Friday, September 21, 2018

Turkish Stuffed Eggplant (Karniyarik) – Splitting Bellies

“Karniyarik” means “split belly,” which refers to the technique used to stuff them, although depending on the size of your eggplant, it could also refer to you after enjoying this delicious dish. By the way, this was my first time making these, and when I mentioned in the video only doing 15 minutes of research before filming, I wasn’t joking. So, you’ve been warned.

Having said that, I thought these came out really well, and I would only tweak a couple minor things next time. I’d sprinkle the insides with salt before stuffing, since there wasn’t enough in my filling to season them to my taste. I’d also toss in some chopped parsley, which would have added a little freshness to the dish, although the dried rosemary did work nicely.

Lastly, I’d take the advice I got on Twitter, and serve them with a yogurt sauce, like our famous tzatziki. That would be an amazing condiment for these, since the cold, acidic sauce would be a perfect foil for the rich, aromatic, slightly sweet flavor profile. 

Since I’m fully admitting not knowing what I’m doing, I welcome any and all tips and tricks, but most of all, I really do hope you give these a try. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4 Turkish Stuffed Eggplant (Karniyarik:
4 medium sized eggplant
olive oil as needed
1 yellow onion, diced
1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
1/4 cup freshly chopped Italian parsley (I didn’t add, but you should)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 pound ground lamb or beef
1 1/2 cups diced sweet and/or hot peppers
1 ounce (about 1 cup unpacked) finely, freshly grated Pecorino cheese, or whatever you’re into
1 cup chicken broth

- Roast eggplant at 400 F. until just barely soft, stuff, and continue baking until very tender.
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12 comments:

Edblah said...

Your ingredients list seems to be missing the peppers. Good thing the video is entertaining AND instructive!

Unknown said...

I make these but add loads of mint instead of parsley.Mint and lamb are just perfect!

Unknown said...

I make these with mint instead of parsley.mint and lamb are just perfect!

Mariam

beemo said...

Here's a food wish. A little explanation:

I made your 'Arroz con pollo' twice over the past few days, extremely tasty. Then late last night I shredded some cheddar cheese over some corn chips for a snack, and remembered the capers aspect of the arroz con pollo, so I added some capers to the shredded cheese before melting it.

The result was not good -- capers and something didn't go together.

So, my food wish: How about an episode where you give your opinions of things that DO and DON'T go together? It might turn into something interesting.

Vancouverite said...

Hi Chef John!
This comment doesn't have anything to do with this recipe, but I wanted to let you know that I made your meatless meatballs back in February and they were very good (still prefer meat though), but here is the big thing, this summer I had my Uncle over for dinner and I made your meatless meatballs into some burgers for him as he is a vegetarian (has been as long as I can remember) and he was floored! He absolutely loved them! And was eager to take the left over patties home with him! I made sure to send him a link to your page too ;)
I personally want to thank you for sharing the recipe, my Uncle was so touched that I had taken the time to made these burgers from scratch just for him and without your recipe I would have just bought veggie burgers for him. So thank you!

Charlotte
(from Vancouver, Canada)

PS. My BF LOVES your sausage rolls, but personally I can't choose a favourite of your recipes... so many are too good!

Merri said...

Hey Chef John, they look mouthwatering delicious! My mum makes something very similar but she adds rice into the meat mixture. We eat them with Greek yoghurt or tsatsiki. Thanks for all your great videos! Cheers!

ms_lili said...

Looks absolutely delicious. Just watched your video on yummyhood.

Amon Adamantos said...

Dear Chef John
Would you ever consider cooking the legendary recipe for stuffed pig's trotter by Pierre Koffmann / Marco Pierre White? Marco Pierre White said that it's his favorite dish that he'd love to have as his last meal. I think that's a big statement for somebody with his culinary background.
Kind regards
A long time fan of yours

shweetpotato said...

Chef John HELP ME lol, I have used a recipe that you have for YEARS, it was pork carnitas, you boiled the pork with spices, I think cumin, bay and also some tomato paste if I'm thinking right.. the video is GONE.. my life is over, I have no clue how I'll go on now lol.. HELP if you can.. here is my blog..it has a link to the video..THAT IS NO LONGER THERE ACKKkkkk https://chubbagurl.blogspot.com/2009/08/pork-carnitas.html I'm so upset..Carmen

HOW DO I CONTACT YOU?? Do you have access to that recipe? Do you recall it at all?

Yasin TÜFEKÇİ said...

very good

Brian Whitmore said...

http://misanthropia.com/images/Plant.jpg

TKJ said...

Dear Chef John

Thank you for sharing your Karnıyarık recipe on your site. I cook the eggplants in the oven as well after drizzling it with olive oil which makes this food lighter. I would like to share my thoughts about this beautiful dish. Traditionally it is made like this:
1.Peel the eggplants in stripes
2. keep the eggplants in the salted water (which helps to get rid of the bitterness) while preparing the stuffing mixture
3. dry them with a towel
4. fry them in a big pan with a plenty of frying oil
5. place them on a tray
6. split the bellies of eggplants vertically and with a help of a fork gently press down the flesh of eggplant to make a room for the stuffing
7.sprinkle some salt to insides
8. finally fill them with the stuffing
9. pour the mixture of the sauce which is made with a spoonful of tomatoe and Pepper (sweet or hot) paste diluted with a bit off oil and water as well as a bit of salt. And cook the whole thing in the oven for 15-20 min.
I never add cinnemon in the mixture(i don't think cinnemon is in the recipe of Turkish version, obviously it is also upto your personal taste to add it) and yes chopped parsley should be added. I like to add a little bit of chopped dill and Half a spoon of tomatoe / pepper paste as well. The seasoning involves cumin powder, black pepper, red pepper flakes, salt. The more the better doesn't work always because you want to taste the meat with its natural flavor. I also find it much tastier to use lamb meat chopped with knife into very very small pieces (you can also use half beef half lamb or only beef if you are not into lamb meat).

We like to serve it with rice and Cacik which is made with thick full fat yogurt chopped cucumber , dill, minced garlic clove , salt and dry flakes of peppermint or fresh chopped peppermint. It is a complete meal and extremely delicious which was also the most talented Luciano Pavarotti's favourite dish when he had the opportunity :)