Sunday, December 9, 2012

Apparently Size Doesn’t Matter for Prime Rib "Method X"

This is what our 6-pounder looked like. Would a
20 pounder work as well? Spoiler Alert: Yes.
The most common question after we posted our now famous “Method X” for making perfect prime rib was “will this work with much bigger, full-size roasts?” Since I'd only used the method on smaller specimens, I was hesitant to green-light much larger pieces of beef without having tested it myself.

Well, thanks to Bill in Salt Lake City, we now have visual proof that this great technique does work on the big boys. Here’s what the fearless cook had to say:

“Your recipe does indeed work on larger bone-in prime rib roasts. I followed the recipe to the tee, on three 18 to 21 lb. roasts using three different ovens in three separate ski condo ovens, all with different thermostats. All came out perfectly. I had 29 very pleased snowmobilers!”

As everyone knows, there are few groups harder to please than a bunch of starving, probably drunk snowmobilers, so this must have really been amazing. Below you’ll see pictures of Bill’s fine work, along with the video showing this easy method. By the way, after seeing the size of Bill’s slices, if you ever get invited to one of his prime rib dinners, you should definitely go. Thanks for sharing, Bill!

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Prime rib is very expensive, so no matter what method you use (traditional or Method X), you should always have a probe-style thermometer inserted so that the internal temp can be monitored, to avoid any chance of over-cooking. Set the probe alarm (125 F. for medium-rare) just in case, and pull the roast from oven even if there's still time left on the timer.




66 comments:

Robeerto said...

I first used this method (without the butter) in 1972 to cook a 7 pound boneless roast beef. I don't remember for sure, but I think the temp was "as high as the oven will go" for 5 minutes a pound plus two hours with the oven off, no peekie. It was perfect. It's about time for me to try it again. Thanks for the reminder.

Z3NF1N1TY said...

Looks fantastic! What adjustment should I make if I wanted to target a doneness closer to medium? I have a feeling just letting it sit longer in the oven may not be enough.

Chef John said...

Sorry, never tested for med.

Robert Prinzing said...

Chef John, love your wed site. This recipe is fantastic. My wife likes her meat more well done, and I have the answer for your other posters. Take that wonderful Au Jus and put the sliced meat in it while it is on the stove at a low simmer. The meat will cook quickly, stays moist, and best of all adds more flavor to the Jus.

Robert Prinzing said...

Chef John, love your web site. This recipe is awesome. My wife likes her meat more well done too, so here is what I came up with. Use that wonderful Au Jus, just put the sliced meat that you want more well done in the juice and let it cook a little longer. Keeps the meat moist, and adds more flavor to the juice.

Steven Mon said...

I bought me a 7.12 lb (3 ribs) roast for Christmas and I can't wait to try this out!

JennJenn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
JennJenn said...

This looks amazing! Just curious...is it really ok to leave raw meat out at room temp for 6+ hours?

P.S. LOVE your recipes and videos!

Chef John said...

Yes, it's ok! :)

Gerry Graham said...

I LOVE prime rib. Watching this video actually made my my water. What a beautiful dish!

Gene Hoyas said...

Chef John,

My wife purchased a 12.5 lb bone-in prime rib roast for Christmas supper. It's a HUGE roast and I have 2 questions:

1. There will be 8 people at this supper - will half the roast be sufficient?

2. Assuming I cook the whole roast, according to the formula you give (5 minutes per pound of room temperature meat at 500 degrees), is it possible that a full hour in the oven at 500 degrees will result in the outer part of the roast over-cooking?

Please advise.

Chef John said...

I can only tell you that it's always worked for me. Yes, that should be enough, but not much extra. Enjoy!

David Golembeski said...

Chef John,

I've used your method before with standing rib roasts of all sizes, but this year's Christmas guest list is large enough for two ten pound rib roasts. (I couldn't find a 20 pounder!) What, if any, adjustments to the recipe should I make for two roasts in the oven at the same time? Should I still use 10 lbs x 5 minutes or a little more since there are two roasts? Hate to have the holiday meal blow up in my face in front of 18 guests. Thank you and Merry Christmas!

Chef John said...

Sorry, but not sure how 2 roasts would effect the formula!

LShearerNH said...

How long should I leave a 14 lb. roast out to come to room temp? Doen't it become a food safety issue at some point?

LShearerNH said...

I've seen another method very similar to this but it says to turn the oven back on for a 1/2 hour or so at 325 at the end just to warm to meat up a bit. Wouldn't this help to make the end pieces a little more done for those that like it that way?

Vera said...

I made this recipe with a 7 pounder. Turned out perfect. Then I attempted a 21 pounder. My math and temps were correct, however the meat came out well done. So sad! I also noticed that the big roast came out a lot hotter than the small one.

Chef John said...

Sorry to hear! Like i've said, I've never done a big one, so I can't personally verify, but I've received many emails that say it did. Not sure why not for you.

Chef John said...

Btw, I think I'll add a note to the recipe that no matter what method you use for the prime rib, you should always have a probe thermometer inserted so that the internal temp can be monitored to avoid any chance of over-cooking. Set the alarm for 125 for MR just in case, and pull from oven even if there is still time on the timer.

Chris Knight said...

I tried the recipe on a 20.5 pounder. 50 minutes in, I noted the temperature for the probes in the center was at ~100 and the house had enough smoke. I turned the oven off and left it closed. Before the 2 hours was up, the internal temp hit 130, and I pulled it out of the oven. It ended up coasting up to 139 internal temp.

Anyways, best prime rib ever, each of the 16 guests gave their compliments. Thanks for the recipe, great success!

Berry said...

Can this recipe be applied to a boneless roast?

Lisbão, Pedro said...

This was my first Chef John recipe (excluding the harmless, if-you-err-it's-ok ones).

I did it with a 9 pound rib for Christmas, and people were impressed. Seriously, with people asking for "the secret" and whatnot.

Thanks Chef John! I hope my guests will show up here and cook your stuff as well, for I will!

Shelly Ngo said...

Chef John!! I've been following your blog/YouTube channel for quite some time now and I'm just amaze at how your recipes turn out. Today, I attempt my FIRST ever prime rib dinner for Christmas and I was SOO scared that I was gonna mess up a very expensive meat/not be able to feed my dear parents and siblings.

I followed your "method X" recipe and my prime rib turned PERFECT. However, I didn't use a bone-in though. Thank you so much encouraging people like myself to try new recipes. I have posted my prime rib pic below!

http://distilleryimage10.s3.amazonaws.com/c41967884efa11e2939222000a9f1385_7.jpg

David Yaffee said...

Thanks Chef John!!! My Prime Rib & Au Jus turned out perfect thanks to your recipes!!

Susanne Bob Dudley said...

Chef John, I am going to try this tomorrow with a 9.5 pound bone-in. At the risk of over-kill, the 2 hour with heat turned off cooking after the 500 degrees at 5 minutes per pound is standard for all sizes of meat??

Thanks !!
B&S

EDALBNUG said...

I tried the recipe over the holiday but I felt the formula works much better for a room temperature that is much higher than what I had in my kitchen. My kitchen was around 65F on average when I did the roast but the 8.0lb rib rack I left out in the kitchen for 8 hours (wrapped with food wrap) was still only 55F internally when I started cooking. It took an extra 1.5 hours for my roast to reach 125F with the oven at the lowest heat (175 for my GE gas oven) kept on and off throughout that extra time period. Maybe it was because my oven was venting out the heat super efficiently. I noticed the oven temperature dropped below 150F within 1.5hr since I turned off the oven. The rib turned out excellent but I felt guilty for having a group of hungry friends wait an extra hour.

rock said...

The recipe worked for me and my family on Christmas. We had a 10 lb roast. The exterior was a little charred and roasting at 500 degrees for 50 minutes put a decent amount of smoke in the kitchen but the roast was a perfect medium rare. Thanks chef!

Jeannie said...

Hey John just wanted to thank you for your fabulous method - even at my age had always wondered how restaurants made these great cuts of meat so perfectly - did this for Christmas and my 9 lb rib roast turned out picture perfect - next tried the method on a top round roast and again it was perfect - a million thanks!

Gary Dickens said...

Tried this method on a 1.6# London Broil. Pounded out the meat
with a large rubber mallet (both sides) and added minced garlic, minced onion, and a little Worchestershire sauce to one side. Rolled it up tight, cooked @ 500 for 8 min. then turned off oven. At 1 hour 15 min. it was a perfect 120 degrees. Let rest 20 min. and it was a beautiful pink medium rare. The neighbors said it was better than the prime rib we recently had, thanks Chef John for making me look like a genius!

steve from branson said...

I tried this method yesterday with a two rib 6.5 pound roast. It was tough toward the end not to open the oven, but I trusted Chef John.
When I carved the first slice it was perfect. Just like here on the blog. Now great medium rare prime rib isn't something I have to go out to eat, I can get professional results here at home thanks to Methox X.

Michelle in NC said...

Since I found this recipe on your site, this is the ONLY recipe I use for prime rib. Also works great on other cuts of beef. I am just curious on what your thoughts would be on doing a smaller lean pork roast using this method. We like our pork medium at the most. Thinking about trying it & cooking it at 500 a little longer, then do everything else the same way. I know you are going to say you havent tried it, I am just wanting to know if you have any suggestions? It will be trial & error, & I when I perfect it, I will send you the results.

Chef John said...

Yes, never tried! Not sure the advantage with this cut, but let me know how it comes out!

MIKEAL PARK said...

if you are putting two 5 lb roast in the oven at the same time would you mark it at 5 min x 5 lb or 5 min x 10 lb?

Jan Frederick said...

Fabulous method....FOOL PROOF....no matter the size. Mine was 20.14 lbs

Yvette Watson said...

Hi chef- I am cooking a 12.29 prime rib . Will this method still work no bone ? Thanks

Chef John said...

Sorry, but I've never tried w/o bone! You can check comments on org post, as someone may have done it.

Kathleen Wingerson said...

Will this method work for a 2lb prime rib?

Chef John said...

Theoretically, but never tried one that small!

Mary Matero said...

Cooked an 18# prime rib for Christmas dinner. It was perfect. We were a little nervous that after 90 min at 500 the internal temp was only 75. It ended up reaching medium rare temp in under 2 hours. It was the best and easiest roast we've ever prepared.

Ted Peck said...

I used this recipe after researching it online. We were cooking a 27lb prime rib for xmas. I was very concerned that the beef would be over cooked or totally rare! I went by the recipe,calculated the exact amount of time needed. Because we had quite a few older guests, I did add 15 minutes to the calculated time. I didn't want the meat to be rare! We were pleasantly suprised Everyone thought it was great, some of them may have preferred it a little more rare! The next time I won't add any extra time and it will be perfect! Thank You

Care Ren said...

I am in UK & have a gas oven, the hottest temp is 9 = 450 f My question is would it work in a gas oven as the cool quicker than a Electric oven

Carlos Gregory said...

Just picked up a 22lb standing rib roast....hope this method works !! $200 chunk of beef ! Have you done a large 7 bone roast Chef John ?!

Chef John said...

I've heard it works, but I've never done one that big with it. I'd keep a probe thermometer in it to monitor! You can always pull early, or add gentle heat as need to get your perfect internal temp. Enjoy!

Kristine Byrne said...

Chef John - does this method work with a dry aged prime rib? I've been dry aging mine for about a week. Thanks!

Chef John said...

It should! Enjoy!

Darren Weinstock said...

I understand the method you have. One question I have is why is 125 rate and the USDA says 145. Ultra conservative by USDA? It's a roast. Also what temp is room temp 64? I'm leaving my 8# roast out on the counter for 6 hours. Is that what u do?

Richie McDonough said...

Chef John first I have to say I love your videos! My question is I really don't want it that pink what should I do??

Chef John said...

No time to explain USDA, but 6 hrs should be fine!

Gary Dickens said...

Been using this method ever since reading about it here. If I want it a little more done, I add 1 minute more cooking time per pound (6 minutes/lb.)

Mark McGrail said...

Hi John. I love your site. I've cooked many prime rib roasts. I had an 8 lb roast. I cooked it for 40 minutes at 500 degrees Fahrenheit. I put onions, celery and carrots as a bed under it. It burned. The meat turned out fine but everything else was too burnt so couldn't use that to make any au jus. I normally cook it at a slow temperature insude or I smoke it in my smoker.

Angela said...

Just followed this method exactly for a 14.21 lb. prime rib and it was perfect! Ours took less than the 2 hours with the oven off by a whopping 30 min. so we took it out and tinfoil tented it while other dishes finished cooking. Was totally delicious. Thanks so much!!!

Chang Kyoung Ha said...

As usual~ Thank you a lot for your great fool proof recipes!
I have tried several different methods to cook this joint. Indeed, I have to say this method THE RECIPE to rule them all.
Served this for Saturday dinner for flat mate and I have totally become a legend.

The funny thing is that everyone is thinking I used some super complex method (somthing French-ish) to produce this result.

Michelle in NC said...

Hi Chef John, it's me again. Tried this method yesterday with a 4.2 pound semi-boneless leg of lamb. It was awesome!! Perfect medium rare. So far every kind of meat, any size that I have tried using this method has turned out great. Thank you so much for posting this!

JoAnn Stack said...

Chef John, I know you haven't tried this method on a 21-lb roast but others are confirming it works. I'm just concerned that the outside will be completely charred after 100+ minutes at 500 degrees.

I really don't want to risk making $200 worth of beef jerky. Would it be better to cut the roast in half and cook it in two pieces?

Mike said...

Chef John,

I am a hobbyist cook, and use your recipes all of the time. Admittedly, this will be my first time ever trying a prime rib. Due to the expense, I have avoided cooking prime rib in the past. I have a 7.14 pound prime rib, but it is boneless. It appears others have try this method and it worked on boneless prime rib. What do you think? Should I make any adjustments or followed the recipe as you have laid it out?

Kristine Byrne said...

I tried this method last year with a 20# prime rib (bone in) and my thermometer failed me horribly and it turned out well done on the ends, and a medium-well in the middle. Be sure you get a very good thermometer for this method! Stress on VERY good thermometer.

This year though, another 20#er, I went slow low - 200 degrees for 5 hours, pulled it when it reached an internal temp of 120, let it rest and then blasted it at 550 for 10 mins to get a nice crust. Internal temp was 127 on one end to 130 on the other. It was perfect. If I do another, smaller one that isn't $300 I'll try this method again.

Gayleen said...

Hi I ended up with 2 5 lb prime ribs. For the cal said is it like 1 10 lb.
Thanks for the help

Roger Buckthal said...

This is BS! I’ve tried other Chief John’s recipes with great results. But this recipe is a crap-shoot. It has too many variables to really be reliable, and, if you just think about it, it can’t scale with larger pieces of meat – I’ve tried and ruined a $100 prime rib! In addition, ovens are all different; this receipt assumes the heat loss of your oven matches CJ’s… and that might not be the case – as it is for me.

In any case, always use a meat thermometer. Ignore the two hour rule and take it out at 125 degrees.

My only success was with a 2-bone – just as Chief John’s video – but the roast was done after about one hour of oven-off time. My first attempt, blindly believing the 2-hour rule resulted in a nice, well-done, tough and chewy, $80 prime rib that we fed to the dog…

My last attempt, with a 10lbs 4-bone, resulted, again after only one-hour oven-off time, in the outer layer over-cooked to about 2-inches, but the center was correct (only because I took it out using its temperature, not time).

Just think about it. Bigger prime ribs get longer (more bones) and NOT proportionally thicker. Cooking in a traditional heat based oven (ie, not a microwave) cooks from the outside to the inside. Cooking the 5lb 2-bone for 25 minutes result in a perfect 1” browned outside layer. Cooking a 10lb 4-bone for 50 minutes is crazy! The results the twice the ‘brown’ on the outside, read over-cooked outside layer, to about 2-inches. Too much.

Now, for oven-off time. This receipt assumes your oven cools down at the same rate as CJ’s. It might work for the traditional electric in-wall ovens. But a warning for the few Wolf range owners…. Your oven stays hot! Two hours is way, way too much. USE A THEROMETER. About one hour.

Here’s a simpler recipe. Pre-heat to 500 degrees. Insert oven-proof thermometer into center. It doesn’t matter what the weight is, 25 minutes at 500 degrees. Turn off oven. Take beef out when internal temperature is 125. (anywhere between one to two hours after you turn off the oven)

Chef John said...

I'm so confused, since the bottom of the post has an "IMPORTANT NOTICE" that warns...

"Prime rib is very expensive, so no matter what method you use (traditional or Method X), you should always have a probe-style thermometer inserted so that the internal temp can be monitored, to avoid any chance of over-cooking. Set the probe alarm (125 F. for medium-rare) just in case, and pull the roast from oven even if there's still time left on the timer."

You must have missed that part. Trusting any P.R. method without monitoring constantly with a probe thermometer is crazy.

By the way, I get more "this method was amazing"" emails from this recipe than anything we've ever posted.

Gary Dickens said...

This method has never failed me, however, I have found that 45 minutes with the oven off is perfect for me. If you don't start small, tweak the recipe, then proceed with more exotic, bigger cuts, as with ANY recipe, blame yourself. Chef John even warned everyone what to do, and not to do, and what to watch out for. You obviously are NOT a cook.

Roger Buckthal said...

Yes, yes, I was telling my story about NOT using a thermometer the first time and got a well done prime rib at the 2 hour mark – despite using ‘science’ to compute the cooking time. Thus reiterating your warning for others to heed.

And my experience that 500 degrees for 50 minutes for a 4-bone, 10 lbs prime rib results in the outside being way over cooked… so, it’s my opinion – and experience - that this recipe only works for a 2-bone prime rib.

So, other than the 5 minutes per pound at 500 degrees doesn’t work for a big prime rib, and the 2 hours may or may not be right, it’s a great recipe.

… and, ‘this method never fails me’ Gary… yet it’s only 45 minutes oven-off time for you. I’d say that’s NOT THE RECIPE!!! The recipe calls for two hours! (if you plan the rest of your meal to be ready at the two hour mark, your prime rib will be cold) Thus, you admit the 2-hour thing is bogus (and you are clearly real cook!).

Look, I’m just trying to relate my experiences so others won’t need to screwup the way I did.

Chef John said...

All I can say is that this recipe has been tried and reviewed 418 times and has a 4.7 out of 5 rating. Believe me, if this method didn't work as shown, that rating wouldn't be even close to that high. Also, you can check out the photos of people doing larger roasts that look amazing.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/221958/chef-johns-perfect-prime-rib/

Becky said...

I have been wanting to make a prime rib roast for years. Finally, after looking at your recipe and watching the Vid, I bit the bullet and plunked down 70 bucks for a beautiful roast. Here are my results. THANK you Chef John..you are awesome!

RESULTS
1/23/2016

I adjusted the recipe according to my roast size

My Roast Size: 7.26 lbs. The desired Internal temp is 125°F for med/rare

Prepare with Chef John’s recipe ingredients and insert digital thermometer

Preheat oven to 500°F Time to cook roast @ 500 °@F: 7.26x5 lbs. = 36.3 min
At 36.3 min the internal temp of roast: 67°F

Turn oven off!

Lots of bubbling and smoke alarm signals. Smelled wonderful!

Internal Temp of 125°F reached at 2hrs and 20.5 min

Total time for this roast is: 3 hours total

PERFECT!

Becky said...

RESULTS
1/23/2016

I adjusted the recipe according to my roast size

My Roast Size: 7.26 lbs. The desired Internal temp is 125°F for med/rare

Prepare with Chef John’s recipe ingredients and insert digital thermometer

Preheat oven to 500°F Time to cook roast @ 500 °@F: 7.26x5 lbs. = 36.3 min
At 36.3 min the internal temp of roast: 67°F

Turn oven off!

Lots of bubbling and smoke alarm signals. Smelled wonderful!

Internal Temp of 125°F reached at 2hrs and 20.5 min

Total time for this roast is: 3 hours total

PERFECT!

Craig said...

So i just did this. With a 14 pounder, for Easter. This was 6 ribs. And let me say that I've used this recipe for 2 ribs many times, and it's PERFECT. Whoever said this doesn't scale for a larger roast, is dead on. Chef John, you are awesome, but your rebuttal that "i've got a note at the bottom that says follow the thermometer" doesnt cut it... it's an afterthought. You focus on the "math" and people are following it, to their detriment. And I agree with the poster who says that if you're planning on eating at, let's say, 4 pm, based on the 2-hour rule, you're out of luck. Chef John, it's not your responsibility to do this, but perhaps it should be: cook until XXX degrees at 500, and then keep in oven until 125. And for the following size roasts, those two times should be XX minutes and YY minutes, for a total of ZZZ minutes.

Just a sugggestion! And your herbes de provence idea is off the charts, creating an AWESOME crust!

JoanT said...

I have a gas oven. Should I adjust the recipe times? The gas oven seems to cool down quicker so I'm wondering if the 2 hours with the oven off will have the same results as electric ovens.