Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Turkey Gravy with Porcini Mushrooms and Marsala Wine – Make-Ahead So You Don’t Get Behind

They say timing is everything; to which I would add, “was” everything, and “will be” everything. So, with that in mind I present this “make-ahead” turkey gravy with porcini mushrooms and Marsala wine.

The Thanksgiving Day kitchen is a busy, hectic scene that can intimidate even the most experienced cooks. As dinnertime approaches, you’re flying around the kitchen trying to get everything to the table, hot, looking delicious, and most importantly, on time.

While the turkey is resting under foil, you’re mashing potatoes, reheating sweet potatoes, warming rolls, and probably trying to finish a gravy. That’s a lot of stuff going on, and one reason new cooks are so afraid to try a big holiday meal.

However, by doing your gravy ahead of time, you make that last-minute production a lot easier, and your other offerings will benefit from the extra attention. That’s not to say I want you to throw away all those lovely turkey pan juices sitting in your roasting pan. Time permitting of course, strain them into a saucepan, boil them down, and add them to this sauce.

This recipe is made for adaptation, so feel free to use a drier white wine, sherry, or none at all. I highly recommend the caramelized porcini mushrooms, which are easy to find dried in any large grocery store, but you can also use any fresh varieties with delicious results. Anyway, if you’re looking to “gourmet up” this year’s turkey gravy, I hope you give this a try. Enjoy!



Turkey Gravy Ingredients (makes about 3-4 cups gravy):
For the turkey neck stock:
2 tsp vegetable oil
3-4 turkey necks
1 onion
1 rib celery
1 carrot
1/3 cup Marsala wine, or white wine
2 quarts cold water
2 garlic cloves
1 bay leaf
1/4 oz dried porcini mushrooms
For the sauce:
1/4 cup butter
1/4 oz dried porcini mushrooms
3 tbsp flour
about 6 cups of the reserved turkey neck stock
2 tbsp heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste

26 comments:

K. F. Peters said...

Won't you get some of the grit from the dried porcini mushrooms into your stock if you add them directly as you show?

I've used dried porcini mushrooms before for a liver pate and the do generate a lot of fine dirt when they are reconstituted.

Chef John said...

You could get some, depending on the brand. These were grit-free, but you can rinse, or better yet, strain the stock through a fine sieve to be safe.

Sandra from Montreal said...

That looks wonderful; my mouth is literally watering! The final plate looked amazing. What was the sexy-looking green stuff?

Chef John said...

Creamed spinach. Thanks!

lomography said...

Can I eat with Thai food, I will try

Stelio said...

Chef John Hi this is Stelio big fan of yours. I love the Turkey gravy you made and will definitely do it but I'm not sure I know how you made that liquid you added after you saute the turkey necks with the mirpoix. Thanks for posting right on my blog. cheers and have a good day.Stelio.

Chef John said...

I didn't make it. It's the marsala wine and then the water.

Jenna said...

Hi Chef John, I've been faithfully using your turkey and gravy recipes for a couple years and plan to try this one this year. Quick question. I need to cook alcohol free. Would it be worth my while to deglaze with something like apple cider or just skip it and go with water? Thank you!

Rookie said...

I'm understanding that you would make the stock ahead of time and then make the sauce the day of, but would it still be as tasty of you made the sauce in it's entirety the day before and just reheated it?

Anonymous said...

thin some sauce with sand?

Chef John said...

any grain drop to the bottom of the bowl, which you would obviously not use. Come on!

Anonymous said...

I WAS ALSO WONDERING IF THIS GRAVY CAN BE MADE A COUPLE OF DAYS AHEAD. THE DAY BEFORE THE HOLIDAY SEEMS LIKE A LOT OF TIME.

Chef John said...

Yes! You can make this all a day or two before, no problem!

Vicki W said...

Is there some way I can get the whole recipe, not just ingredients, in a format I can print out?

Chef John said...

No we don't. But I think allrecipes is working on it.

Chef John said...

No we don't. But I think allrecipes is working on it.

Dahveed said...

Yum, its sounds excellent. The perfect cure for slightly dry turkey...

Of course, the most important aspect of any sauce is the stock. Get lazy with that and you ruined the perfect sauce.

Is there a technical difference between a sauce and a gravy or are they one in the same?

Chef John said...

Gravies are made from pan drippings, so this is technically a sauce.

Kelly said...

Hey, Chef, I noticed you are using the Le Creuset. Just wondering if you have tried the Lodge version, and if you judge the French stuff to be worth the added expense.

I haven't used either; the similar cast iron pan I have is not coated, and just like Henry Ford said, is available in any color you like, as long as it is black. It works fine, of course, but it can be difficult to see how well things in it are browning. But not so much that I wish to drop a couple of bills on a new pan.

I have read mixed reviews on the Lodge stuff, but I have read mixed reviews on the Le Creuset stuff as well. At least I know the finish on my old trusty iron pot will not crack. I am tempted,though, to try the Lodge, as I like my other Lodge pans, and their version is like 1/5 of the price of the one you are using in this video. Any thoughts?

Chef John said...

I've used lodge, and they work fine.

Anonymous said...

Vikki asked for a printed out copy. I was doing this for myself anyways, so here you go!
BTW...Thanks, Chef!


Turkey Gravy Ingredients (makes about 3-4 cups gravy):
For the turkey neck stock:
2 tsp vegetable oil
3-4 turkey necks
1 onion
1 rib celery
1 carrot
1/3 cup Marsala wine, or white wine
2 quarts cold water
2 garlic cloves
1 bay leaf
1/4 oz dried porcini mushrooms
For the sauce:
1/4 cup butter
1/4 oz dried porcini mushrooms
3 tbsp flour
about 6 cups of the reserved turkey neck stock
2 tbsp heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste

Brown turkey necks on both sides
Add marcoix(celery carrots and onions)
5-6 minutes, then deglaze with marsala, or dry white wine if you want it less sweet.--→NO COOKING WINE!!!
Raise heat to high, and boil down about half
Add cold h2o, bay leaf, garlic and ¼ oz of mushrooms
When it comes to simmer, lower the heat to low so you have a gentle simmer.
Skim any foam
Cover, but crack an inch
Simmer for 4-5 hours
Strain, transfer to a container and let it cool
Refridgerate if needed
Soak the rest of the mushrooms and soak in warm water, warm enough to dice.
Dice them and throw into sauce pan with butter, and caramelize them
Til they look like bacon bits.
Dump in flour and stir over medium heat, 3 minutes
Whisk in turkey neck stock. Slow!
Raise heat to med high
Reduce down; keep stirring.
Medium, med high
Wherever you think it’s thick enough.
Add pepper, salt and drizzle of cream to taste.
And as always…
Enjoy!

Chef John said...

Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Couldn't find turkey necks in several grocery stores, so I substituted chicken drumsticks, with most of the skin removed. Also deleted wine because some guests cannot have alcohol. Here's hoping it turns out as well as yours, Chef John.

GPLongwood said...

My stock reduced much more than I thought (about 2 cups). Can I make up the difference with chicken stock or water or a little of both?

Thank you and have a wonderful Thanks Giving:-)

Chef John said...

Yes!

JuStAcEy said...

Chef John, you're the best. I loved this recipe, as well as your blog. I frequent it every night, browsing through your recipes; it's quite therapeutic! Thanks again for all the work you do for our enjoyment. If I may suggest some more kale added recipes and a homemade chicken pot pie that would be very much appreciated! Cheers!