Friday, March 31, 2017

Thai-Dipped Beef Tri Tip – Satay, Unskewered

There are so many examples of big foods being re-imagined into smaller, bite-sized versions, but going the other direction is not nearly as common. That's what I was attempting to do with this satay-inspired, Thai-dipped beef tri tip.

I enjoy beef satay way more than I do skewering small pieces of beef. Besides, I’ve never made satay, and not stuck a bamboo skewer into my finger at some point in the process. And not only did this involve less labor, but you can cook this in any number of ways.

I decided to go low and slow, over indirect charcoal heat, until I reached an internal temperature of 132 F.  If you’re in more of a hurry, you can cook tri tip over higher heat, and it’s perfectly fine, as long as it doesn’t overcook. You can also roast this in the oven at 325 F., just in case a thunderstorm tries to mess up your plans.

All the ingredients here are easy to find, with the possible exception of lemongrass. Most big city grocery stores carry it, but in other parts of the country, I’ve seen it sold as a tubed puree, displayed in the produce department. If you can’t find it, you can add some lemon juice and zest to adjust. Either way, I really hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for one beef tri tip roast:
2 1/2 pound trimmed beef tri tip top roast
6 cloves garlic, crushed
1/3 cup chopped lemon grass (peel off woodiest parts, pound with back of knife, then chop)
3 tablespoons grated fresh ginger root
2 tablespoons grated raw onion
1/3 cup fish sauce
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar
2 tablespoons ground coriander
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/2  teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

- Grill, smoke, or roast to an internal temp of 130 to 135 F.

33 comments:

Abdul Alkurdi said...

Chef John, can you do a video on sourcing spices? Where/how to buy good spices from without spending a fortune. That would be highly appreciated.

Abdul Alkurdi said...

Chef John, can you do a video on sourcing spices? Where/how to buy good spices from without spending a fortune. That would be highly appreciated.

arwiv said...

I live in the backwoods of NW New Jersey. My hope is that some day before I die the local Shoprite will actually know what a tri-tip roast is. Go to an actual butcher you say? Well, before I die my other hope is that I have an actual butcher within a 25 mile radius of where I live.

Bill said...

"People are afraid of [fish sauce], because they don't understand what it is."
Explain that it's Worcestershire sauce without all the nasty herbs & spices.

Chris K. said...

Yeah yeah yeah. So you got a Big Green Egg. Showoff!

On the East Coast tri-tip can be difficult to source unless you have access to a decent butcher who knows his/her cuts. Depending on where you live it's often called "triangle steak" or "Newport steak" if it's even available at all.

If you can't find tri-tip, a bottom sirloin or bottom round roast is an adequate substitute.

The other day I was messing around with an Israeli couscous recipe calling for ground cumin and caraway seed. That seemed like a weird combination to me, since I associate caraway seeds almost exclusively with rye bread and German cuisine. But to my complete surprise the combination of toasted and freshly-ground caraway and cumin creates this amazing, complex, heady, citrus-y top note that deepens even more with the addition of coriander.

I've made a lot of satay skewers (or as you say, "skyurs")and suggest substituting palm sugar for the brown sugar, and peanut oil instead of vegetable oil in the marinade.

Charcoal is a must, unless you have wood-fired coals which are even better.

Edward said...

Hi, Chef John! I found your recipe on the blog for the peanut sauce. Any hope of getting a ricipe for the spicy cucumber salad you mention at the end of the video?

Scott Barber said...

Mmmmmm YUM!... decomposing fish liquid !!!

Sally said...

Chef - you got a Big Green Egg?!? You lucky boy! You deserve it, congrats!

John Palacios said...

Hi Chef John. I love watching your videos. How do you make the peanut sauce and cucumber salad. Thank you.

darcy said...

Hi, Chef John:
Could I use hanger, flank, or skirt steak equally well for this recipe?

gork WillS said...

Personally my favorite part of satay anything is the peanut sauce that usually accompanies it. I could eat shoe leather if it has the peanut sauce smeared all over. I hope (if you already haven't done it) that you can give us an awesome peanut sauce recipe as well.

D.M. Johnson said...

Hey Chef John! I didn't see a place on the blog to submit a food wish, so I'm doing it here in the blog comments.

My wife and I went to Virginia Beach for our anniversary this year and we had "She Crab Soup" for the first time. It was crab-tastic! (AKA: super good)

If it encourages you to make this food wish, you should know my wife is such a big fan that I bought her your cookbook. Yes, I am hoping that I can encourage you to make this food wish via bribery.

Thanks from Jersey!
-Dave

Rhonna said...

This sounds so fantastic I am going to try it right away. I just happen to have a fresh chunk of ginger in the fridge and a tri tip in the freezer. Thanks for the great recipes Chef.

Eric Stach said...

Love to see the Egg!! More Egg recipes, please!!

Bethany said...

Thank you!

Have you ever made sushi? I'd love to be able to make a basic California roll.

clanhannan said...

Looks great, can't wait to try it out! Hey, 2 things I would love to see you do. Jerk chicken and spaghetti pie. And a whole bunch of other stuff. But those. Also you are the absolute first cooking series I have enjoyed in a very long time, just love the at ease format.

David McCutcheon said...

Nice meranaide! Great flavors.

David McCutcheon said...

Nice meranaide! Great flavors.

Phil Lusardi said...

OK, when did you acquire a, "Big Green Egg?" I was so impressed by your "brick stack" grill set up, (#shesabrickgrill) I replicated it as a car camping rig. Wondering if there might be a big green egg review/tutorial coming up for those of us that are considering taking the leap.

Hope you had a good break, thanks for kicking off grilling season!

Ha Etz Chiam said...

"You are, of course, the Q-tip of your tri-tip."

SciPunk said...

I know you don't like giving exact cooking times, but can you give us a ballpark? An hour? Four hours?

FoodRaider said...

Chef John:

Do you think this would work well with an eye roast? I typically cook using the "high heat" method (500 degrees at 7 minutes per pound.)

Thanks!

=DAK= said...

This looks so awesome we'll be trying it this evening.. Do you happen to have a link to the pickled veggies you had in the video also?

Love your blog!

Annie Dykstra said...

This looks so good! Could you do recipe videos for the peanut sauce and the cucumber salad?! :D Thank you!

Philippe Goudreault said...

Chef! Do you also have the recipe for the spicy cucumber salad and peanut sauce?

fluffy said...

This seems like yet another perfect recipe to try sous vide. :)

Jason Smith said...

This was KILLER!

Jason Smith said...

Unfortunately, on the Right Coast. Skirt steak was used

Don Gringo said...

Another winner CJ! I think its a good idea to scrape off the marinade chunks before cooking/eating as I left it on and didnt really enjoy the intense lemongrass punch when bitten into. Will definitely be making this again though!

Carla Anderson said...

I would not go so far as to say tri-tip is bulletproof, but I've never had a tough piece. as long as you're cutting across the grain, you could have an overcooked-but-still-tender piece of meat.

I love to make a Korean BBQ-style marinade with sake, honey, gochujang, garlic and ginger (am I forgetting anything? probably. and I know someone, somewhere is asking "Where's the Asian pear?" Well, I've never tried it but I plan to.) for my tri-tip, but i'll be making this on Monday because my husband and I were both drooling over this recipe, and we're both HUGE tri-tip fans.

My question is, is it safe to marinate my tri-tip in this all day tomorrow? Because that's what's happening… :D

koshdevours said...

Are you going to post the ingredients/recipe for the side garnish?

Tom Lowry said...

This recipe is a delicious alternative to the usual western BBQ rub tri-tip recipes. I am a big fan of tri-tip for larger dinner parties though it can be challenging to get it cooked to desired temp on the grill. A few years ago I found the solution. I bought a sous vide cooker. It works great for tri-tip. I cook sous vide at 130 F approximately 3 hours. I then sear on a very hot charcoal grill on all sides for 2-3 minutes a side. I check with an instant read thermometer and pull at an internal temp of 135 F.

Blake S. said...

FYI, this makes fantastic smoked chicken wings too :-)