazing...I need to try this! Thanks for sharing :)

Chef John said...

anon, can't answer that unless I tasted both! You try and tell me ;-)

Anonymous said...

You can use that to make Alsacien Flamecakes. Yummy!

Gordon@PimpThatFood said...

Great Video! I always watch your videos which are cool. This is a great tip you share in here.

Anonymous said...

I just made my first batch of creme fraiche... I didn't think it would work, but it did! I had a bit of a hard time finding a warm spot in my (generally) cold kitchen, but I placed my jar near my furnace and it definitely did the trick. Now I just have to wait to try it while it cools in the fridge...

Thank you so very much for a fantastic recipe and technique!

blogagog said...

Are you pretty sure this stuff isn't just sour cream? Because it tastes identical to sour cream.

chose said...

our supermarkets carry "buttermilk" but is that the same as cultured buttermilk? Does it matter for this recipe?

Chef John said...

must have an active culture, which should be stated on the label. if it isn't I can't tell you if it will work.

Anonymous said...

After the 1st day, it was liquidy at the top, but chunky at the top, after stirring it, it was a consistency just like yours in the video. Am I doing it right?

dahveed said...

Wonderful Video! Well produced and helps clarify a mystery of the food world. It would be interesting to know more about certain food ingredients even if they can't (or shouldn't) be created at home. Like molasses for example. What is it? And Clouted cream?

Of course its really hard to find actual buttermilk these days for many parts of the US.

How does this differ from yogurt? Is it just the cream vs milk, or something else. So many questions...

Rosko said...

Didn't you already make Creme Fraiche about 2 years ago? I'm pretty sure I used a recipe from you when I did it.

Anonymous said...

Is it ok to leave it sit out for longer than the 24 hours? Getting close to the 24 hour mark and it isn't thick yet.

Chef John said...

Yes, you can. The time varies due to temp. It will also thicken more in the fridge. Or the cream you got was ultra pasteurized and it may not get as thick.

Anonymous said...

Will this work as a sour cream substitute in making cakes?

Chef John said...

Yes!

cdb said...

FYI, I made this just the other day using ultra-pasteurized cream (couldn't find it any other way), and it turned out perfect. After only 12 hours it was already thick. I gave it the full 24 on the counter, and then after another 24 in the fridge, the top was extremely thick, like the consistency of whipped butter. But once I stirred it together, it was heavenly. Creamy, delicious, and all the people at my early Cinco de Mayo shindig last night were impressed that I'd made sour cream. Thanks!

Mike said...

I made this the other day also using the ultra pasteurized cream. It worked perfect and tasted YUMMY!

I like to recommend your blog to friends but...then they will know I am not a culinary genius.

shalini said...

i have just made sour cream yesterday and iit has been approx 20 hrs,their is a liqudy residue at the bottom and a big chunk of cream like soft butter.....is it alright??is it ok if i just whip it well??will it turn out??
thank you..

Graeme said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Graeme said...

I decided to make this today. The only glass jar I own is 400ml, but due to a brain fart, I used three tablespoons of buttermilk anyway (I had planned to use slightly less). Do you suppose it will still turn out alright, or should I just start over now?

Emerald_Mara85 said...

This might sound really stupid...
But how to know whether the cream fraiche is spoiled or not?
I never had one before and...

I forgot that the temperature is much hotter here (can go up to 30 C, yours is like 24-27 C) and I waited for 24 hours. Its thick like in the video but since this is all new to me so I don't know. Now its just waiting in the fridge...for another 24 hours.

Chef John said...

I doubt it's spoiled. You'd know. It should Tate like a nice sour cream.

Gary said...

Always wanted to try Creme Fraiche. First tried store-bought...it was almost 6 bucks for 8 oz, but I didn't have time to make it myself. This time I made this full batch. It tastes great on an egg omelette, and mixed with honey on top of fresh berries. Someone said it tastes like cheesecake - and it does! Also mixed it with balsamic to put on an English muffin. Also served it on top of fish...not sure what it wouldn't taste good on!

Thanks Chef!

Gary said...

OK, latest experiment...Creme Fraiche, honey, cocoa powder. Served it over fresh berries...WOW!

Tara said...

can I use home made buttermilk
1 cup milk with 1 tablespoon of vinegar mix and let it sit for five minutes then use in the recipe?

Chef John said...

Nope, you need an active bacteria culture.

Phyrie said...

I made this, and it worked! It's rather like magic, isn't it?
I am also making your Cherry Folditup, but with blackberries. I was thinking to use the creme fraiche on the galette. I think you said somewhere that the creme can be whipped? Is there anything I need to know about how to do that, or should I just treat it like whipping cream?

Thanks for this site. I am very happy to have found it!

Phyrie, in BC, Canada

Chef John said...

Yes! Just whip! Thanks!

Jocelyn K. said...

I want to make your stroganoff recipe for dinner tomorrow night with friends. If I make the creme fraiche now, I won't time to let it sit in the refrigerator for 24 hours if I plan to use it tomorrow. Could I skip the refrigerator step? :)

Chef John said...

It may not get thick or sour enough.

Anonymous said...

I hate South Park with a passion, but I love sour cream! Thanks for the vids and blogging.

-tired of preparing n' eatting the same old thing....

Anonymous said...

Chef John, i live in argentina.. i don't know what buttermilk is here... it there any substitute??

Anonymous said...

Tried the recipe, 48 hours later, the taste is fantastic it's not nearly as creamy as yours. Should I let it sit in the fridge longer, or do I need to bring it out to get the cultures working again?

Hannah Chan said...

If you reserve 3 tablespoons of your homemade creme fraiche and use that for the starter of your next batch (replacing the buttermilk) it will get better and better each time! Similar to a really well aged sourdough starter.

Alec006 said...

Hey chef. If I use cultured yogurt any idea with the amounts??
and If I use yogurt starter?
thanks in advance!

Chef John said...

Sorry, no experience using yogurt for this. You better google.

Alec006 said...

In argentina we have double cream I dunno if you have it there it has 48% of fat VERY thick. what do you think about to use it for the cream fraiche?? thanks chef john

Scones_bite said...

Cooool! Just found a recipe I want to make that calls for crème fraîche and I remembered that you had this post from a while back.

One question... if I don't have coffee filters on hand, what is a good substitute? I was thinking maybe two layers of paper towel with an elastic tied 'round?

Thanks!

Chef John said...

yes that works!

Madonna said...

I don't have a need for this much creme fraiche at one time even if it does keep in the frig. Can I make a half pint and still get a good result? Just because my family is smaller now doesn't mean I don't want homemade. If this is ok to downsize would a tablespoon and a half of buttermilk be sufficient?

BTW, thank you for all you share with us. You makes me think I can cook.

Chef John said...

I don't see any reason it wouldn't work! btw, you can freeze CF. enjoy!

Madonna said...

I did not know you could freeze cf. So is it possible to freeze buttermilk? Although it is cheap I have a difficult time using it up before it goes bad, and I hate to throw it away. Even though I would like buttermilk biscuits everyday, I can't.

george jefferson said...

if you want it to be tangier, do you just add a little more buttermilk? or let it sit out a little longer?

Darlene said...

Yes, you can freeze buttermilk. I do it all the time. I also make my own cultured buttermilk from a store-bought start. I just use 1/2 cup of stuff from the store in a quart jar. fill with milk and let sit out 24 or so hours. I freeze my buttermilk in 1/2 cup portions so that if something happens (like I forget and use all of a batch of buttermilk) I can just start again.

You can just keep re-culturing from the old batch.

hth

Anonymous said...

Chef John, I made this for my Sister-in-law for her Christmas gift. It was AMAZING and scored big points for me with the family! Thank you for foodwishes. This is wondeerful. Merry Christmas!

Talek said...

You might like this John, your video pops up after :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMpBemB3SAI&feature=player_embedded

Shirley said...

Until yesterday, I had never tasted creme fraiche, much less make any. I have been unable to find anything but ultra-pasteurized heavy cream, so I bought some of it. I did 1 cup of it and 2 tbsp cultured whole buttermilk. I put it in a jar in the microwave to sit for 24 hours. (No, I didn't nuke it). I really expected it to fail, but at the end of 24 hours, it was thickening. I put it in the fridge, and this morning, I have this beautiful creme fraiche. In the meantime I found Vermont Creamery creme fraiche at our grocery store yesterday and bought it. It doesn't appear to have anything in it but what it's supposed to have, but what I made is so much better tasting! A little sweeter tasting. I'm so happy to have found your instructions. I doubt I will ever buy sour cream again!

OldGregg64 said...

Ultra-pasturized heavy whipping creme worked fine for this. That is all they had at Wally World. Used their buttermilk too. This came out great. I skipped the Sterilizing step also. I just mixed it all up in a small mason jar, covered with a coffee filter and put it in the hall closet for 24 hours. The closet was never more that 68 degrees, thats where we keep the temp in winter.
I am going to try this with my home made kefir next. Kefir is a lot like buttermilk but it is the probiotic nirvanna. I usually buy kefir cheese at a deli to make tatziki sauce. This would be a lot more convenient.
You rock Chef John!

Anonymous said...

You are the best! I love sour cream but never heard of Crème Fraiche. I can't wait to try this. Thanks!

James said...

I must be doing SOMETHING wrong. I am using an organic non-ultra pasteurized heavy creme, and cultured buttermilk. Im sterilizing the jar, and am putting it in a warm environment. After almost 2 whole DAYS, the best I have been able to get is something more like Mexican creme (runny sour cream).

What am I doing wrong?

Unknown said...

Also... another question: could this work by using the same cultures that one uses to make homemade buttermilk, but just add the culture to the heavy whipping cream?

Chef John said...

Wish I could tell you, but I have no idea! Mine has always worked as shown. Also, never tried to culture BM, so no help there either. Sorry!

Darlene said...

How cold is your house?
I use store-bought cultured buttermilk in ultra-pasteurized milk (all I can get here)and it takes about 2 to 3 days to culture. But it's winter and the house is about 65 degrees. So all of my cultures are slow to culture. Come summer, when the house is 80, they'll all be ready in a day.

Just a thought.

Jamie said...

Any thoughts on using raw milk heavy whipping cream for this recipe? We only drink raw cow's milk :)
Going to try to make it this weekend! Thank you!

Chef John said...

I'm pretty sure it would work.

Anonymous said...

I wonder if you can make a "light" crem fraiche by using half and half with the cultured buttermilk in order to reduce calories. Any ideas? Thx Chef John, this stuff really is that good!

1Bigg_ER said...

No luck finding pasteurized heavy cream. It's all ULTRA.

JShen said...

Just bought whipping cream and buttermilk for a cupcake. So going to make creme fraiche!! I can already imagine it in the creamy salmon and leek pasta I'm gonna serve and also substituting the sour cream in my mushroom soup with it!

snowbear said...

Thanks for the info on he cream.I make yogurt but I adore drinking buttermilk!Now I know how to make my own for drinking ,thank you!Cheers!

RawMountainGirl said...

I have made this several times now and its a HUGE hit at our house !! I use to make dips with,garnish dishes, etc - WONDERFUL stuff and sooo easy!! I find it lasts at least 2 weeks and tastes great still!! (but it gets eaten long before that ! LOL ) however I did make a double batch once and that lasted about 2 weeks...

Anonymous said...

I live in a cold climate and use a thermos to make yogurt and also creme fraiche. Works great!

Anonymous said...

It works! Hail to you, Chef John. You are quite the fellow, in all categories!

Anonymous said...

I somehow made creme fraiche without the buttermilk cause i forgot to put it in but somehow it has the same texture in your video when its done(i didn't taste if it was tangy cause i used it right away), is it possible to make it without the buttermilk or did i just messed it up? I live in the tropics so its hot and quite humid in here so maybe there's natural yeast floating in the air in my kitchen, you know, like your follow the sourdough video, and that can replace the culture in the buttermilk. I also used a piece of tissue and poke several holes into it, instead of using a coffee filter to cover it.

Chef John said...

sounds like u did have it occur naturally!

Anonymous said...

Oh, is that a good thing or bad thing. -(I'm that guy who said that i made creme fraiche without the buttermilk)

Krista said...

This stuff is amazing! I now have my mother hooked on it and she and I are spreading the word. You should have a few more blog viewers soon.

Locomotive_breath said...

Hi Chef

Made this over the weekend and now the wife loves me even more. She's been gorging on the stuff and yes, she did start out with "this tastes like sour cream" but has now graduated to "this is waaaay better than sour creme". She's been putting it on her toast, her Indian stuffed flat bread (paranthas) and I can't wait to make myself an omelet every morning just so that I can have more creme fraiche. As you might have noticed, you really did come up with a winner because a year+ since the post, you are still receiving comments (and praise) at a pretty steady clip for this recipe.

Thank you!

Locomotive_breath said...

Hi Chef

Made this over the weekend and now the wife loves me even more. She's been gorging on the stuff and yes, she did start out with "this tastes like sour cream" but has now graduated to "this is waaaay better than sour creme". She's been putting it on her toast, her Indian stuffed flat bread (paranthas) and I can't wait to make myself an omelet every morning just so that I can have more creme fraiche. As you might have noticed, you really did come up with a winner because a year+ since the post, you are still receiving comments (and praise) at a pretty steady clip for this recipe.

Thank you!

Anonymous said...

Yet more praise. Needed something more than just whipped cream for a dessert topping for some catering. Remembered the Creme Fraiche you did. Made a whole whack of it. So good and it added the needed touch. Thanks again for this and everything you do.

Anonymous said...

cheffie, it makes an awesome base for homemade cream of mushroom soup! yum!

Anonymous said...

Question: My creme fraiche mixture has been sitting in my kitchen for 1 1/2 and it doesn't smell sour but it already thickens. Should i continue until it sits for 2 days or should i put it in the fridge. PS. It's not hot these days in here and i used yoghurt instead of buttermilk, maybe one or both of them are the cause for the delay i have here? Thanks Chef.

Chef John said...

Sorry, I'm not sure what you mean. Check the video again. It only stays out 25 hours and then in the fridge.

Ed Adams said...

Thank you once again. I had no idea until I found your blog what creme fraiche was but I have just made it for the first of many times to come.

Clayton said...

Arg! Our apartment was probably averaging 67 to 68 degrees, and perhaps it is for this reason that the creme fraiche did not set -- is the temperature that sensitive?

I'll try setting it next to the oven light next. Determined!

Clayton said...

Arg!
Our apartment averages about 67 degrees, and I just left the jar on a shelf. The creme fraiche did not set. Was this slightly too low temp the cause? After 24 hours in the fridge, there was a lovely layer of thick cream on top, but the rest was only slightly thickened.
Will try the stove light trick next.
(Does light, or lack of light, contribute the process?)

Love your blog and videos!

love said...

Hi Chef John- great recipe!! I am making creme fraiche pretty much the same way you did, except with yogurt instead of Butter-Cream. I just put it in the fridge and tasted it a little bit- is it normal for it to taste a bit like spoiled cream, or did something go wrong?

Chef John said...

it should smell and taste tangy, a little nutty, and a little sour. It's not supposed to taste spoiled. If it smells unpleasant, it not good.

Dianna Fielding said...

Hi chef John,

What would happen if I used live culture yogurt? It would taste differently, obviously, but would it thicken the same way?

Thanks,

D

Chef John said...

Sorry, not sure! I've never tried yogurt before.

Foodielicious said...

Chef John!! I'm a huge fan of your blog! Awesome work mate! I just watched the creme fraiche S.P episode in the office and was in stitches! Espicially considering that i'm a geologist and total afecianado of the Food Network! :) Oh and I just started a batch of C.F last night, and hoping it works out.

Lemming said...

I just put my buttermilk into the cream! Excited to see the results tomorrow night :)

Toshiko Suisei said...

Dear Chef John, thanks so much for this recipe - I know I won't be buying sour cream again! This Creme Fraiche turned out just as you described and I have enjoyed it as an accessory to your potato pancakes and a few other potato sides, as well as the accent mark on enchiladas, and, thinned with a drop of milk to make the topping for your asparagus soup. Delightful!... but now I need more ways to use buttermilk! ha!

rain.drop said...

Simply delicious and sooooo easy! Thank you Chef!

DSuzR said...

My daughter is lactose intolerant, so we'll have to use lactose-free cream, which I can find. However, I won't be able to find lactose-free buttermilk. Any suggestions? Thanks!

Chef John said...

I'm not positive, but I doubt this would thicken and ferment without regular cream and buttermilk. I believe the lactic acid is what give this it's character. I don't think lactose free will thicken.

Chef John said...

I'm not positive, but I doubt this would thicken and ferment without regular cream and buttermilk. I believe the lactic acid is what give this it's character. I don't think lactose free will thicken.

Greg said...

This Creme Fraiche is so easy to make and a pleasure to the taste buds. There wasn't a single complaint from the family as they savored the peach cobbler, beef stroganoff, and the chicken with dumplings. We tried these all and are so comforted. Thanks John.

Mark Anderson said...

I've been making this continually since I discovered it about a year ago. Had it this morning atop a smoke salmon omelet

I don't boil my containers, though. In brewing beer I was taught to keep everything clean but not necessarily sterile. The idea being that the bacteria that creates the fermentation is strong enough to overcome any stray bacteria. I just wash and rinse thoroughly.

Can't recommend you disregard The Man, though.

Bryan said...

I used this method but found the local cultured buttermilk a little too harsh when I used it. So I bought some commercial creme fraiche from the fancy food store and added it to the cream at around 2-3 tbsp per cup cream (I think I accidentally got whipping cream) and it turned out great and tasted a lot like the original.

So if you have a store bought creme fraiche you like you can extend it with this method.

Spyce said...

I started my crème fraiche with ultra pasteurized heavy cream, and it worked fine. I used what was left over to start another batch. It's really good now, sort of buttery with a little tang. I used it in the Pork Al Latte recipe, and it was delicious. I am done buying sour cream!

McShine said...

You keep saying that it's so much better than store-bought sour cream, but is it significantly better than store-bought creme fraiche? Cause I've been using that for years, and it's not even that much more expensive than sour cream.

philogaia said...

I make this recipe all the time and love it. However I cannot find cultured buttermilk that hasn't then been pasteurized. So I tried it with yogurt instead. It works just great. Can't tell you if it tastes the same but it tastes wonderful! That really is the trick to this. No live culture, no creme fraiche.

Ivor the Engine Driver said...

Now I don't know if you monitor older posts, but I've got a question I'm hoping you could answer.

I made the creme fraiche. But it took me about 2 days before I could refrigerate it. It must have been a combination of the creme I used and the temperature. Is it alright to stay at room temp. like that for 2 days?

I mean, it seems fine now after being in the fridge for a day.

Brian Williams said...

Hi, Chef John
Is there a reason for leaving it out all day at room temp cause I let it get to room temp and then started shaking the jar and it got so think it appeared done to me, stuck it straight in the fridge,,next day tastes just like sour cream to me...Just seeing if there is any benefit to letting it set that long?

Chef John said...

It got thick because you whipped the cream by shaking it! :) Leaving out develops flavor.

Cicilia said...

Hello, Chef John
I tried to make it
And now it gets a little watery on the bottom
Is it spoiled or not since i left for 36 hours?

Chef John said...

Sorry, but I have no way to tell!

Karyn Mastrude said...

Lovin' you, Chef John! Thank you so much for the tips. It worked GREAT and I got the perfect consistency to my homemade Creme Freiche in just 12 hours!


My first order of business is to make Million Dollar Chicken with it and to garnish the top of some homemade sausage chili. (Your version, of course!)


BTW, I love your sense of humor. Don't ever change...keep me belly laughing as I do my happy kitchen dance!

gateau au chocolat said...

u Rock!!! :)

Sam Oakes said...

Chef John,

Can you infuse creme Fraiche with differrent herbs and fruits, if so, which one works the best?

randomloop e. said...

Multi bene!

brian_maita said...

Hi Chef John,

First of all, I LOVE YOU! Can I use the cream before 24 hours after refrigerating?

That you!

Maita

Chef John said...

Sure! Thanks!

ScienceSusan said...

Okay, now quark.

Esther said...

To make buttermilk whip 1 quart of heavy cream and 1 tsp salt until butter forms, the liquid that's leftover is buttermilk! Makes 1 pound of butter :)

Chef John said...

Not sure that will work here, since you need an active bacteria culture in the buttermilk to make the CF!