Monday, February 11, 2013

Grand Marnier Soufflés – Rising to the Occasion on Valentine’s Day

Presenting this gorgeous Grand Marnier soufflé to your Valentine at the end of a romantic dinner would certainly impress, but imagine actually making this while they watch.

What a golden opportunity to show off your cooking skills, and a flair for the dramatic; not to mention the countless innuendos and double entendres such a scene would afford. Afraid it won’t turn out, and you’ll completely embarrass yourself? Too bad! No guts, no glory, and by “glory” we mean…glory.

The good news is, contrary to popular belief, and many cartoons, soufflés are actually very easy to make. I hope after a few viewings of this video, and maybe a practice run or two, you’ll realize just how simple this really is. Of course, to make things a little exciting you can over-fill these like I did, which can cause some wild and unpredictably shaped soufflé tops.

I think they still look super cool, but if you stop filling a 1/4-inch from the top, they generally will rise a little straighter. Having said that, anyone who’d complain about the shape of a soufflé top has some serious issues, and should probably be asked to leave immediately.

By the way, I do have a Crème Anglaise video recipe in the works, but for now you’ll have to rely on the simple written recipe below. As I mention in the clip, this is an extremely impressive dessert “as is,” but when you pierce the top of that hot, steaming soufflé, and pour in the silky, sexy sauce…well, you saw the video. Let’s just say it’s a very nice touch.

Speaking of nice touches, if you’re still looking for that extra special Valentine’s Day dessert for your extra special Valentine, I hope you’ll put aside your fears and give this a go. You really should get lots of compliments. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 2 Grand Marnier Soufflés:

2 (8-oz) heat-proof ramekins, brushed inside with melted butter and coated with sugar.
Note: Mine were closer to 7-oz, which is why I overfilled them as you saw. This amount of batter should fill two 8-oz ramekins. Amounts may vary depending on volume of your eggs/meringue, so don’t be surprised if you have a little more or less.
2 large eggs, separated
1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons melted butter
1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cold milk
1 teaspoon freshly grated orange zest
1 tablespoon Grand Marnier
1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup white sugar
powdered sugar to garnish finished souffles

View the complete souffle recipe

Crème Anglaise Sauce:
(Makes about 1 cup)
1 cup heavy cream
1/3 cup white sugar
2 large egg yolks
1 tbsp Grand Marnier
1/4 tsp vanilla extract
Whisk everything together in a small, but heavy saucepan. Place over med-low heat, and cook, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula being scraped across bottom, until the mixture is hot, and thickens slightly. The mixture should not come to a simmer (but close). The temp should be around 180 degrees F. when it’s done. Remove from heat, strain to remove any over-cooked particles of egg, and let cool.  If you want, you can add some fresh orange zest to the sauce as it cools. Serve ice cold with hot soufflé.

View the complete sauce recipe

58 comments:

MyFriendsCallMeRed said...

My hubby isn't a big fan of orange flavors. Any suggestions for a nice substitute? Maybe Disaronno (amaretto)?

Chef John said...

Can't comment on the taste, but any liquor would work the same. Enjoy!

Sarah.Maratovich said...

Can we just leave out the liquor all together and maybe substitute with a little extra vanilla extract? Thanks for the recipe!

cookinmom said...

Hey Chef, does your better half know your posting this kinda stuff? Oh, that's right, she's in the other room. Has she seen this yet or are you going to surprise her?? You're in troublllleee!! ;0)

Nick said...

looks good chef john.

how early can I make the batter and the english cream?

Chef John said...

You can make the cream a day or 2 ahead. I've heard you can make the batter hours ahead, but I've never tried that.

Chef John said...

Yes, you can leave out the booze and add a little more vanilla.

Unknown said...

really??? 1T+ 2t flour & sugar? fuck it, i'm doing 2T. YOLO!

see what you do chef john? you've turned me into a rebel

Unknown said...

You can NOT make the batter hours ahead, it will collapse...
You can make everyting ahead though, without mixing the eggwhites in, I would even beat the eggwhites minutes before mixing.
The other stuff can be prepared..

Ed Adams said...

Grand Marnier makes a vanilla flavored liqueur that would be an awesome substitute!

Ed Adams said...

Flashback a year ago and an amazing sexually filled chocolate souffle recipe and one Mary F who will forever live on in infamy on your website. Okay nothing like a sentence fragment to make a point is there, LOL. Thanks again for all the great recipes and I can't wait for all the fringe benefits that come with trying this souffle.

Monica said...

I plan to make this for V day
Thanks

Daniel Levine said...

I heard that instead of making creme anglaise you could just melt good quality vanilla ice cream and people wont know the difference. Is this true?

Chef John said...

Yes, that's true with real homemade ice cream. Many commercial brands contain stabilizers and stuff that makes is watery when melted.

Eric Pepple said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Dr. P said...

This looks really fantastic but come on, nothing tops your Chocolate Mocha Pot de Creme - my absolute favorite dessert.

Nicolas Meyer said...

Instead of two smaller souffle, could I make one big souffle and still get the same effect?

Judy said...

Have not ventured into souffles yet, but this post could very well get me there.

Ray Butarbutar said...

Hmm this is really interesting, chef John. I'm so used to making a pastry cream and then folding in a very stiff peak meringue. Are there any advantages/disadvantages to making this roux-based technique of yours? Thanks

Chef John said...

not sure, never had any other way! :)

Carol said...

You made me overcome the fear of pumpkin pie with your recipe, I think I will conquer souffles with this recipe. Thank you Chef John <3

Chef John said...

let's hope! :)

Kurt said...

I made this last night.........didn't have any Grand Marnier so I used Contreau, it worked quite well. I made the Anglaise, and served it like suggested. Very yummy and pretty. Thanks again Chef John.

ChristineDux said...

I've made these before, but this recipe is inspiring in its straightforwardness. They came out great!

Just for the record, I made them in the morning and refrigerated until after dinner. They did not rise as much as in the video, but they were still awesome and delicious.

The creme anglaise is actually more of a pain to make. How long is it supposed to take? Mine took forever, about 20 minutes, and never quite made it to 180 deg. But it was still delicious. The temptation to turn up the heat was very strong, but I was afraid I would scorch it.

Chef John said...

Yes, you can make one large one. Same temp, but would take longer of course. Not sure exactly how much longer though without testing!

Chef John said...

You just needed to turn the heat up a bit! :)

Monica said...

Thanks for this FABULOUS recipe. i made it for Vday. I will work on it again. I found it hard to follow video as I made it. Now will have to clean iPad! When you recipe book is published put this in it. it was the ultimate creamy smooth yummy dessert. I made the meringue up after our main course. It did not rise as high, used 8 inch souffle dishes and next time will use smaller ones like you made so i get that height.

Locomotive_breath said...

Hi Chef John

I actually made this last night and the results were decidedly mixed. I followed your recipe faithfully. The only changes were that I used three 5 oz ramekins since I didn't have 8 oz ones. And I used all purpose "unbleached" flour. In your video although the dough is a lump when you transfer it to the mixing bowl, it turns into a thick liquid after you have added the liquor, vanilla extract and the egg yolks. This made it easier to incorporate the meringue. In my case, the mixture continued to remain a lump even after the addition of eggs and liquor. This meant that I had to use extra elbow grease to incorporate the first batch of meringue. The second batch was easier but the batter never really acquired the consistency like that in your video. It wasn't a homogeneous, albeit thick, pourable liquid like yours. The end result was that the souffle did rise but not like yours. It tasted great nevertheless.

BTW, the missus was exhausted and went off to sleep before I finished so I got a rain check for the llllllllooooots of compliments you promise in the video :). I have to do an encore now, so I really need to know what I should do to get a smooth batter. Should I wait for the dough to cool down before adding the eggs? Is unbleached flour the culprit?

Thank a ton.

Shantanu.

Locomotive_breath said...

Hi Chef John

I actually made this last night and the results were decidedly mixed. I followed your recipe faithfully. The only changes were that I used three 5 oz ramekins since I didn't have 8 oz ones. And I used all purpose "unbleached" flour. In your video although the dough is a lump when you transfer it to the mixing bowl, it turns into a thick liquid after you have added the liquor, vanilla extract and the egg yolks. This made it easier to incorporate the meringue. In my case, the mixture continued to remain a lump even after the addition of eggs and liquor. This meant that I had to use extra elbow grease to incorporate the first batch of meringue. The second batch was easier but the batter never really acquired the consistency like that in your video. It wasn't a homogeneous, albeit thick, pourable liquid like yours. The end result was that the souffle did rise but not like yours. It tasted great nevertheless.

BTW, the missus was exhausted and went off to sleep before I finished so I got a rain check for the llllllllooooots of compliments you promise in the video :). I have to do an encore now, so I really need to know what I should do to get a smooth batter. Should I wait for the dough to cool down before adding the eggs? Is unbleached flour the culprit?

Thank a ton.

Shantanu.

Chef John said...

The flour would not have been a factor. You must have had a stiffer dough than I, or it would have looked the same after adding the eggs and liquor. Might have just looked the same. Next time adjust your dough with more milk if it seems too stiff. Good luck!

Tom from Fogtown said...

These turned out great!! Thanks again for a fabulous recipe!!!!!

Mitchell Nguyen said...

Why does the recipe say like 1 tablespoon plus 2 tablespoons of butter/flour?

Mitchell Nguyen said...

Why does the recipe say like 1 tablespoon plus 2 tablespoons of butter/flour?

Chef John said...

It doesn't ;)

Says, 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons

Christi B. said...

Um...YUM! Made it for our Valentine's Dinner and it was absolutely amazing. Thanks for posting such wonderful recipes!

5ephyd said...

Chef John. Is there any substitute for the orange flavored liqueur that is alcohol free (children friendly?)? I can think of orange juice but i'm afraid of it curdling and effecting the outcome

Chef John said...

I've not looked, but I think they sell orange extract. Btw, almost all the alcohol cooks out, so I doubt this would be a problem for the kids. There's way more in those cough syrups!

Andria said...

Hi chef John,
A trick to make very straight top- just run your thumb around the edge of the ramekin where the batter is filled all the way to the top ( yes i am creedy like you! ). I promise your souffle will always be straight :)
Love your video!!
Andria

Locomotive_breath said...

Hi Chef John

Finally did the encore for the missus and it was a smashing success. The dough wasn't as stiff and I followed your instruction and added some milk before adding the egg whites. This kept it sufficiently runny and the end result was that ii had a souffle similar to yours. Also made the creme anglaise sauce and that too turned out great. It was almost set after I had refrigerated it for nearly 5 hours but a quick zap in the microwave followed by some half and half did the trick perfectly. Needless to say, the wife was very impressed and it seemed like a good way to celebrate women's day :-). The 2 year old too loved it. Thanks for the recipe and tips. This one is a keeper.

Cheers!

hollabackyoungin said...

Chef John:
First off, I love your show!!!
I attempted to make this last night. The Creme Anglaise was amazing! The only problem I had was I could not get the roux correct. I put 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons of (hot) melted butter and the same amount of flour into a pan on medium heat and it never formed into the dough, it simply stayed a liquid and eventually began to burn. I tried a second time and added more flour on my own and it did turn into a dough but the end product came out more like pound cake - which I'm sure is the result of my excess flour. So, how did I fudge up the roux??? Everyone else seems to have no problem with it. Should I have let the recently melted butter cool first? I was slightly embarassed in front of my date :( Good thing enough Creme Anglaise solves any problem!! :)

hollabackyoungin said...

Hellloooo Chef John!
First off, your shows have given me so much confidence in cooking! Thank you!

Secondly, I tried to make this yesterday but I couldn't get the roux right. I put 1tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons of mellted butter and flour in an already heated (med) pan, but the roux never came together like in your video, it stayed liquid. I waited for a while, continued stirring, it never came together and just started burning. I tossed it and tried again, adding more flour this time, but I think it was too much flour, because although it became dough-like it was too think, unlike yours in the video, and the final product was more like pound cake.
The creme anglaise was amazing!! How did I ruin the roux?! I put the melted butter in hot, would that mess it up?! Thank you for your help :) My girlfriend still loves me! yay

Chef John said...

Sorry, I really have no idea! Maybe watch the video again and see where u went wrong. I've gotten lots of success stories back from this one, so I know the recipe is OK. Good luck!!

whitterbug23 said...

Finally made this tonight and the overwhelming response from the family was if I would also be making these tomorrow night or would I make that chocolate cake again (aka. your chocolate sour cream bundt cake). Thank you so much for taking the time and effort to post these videos and recipes. So far all of the ones I have made have turned out wonderful, including this one. I wish I had let the sauce sit overnight as it just keeps getting better the longer it sits and mingles, but it was still darn good after a quick 30 minute rest.

Chef John said...

Great to hear! Thanks!

Helio Kwon said...

Hi Chef John,
My husband and I (who are huuuuge fans of yours) tried this soufflé in 4 hands and worked beautifully, as all other recipes we've already tried from foodwishes.com.
We absolutely love the videos and your sense of humour.

Best of all and thanks for the recipes!!!

sanny simon said...

first of all I like your blog. I made souffle today but my souffle unsuccessful. they cracked and fell flat after I took out from the oven.My questions is why it happens? how do I prevent it? Thank you chef john.

Chef John said...

They always fall when they come out! It's okay. Just eat right away.

Nicolas Connault said...

The first part, up until the folding of the meringue, looks a lot like a very wet choux pastry... I wonder if you could somehow combine the two... Soufflé-filled profiteroles!

Peter Sices said...

I tried this tonight and I am wondering if I goofed. It looks easy but you have a nice brown flat top on yours. Mine is domed and cracked on the top like a loaf of bread!

JamesInSeattle said...

Chef John,

Just made this as my first souffle! I noticed it did not rise as much as your and others videos show. I noticed your other souffle videos call for more milk, 1 cup vs 1/4 cup (this is a trend I see in many other souffle videos). Is the 1/4 cup here accurate, to my eye there is more than 1/4 milk in your video. Just a thought, I'll be trying your recipe with 1 cup milk soon to see if it makes a difference!

P.S. I've become a rockstar cook among my friends thanks to your videos, thank you so much!

Padmashree shrikant rao said...

Hi Chef,

I love your recipes. Can you tell me how to convert this to chocolate souffle.

Siriusly Kate said...

You 'are' great! Plate lingerie :) Will be giving this a try - thanks!

Cooper Li said...

Hey Chef John,
If I wanted to make a chocolate souffle out of the same measurements how much chocolate should I add?

Chef John said...

Not sure! I'd have to test!

Cooper Li said...

I found out! It's 40 grams of chocolate, I tested it out haha.

Matthew Paice said...

Hi Chef John. Big fan of your youtube videos. Thanks for all of your efforts.

I tried the Grand Marnier souffle, and although it rose beautifully, inside it had collapsed/was hollow. And the bottom sugar was a little burned. (We still ate it!) Any tips?

Hope you are well.
Best Regards,
Matthew (Dubai)

Chef John said...

That's how they are! :)

Scott D Cosenza said...

Dear Chef,

Thank you so very much for a great recipe and excellent presentation. I will be cooking many more of your dishes. You do a fantastic job!