Thursday, August 22, 2013

Peanut Dipping Sauce – To Serve or Not to Serve with Beef Satay

As promised, here’s the new and improved peanut dipping sauce recipe we just featured in the beef satay video. Of course, now I’m finding out that real beef satay is actually served with a sweet, spicy rice vinegar sauce, but that’s another video, and a rather easy one at that. Stay tuned.

There are no great mysteries here – mix it up, and then taste, taste, and taste. Peanut sauces are like snowflakes, and you really should twist the formula to suit your palette. You can add all kinds of fun stuff like lemongrass, ginger, Thai basil just to name a few. If peanut allergies are a concern, I’ve had this done with almonds, and it’s not bad at all.

One big tip if you make this ahead. It will harden up in the fridge, and you’ll need to get it back to room temp before serving. I usually just microwave for a couple seconds, and it will be back to its gorgeous, shiny, flowing self. I hope you give this delicious all-purpose dipping sauce a try soon. Enjoy!


Makes about 1 1/2 cup Peanut Dipping Sauce:
3/4 cup smooth all-natural, pure peanut butter
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp fish sauce
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tsp sesame oil
1/2 lime, juiced
sriracha or other hot chili sauce, to taste
1 small can (5.6 oz) coconut milk

View the complete recipe

12 comments:

Marijane said...

Oh boy, this looks so good! Your beef satay with this sauce is on my weekend menu for sure. I can't wait.

DannyWatt said...

I didn't get what you said about not using peanut butter brands?

So should I get organic peanut butter?

If I use Skippy peanut butter how much of the brown sugar must i cut back?

Chef John said...

Organic doesn't matter, just look at the label and it should just contain peanuts and maybe salt. Can't give you how much sugar to add. but simply add it to taste.

Purple Calico said...

There's another Asian variation of the satay sauce (what we call peanut sauce in Singapore/Malaysia/Indonesia) which is a lot more watery, spicier, and made with grounded peanuts so whenever you dip the meat in, you'll always get chunky bits of peanuts and the texture goes well with the meat in my opinion. Maybe you can try out this variation of the peanut sauce, Chef John. I always like seeing how people play around with the recipes.

I have tasted the peanut butter version of the sauce too and while it still has the nutty flavor, I found it a little too thick for my liking.

But we can all agree the sauce is addicting. =P

Terry Siri said...

Hi Chef John--I'm your #1 Thai-American fan, and I will attest that you serve chicken, pork, and beef satay with both peanut sauce, toast (to eat the leftover peanut sauce), AND the peppery-vinegary dip. Love your work and so grateful for your help for home cooks!

Georgia Dabinett said...

Beef marinating and trying to stop dipping into the peanut sauce before company arrives. Thanks for this!

James Netusil said...

I made this for dinner the other night along with the satay. I'm embarassed to say that I ate EVERYTHING I made. In one setting. It was THAT good.

derby said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
derby said...

What brand is the coconut that you use to make this?

Chef John said...

Don't remember, but any brand works!

Andria said...

Hi Chef John,
This sauce is delish! Goes perfectly with my rice paper wrapped spring rolls. Thanks a lot!!

Katherine Barron said...

Have to say this recipe looks a lot simpilar and quicker to make than my Thai style recipe. Mine includes red onion peanut oil garlic, tumeric, cumin, coriander. Sweet chilli sauce, peanut butter and coconut cream. May try this one and see how to compares