Thursday, March 31, 2011

These Cherry Folditups Only Sound Easy and Inexpensive

Why am I calling this a cherry folditup, and not a cherry galette, its correct culinary name? Because one sounds like something that's easy to make, and one doesn't.

You may think it's silly to dumb-down the name just so a few more people watching on YouTube will give it a try, but it's very important to me that these recipes are accessible to as many people as possible. Oh, and by the way, did I mention you need to buy a $18 jar of cherries to make it? 

So much for that whole accessibility angle. Yes, I did use the world's most exclusive jarred cherries. Luxardo make's what they claim are the original Maraschino cherries. The deep, dark fruit is candied in Marasca cherry syrup, and I find the taste and texture totally irresistible.

And no, I didn't hit the lottery; I had these on hand because of some recipe testing I was doing for a client, and I couldn't think of any finer way to use them up. If things are going well, here's the Amazon link is case you want to try Luxardo cherries for yourself. However, as I say in the video, any cherry or other fruit pie filling will work beautifully.

As far as the crust goes, we have a couple of surprises for you. I decided to use whole wheat flour, as I wanted a dough that was a little nuttier and rougher around the edges, and this did the trick. I also used some orange vodka I had in the freezer for part of the liquid in the dough.

I'd seen Alton brown do this, and apparently the vodka adds moisture, but doesn't create gluten, and somehow that makes a tender, flakier crust, or something like that. I can’t be bothered to do any more research, but I can say it made one hell of a crust.

Of course, if anyone want to go all food nerd on us and explain what's going on molecularly, I think we'd all pretend to be interested. Enjoy!

Update! I call for whole wheat flour for this, but want to let you know I used the oxymoronically-named King Arthur Unbleached White Whole Wheat Flour. It's a very light wheat flour, and can probably be simulated by using 1/2 regular wheat flour and white flour. 


Ingredients:
6 oz whole wheat flour by weight (about 1 1/3 cup)
6 tablespoons ice cold butter
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 cup ice water (plus 1 tablespoon if not using vodka)
1 tablespoon ice cold orange or plain vodka, optional
1 cup cherry pie filling

View the complete recipe

40 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice recipe, but i have a question: "1/4 ice water" is it 1/4 tablespoon or cup?

Dawn's Recipes said...

Looks amazing! And, just great, now I'm craving $18 cherries. ;) Hey, I've got to try them at least once in my life, don't I? And being that it's my birthday in a couple of days, I'm sure my husband will be forgiving...

Anyway, I thought the vodka just evaporated better than water. I didn't know about the gluten angle. The science geek in me wants to look this up now. Last time I made a pie (cherry, as a matter of fact) I tried the vodka trick. When the dough was at the point that I really wanted it just a little more workable, but I didn't want a tough crust, I threw in a tablespoon of vodka (Ketel One, because that's what I had on hand). It turned out beautifully!

Julie said...

Stand-up comedy/cooking shows, chef John, please!
(I would cross the ocean for that!)
France is fine, by the way, with NOT calling it "galette"...
Thanks a zillion for all the cooking and fun I'm having with you.
You are the cutest chef on planet earth ;) (and I know you're married.I wanna make sure I'm not trying anything here...I just being frank :) Thumbs up if you wanna squeeze his cheeks every time you see him on a video, people!!!

:)

Julie

Anonymous said...

I have done the vodka trick and it does make beautiful, workable dough as long as it has time to chill.
By the way, I was under the impression that this notion originally came from Christopher Kimball and the folks at "Cook's Illustrated".
Jackie

Jack Parker said...

The possibility of ingredients you can use to fold-up in this shell is intriguing... and I'll be experimenting. Food Channel Chef, Alex Guarnaschelli, ate an apple tart similar to this on "The Best Thing I Ever Ate."

I understand not wanting to over-fill the shell but the one you made looked like it only had a few cherries. Is the amount just a personal preference or is there another reason for that?

Not being a drinker, other than the occasional aperitif, I don't have vodka in the house. But, I usually have Limoncello and I've made this pastry using it. It has the same great results.

Steve said...

Chef:

Alton Brown discusses the gluten formation issue in the show "Apple of My Pie". The transcript may be found here:

http://goodeatsfanpage.com/Season11/apple_pie/apple_pie_tran.htm

Patrick said...

Thanks for posting this - I'm going to make two this weekend!

Quick question -

You say .75 cup of filling in the video and 1.0 cup in the written recipe. I know at the end if the day it's not a huge differences, but did you prefer one quantity over the other? I suspect you make it both ways...

Chef John said...

yes a cup is correct. i was short from using in the other recipe

Anonymous said...

Can't use vodka..any substitute do you think?
Thanks(:

Patrick said...

Thanks for the clarification, Chef; I was going to err on the side of "more is better", but sometimes that backfires.

I have to say, I've lost track of the number of compliments I have gotten from friends and family thanks to your recipes and videos.

I'm a visual-learner, and your calm-cool-and-casual demeanor is a tremendous confidence booster!

Anonymous said...

@Anonymous: If you can't use vodka then anything neutral tasting (or complimentary tasting) with a large amount of alcohol in it will produce the same effect. Grand Marnier would work just as well, for example.

@Chef John: How is the milk different from the egg wash? There's more water in the milk, does that make the crust a little denser?

Chef John said...

milk doesn't effect the texture, it just makes for a little lighter glaze, but still cool looking. And u don't have to waste a whole egg ;-)

Anonymous said...

Chef John, I just want to thank you. You've enriched my life no end.

I was cooking a dinner for a girl I was hoping to wow, and I took Chef John's advice, and decided that nothing was too good for her.

I made your cocoa pork with cherry sauce for a main course and this for dessert.

Needless to say I won her heart. And I owe it all to you!

Linda C said...

If I wanted to use rhubarb as a filling instead of cherries, would I need to cook the rhubarb first before putting it in the pastry?
Thanks John!

Chef John said...

Yes you have to cook it with some sugar first until tender.

Anonymous said...

I used appple pie filling which I made myself. It tasted better right out of the oven but was okay the next day too.(: Thanks a bunch

Linda C said...

Great, thanks John! gonna try it today!

Anonymous said...

How much or how big is a cup?

Anonymous said...

Chef John, after watching this I have a request--how about chocolate covered cherries using these Luxardo cherries? I think that sounds too yummy to bear! Margery

Anonymous said...

Hi nice recipe you have here love it. This is my first time @your blog, but not the last I hope :D
I don't use alcohol at all ,so does using water alone would be fine ?
thanks

lostpastremembered said...

Great pie!!! Luxardo makes a great true maraschino liqueur with real marasca cherries... it's delicious so I bet these cherries are as well... what's a little splurge now and then!

Malte said...

My dough is in the fridge atm.
I had some troubles with the units. Used google to calculate oz to dl, that converted to 1.7 dl, but after failing miserable, i tried converting the 1 1/3 cups into dl too, and that was a bout 3 dl. I think i screwed it up, but il find out in 30 mins or so.

Chef John said...

6 oz by weight is 170 grams.

a sweet road said...

This recipe looks really delicious and perfect for a special spring occasion. I'll have to remember those cherries for next time I feel inclined to splurge a bit on ingredients... I'll see if they show up in any grocery stores or specialty shops!

Lorenz said...

Okay, so I am rarely disappointed with your recipes, but this one was an epic fail for me. I don't know if I did something wrong but the whole wheat flower made the whole thing taste really really branny, the dough didn't crack, it was great to handle and bake but it tasted horrible, it felt as though someone was running a sandblaster in my mouth because of how coarse and dry it was. The cherry pie filling I used was absolutely disgusting but that's totally my fault for getting the cheap stuff and not making it myself or shelling out the 18 bucks.
Is your whole wheat flour different than mine? Do you cut it with white flour? Maybe I'm not Californian enough and I don't have much of a palet for bran. Any ideas?

Chef John said...

Sorry! I guess my whole wheat flour was much lighter than yours. I used King Arthurs Unbleached White Whole Wheat Flour, which is pretty light. You probably used a regular whole grain whole wheat which was too rough. Maybe try with all white or 1/2 & 1/2 next time.

Anonymous said...

OMG. Where is SF can I get these cherries? I want to make this next weekend. Any help is greatly welcome. I will go as far as walnut creek to make it just like chef John.

Where,,,,,,,,,,,???? Help ???

Chef John said...

I got mine here! http://www.yelp.com/biz/wine-impression-san-francisco

Anonymous said...

For some reason, I cannot leave this alone. Was this vodka in the pie dough thing really Alton Brown's idea or was it Christopher Kimball and his crew from "Cook's Illustrated" who developed it?

I'm all about giving credit where credit is due. Could someone address this?

Anonymous said...

I first saw it on Good Eats, but this person apparently first read it in Cook's Illustrated:

http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/recipe-review/recipe-review-the-cooks-illustrated-vodka-pie-crust-068851

::shrug::

I expect it was probably Cook's Illustrated, seems more their style.

@the person who doesn't use alcohol: Sure, you can leave the alcohol out and just make the pie crust in the traditional way. Might want to add less water in that case. The point of the alcohol is that it makes the crust easier to work with while still being nice and tender.

Chef John said...

Yes, I didn't say AB invented the technique, just that's where I heard about it. If people say ATC invented it then good for them! :-)

Anonymous said...

My dough was really hard to fold, i used the same flower as you did too. What do you think the problem could have been?

Susan Chin said...

Hi Chef John,

I'm interested to make this recipe, but I'm not sure how much vodka should I use. Hope you to get your reply soon.

Thanks,
Susan Chin

Chef John said...

It's 1 tablespoon (the ing are always under the video)

Susan Chin said...

Thank you Chef John for your prompt reply. Yes, I know the ingredients are always under the video but I didn't see the vodka quantity. The recipe ingredient just said 1/4 cup ice water plus 1 tbsp if not using vodka. So that's why i'm not sure that's for water quantity or vodka. Anyway Chef, thanks once again for your reply and thank you too for the recipe.


Regards,
Susan Chin

Chef John said...

gotcha, yes, it's 1/4 c water plus the 1 T vodka. enjoy!

JR said...

Chef John. I think you should update the ingredient list, as making this with whole wheat flour makes this dessert...taste...well....a heated up Power Bar with fruit filling in it. It wasn't until I read the comments in which you stated what brand you used and suggested using a half white flour and half wheat flour solution that I realized that's where I may have went wrong. This is my second day in a row making this with the modification, and hoping for the best.

Beautiful Stranger said...

I just Tried it chef john, after failing 4 times on pies this time was a hit i was sooooooo happy feeling like i've finally won my battle against pies :D Thanks a million and greetings from Egypt :D

Thien said...

Hello! So I can't get my hands on whole wheat flour right now but am I able to use plain? Or anything else? Will it work the same?

Chef John said...

any flour works!