Saturday, January 5, 2019

Crispy Yuca Fries – More Uber Than Tuber?

These crispy yuca fries are often presented as a healthier alternative to fried potatoes, but the taste and texture is so good, I think it would be more appropriate to describe French fries as a less-healthy alternative to these. They really are that good, and do a great job of bridging the gap between regular fried potatoes, and sweet potato fries.

Once fried, the texture is remarkably similar to a russet or Kennebec potato (the variety most commonly used for fries and chips), and while these do have a slightly sweeter taste, it’s not nearly as pronounced as a sweet potato. Like I mentioned in the video, I always regret ordering sweet potato fries, since, to my palate at least, they’re just not savory enough, which is not the case with these.

Just be sure to boil them first, since they can be toxic eaten raw in larger amounts. Why you’d ever want to eat a big pile of raw yuca is beyond me, but the legal department wanted to mention that regardless. Anyway, once safely cooked, they can be pan-fried crispy as seen here, or deep fried, or place them on a foiled sheet pan, brush them with oil, and bake at 425 F., turning occasionally until they’re browned and crusty.  

I was going to finish by listing off other ways you can use this delicious root, but to save time I’ll just say that if a recipe works with regular potato, it will work with yuca. And maybe even work better, which is why I really do hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients:
- Yuca root (aka cassava), peeled, cut, and boiled until just tender in salted water
* Please note: on larger roots there may be a tough fibrous part running through the middle, which can be trimmed out after boiling. These didn't really have one, but you'll know if yours do. 
- olive oil, or other appropriate fat for frying
-->

22 comments:

Omar said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Omar said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
INUNG said...

Fav Indonesian snack, fry it for about 3mnt in hot oil, soaked it in water, preferably cold water seasoned with crushed garlic and salt, wait for 30' to one hour, or until you see it cracked and fluffy, fry it again until golden crispy, enjoy! Don't get to fluffy or it will crumble when you fry it

Inky said...

I'm pleasantly surprised to see you making this! I grew up eating yucca as my mother liked to make it to eat with breakfasts on the weekends with chicharones (fried pork skins) or would add them to soups and stews. Any leftover yucca from breakfast would be deep fried and served along the main dish at lunch or dinner. Boiled yucca with butter and sour cream, sometimes mashed with a bit of lime or lemon juice too, I love it! Yucca fries are a favorite as well, but using them for home fries? I can't believe I hadn't thought of that, so thanks for the idea! I will definitely try that soon! Thanks Chef John!

João Bordignon said...

Yuca or Cassava is very delicious, but be warned that is one of the more inconsistent vegetables. On the same plant you can have a very tender and easy to cook root, while the one right next to it will hard as rubber after hours of boiling. The way Chef John did, using a single root is the best way to get consistent results.

If you brought pre-cut and peeled cassava do the knife test with each piece often. Because some of it will cook in 10 minutes and others may need 30 minutes. If after 45 minutes it is still hard that piece is way too rich in starch. In this case, you have two options, trow it away, or cut it in small pieces, fry an onion, some garlic, meat (I suggest beef ribs, each bone cut in 1 1/2 parts), and the cassava, add lots of water and spices. Boil it until tender, it will became the thickest and tastiest soup you ever eaten. If you made it right, after it cooled down a little you could eat the soup with a fork!

Serious, I'm Brazilian, cassava is a staple food here, but the cooking time is random as heck. I tried planting my own, trying to make then all easy to cook. Tilling make no difference, fertilizing only made the roots bigger, mixing sand in the soil helped a little, but made it susceptible to diseases, watering made some pants harder and others soft. Even cloning the easier to cook plants make no difference in the results!

TL,DR: Get your knife and poke it often.

João Bordignon said...

Yuca or Cassava is very delicious, but be warned that is one of the more inconsistent vegetables. On the same plant you can have a very tender and easy to cook root, while the one right next to it will hard as rubber after hours of boiling. The way Chef John did, using a single root is the best way to get consistent results.

If you buy pre-cut and peeled cassava do the knife test with each piece often. Because some of it will cook in 10 minutes and others may need 30 minutes. If after 45 minutes it is still hard that piece is way too rich in starch. In this case, you have two options, trow it away, or cut it in small pieces, fry an onion, some garlic, meat (I suggest beef ribs, each bone cut in 1 1/2 parts), and the cassava, add lots of water and spices. Boil it until tender, it will became the thickest and tastiest soup you ever eaten. If you made it right, after it cooled down a little you could eat the soup with a fork!

Serious, I'm Brazilian, cassava is a staple food here, but the cooking time is random as heck. I tried planting my own, trying to make then all easy to cook. Tilling make no difference, fertilizing only made the roots bigger, mixing sand in the soil helped a little, but made it susceptible to diseases, watering made some pants harder and others soft. Even cloning the easier to cook plants make no difference in the results!

TL,DR: Get your knife and poke it often.

Xty said...

OMG I love fried cassava ! I remember eating it when I was a kid :P

Alberto said...

do anyone read this anyways?

what we do in PR with those is... after they are fried... we do like a... sauce of sorts....

in escabeche
which is nothing more than a hot seasoned olive oil with peppers, onions and olives

olive oil, laced with a bit of pepper, and salt
a green cubanela pepper
and a medium onion, both wilted down in the olive oil
and a capful of vinager to give it a zing at the end.

me me said...

I've never eaten this, but I am going to try doing them in the Air Fryer.

Patrick Callaghan said...

Chef John, please post a pasta arrabiata recipe!!!

Unknown said...

I LOVE yuca! I just tasted it for the first time about a year ago and never looked back. Thank you so much for showing me how to prepare them. Could you do a yuca croquet video or do you just mash them like potatoes and make them from that?
Again, thank you for this wonderful video!

Clayton Lee said...

Made them today and didn't die. Chef John, what would you think of slicing on a mandolin into thin rounds and doing yuca chips? Think that'll work?

Jonet said...

In My Home Country (Indonesia)it is a delicacy to cook cassava with salt-garlic seasoning. But we cooked it different way, first we boiled/steam them until tender, then salt and crush garlic we re added to Iced water to soaked them until they are fully developed and crack at the end of the cut, then they go bathing on deep fryer, untuk golden brown. This methode is to gain crisp out site the cassava but tender and creamy on the inside.

Unknown said...

Goodmorning John,


I understand you put your recipes on the blog to make money but could you please put the metric measurements too for your international fans?
You would make more money that way too…

Thank you

Kind regards from a big fan from the Netherlands

Vishal Chawhan said...

can you please put in the details on how to make the dipping sauces :)

Vishal Chawhan said...

can you please add the details and recipes to make the dipping sauces =)

Ross Temple said...

Hi Chef John absolutely love your very well instructional videos and humor. I’ve got a request, I’ve tried thickening with eggs and something I’m doing goes wrong. If you could do a Egg drop soup and show how egg thickening works it would be greatly appreciated. Your avid fan, Ross

regis eco said...

There's nothing more Brazilian than that. They are terrific with pork cracklings, sausage (linguiça) or fried ribs.

Unknown said...

This is such a common dish in Brazil! It is a good one to accompany pork or just something to snack on with beer. So happy to see it here!

CJK said...

Thanks Chef John. I would never have thought of buying Yuca, Chef John made me do it! Almost a French fry, not quite, but delicious in its own way. I also made homefries and next is mashed potato, I mean Yuca, or is it Casava?

Jota said...

Make a simple “ají” (hot sauce) with finely chopped spring onions, the fresh hot pepper of your choice in your preferred amount, finely chopped cilantro, salt, water. You can add a finely diced tomato if you are so inclined. Another amazing way to have yuca is to boil it until very tender and serve it as a side with, say, a braised chicken and “hogao” sauce (an example recipe at https://www.mycolombianrecipes.com/colombian-tomato-and-onion-sauce-hogao).

D@n!kA said...

Currently got mine boiling in the water :) I loved these the one time I tried it but I never made it before on me own. Boy oh boy you were right about it being on the harder side with regards to cutting. You're right about me just knowing about the tough fibrous part down the middle cause mine has one of those.
Im already starting on my Sambal Olek Aioli I cant wait to get these a baking in the oven!
Thank you! :)