Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Folded Pork Cutlets – Layers of Flavor, Literally

I thought I’d seen all there was to see when it came to pan-fried pork cutlets, but then I saw something called Katsu “Mille-Feuille,” and I realized I hadn’t seen anything yet. Okay, I’m being a little dramatic, but I really loved the unusual look and feel, as well as the internal flavoring opportunities the multi-layer technique provides.

Besides figuring out what to flavor yours with, the other main challenge is deciding how long to cook them. The 4 to 5 minute time I gave is just a guess, since it depends on the thickness of, and fillings in, your cutlet. Although the folding and cheese inside will help keep things moist, pork tenderloin can dry out, so I don’t recommend going past 145 F. internal temp.

However, the problem with testing by poking it with a thermometer is that you’ll have hot juices spurting out, which would be a shame. This is why I like to go with the poke test, and when it springs back enthusiastically, it’s usually done. Also, a few minutes of resting time will help even out the heat, and moisture, but by the time you add your sides, and get to the table, you should be fine.

As I mentioned in the video, this method screams for personalization, and I look forward to seeing what you come up with. Whatever that may be, I really do hope you give it a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 2 Portions:
1 trimmed pork tenderloin, split in half lengthwise
salt, freshly ground black pepper, and cayenne to taste
4 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 ounces grated cheese, or as needed
2 tablespoons freshly chopped Italian parsley
For the breading:
enough all-purpose flour to coat
beaten egg
panko, or regular plain breadcrumbs
olive oil for frying (at least 1/4 inch of oil in the pan is recommended)
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25 comments:

Ostrich Ink said...

Thank you, Chef John! Just wondering, can we use pork loin instead of tenderloin?

Matt said...

Stunning.

Could you keep these in the fridge (or freezer) at some stage before frying? I'm thinking they should do well before breading... maybe after? Maybe after, but frozen rather than just fridged? I guess you could roll up one of the pounded-flat tenderloin halves in its plastic wrap and fill it with something else the next day....

Gripper99 said...

Hello
Just a general comment here. Thank you so much for the blog. We literally make one of your recipes 3-4 times per month. I made your Carmel chicken for the umtenth time just last night. Other popular favorites chez nous are your chicken tikka, your basic tomato/marinara sauce and your pork braised in milk to name just a very very few. Not only have you taught me some great techniques—your oven method for tightly wrapped and foiled “confit” of pork for instance—but your kitchen tips have significantly improved my cooking skills. Once again with this recipe you give the superb tip about seasoning the meat instead of the flour—sounds so simple and obvious—but I’ve always seasoned the flour. Which clearly is a mistake given that you want the flavor in the meat and not in the flour. Now why couldn’t I think of that? Anyway I’m not a crazy drag-on blogger despite appearance to the contrary. Just felt I owed a thanks. Thank you Chef John! Don’t be stubborn in the kitchen” (I use this one in the office as well!)
Steve K.

TA Anderson said...

Think that I will make this weekend with a layer of prosciutto and provolone cheese! Thanks Chef John

Joe Fitzpatrick said...

I made these for dinner yesterday. I was a little unsure if they were cooked properly so I gave them a few minutes in the oven after frying. They were absolutely delicious. I follow a lot of food blogs but this is the one where I consistently find new and novel techniques. I'm am really interested in ideas for different fillings for these.

RyanJNielson said...

Made this for the family last night, Jon - huge hit! Served with Japanese Ginger Salad and Sushi Rice with some homemade Tankatsu sauce. Thanks for the recipe!

RyanJNielson said...

Made this for the family last night, Jon - huge hit! Served with some Japanese Ginger Salad and Sushi Rice with homemade Tankatsu sauce! Thanks for the recipe!

Robert Voice said...

What a brilliant layering technique Chef. We've made cutlets before which were always dry, requiring a Heimlich maneuver. I took your advice to think outside the box and made an apple butter filling (yes, your recipe from a few months ago) along with a sprinkling of Gruyere and sage . So delicious for lunch during this current SF storm. It's like having Octoberfest all over again. Now where did I store my lederhosen?

marcobday said...

DELICIOUS! I know you said not to go crazy with the filling, and to accent, rather than overpower the meat. But I couldn't help myself. I used gruyere, mustard, and thinly sliced cornishon and it tasted like a Cubano sandwich. Next I might try Russian dressing and kraut and bread it in crumbs from a toasted slice of rye for a Reuben Sandwich. I'm going to be palying with this one for a while.

Chris K. said...

Usually when I beat my meat, I like to use some lubrication, such as a light coating of cooking spray. But in this application I can see how that could prevent the fried panko crust from adhering to the meat.

I am going to try this technique as Cuban sandwich katsu: mustard, roast pork, pickles, Swiss cheese,and salami (I'm an Ybor City fan).

Jessica said...

This looks delicious! If I’m trying to avoid eating foods fried in oil, would you recommend that I bake this instead? Would that work or would the pork get dried out? Thanks!

Giby said...

Wow. That was delicious. Going to use sage next time because I am well trained. Thank you!

Lollipop said...

Hi Chef John I love your all your videos I’ve made several
of your recipes with great results. I’ve always loved cooking
and even more so now that I found your Foodwishes.com
website if ever I need a recipe I look to your site first.
I’d love to make your folded pork cutlet recipe.
I see the ingredients online but the only instructions
I’ve found is on the video has the full recipe not been released
yet?
Thank you
Lara

Z-Man said...

Can’t wait to try this today. Will try finely diced cherry peppers instead of the cheese.

dar said...

send me a sample ill let you know if its good

Unknown said...

Caper cream sauce... with a little Dijon,fresh lemon and creme fraiche!

Thomas Macfarlane said...

I have some light goat cheese with yuzu, some sliced cooked apple and some shallot confit, and I'm going with it.

Daniel Webb said...

This didn't turn out super flavorful. I think the meat wasn't thin enough but then again that should deter from the flavor as much as I felt it did

K.D. Meiss said...

This looks delicious but do you think you could do this recipe with radish or cabbage kimchi as filling? Or would that be too much moisture?

Tyler Doe said...

Made this last night. Pretty darn good!

Hank Hollenbaugh said...

Another great technique Chef John! I baked it on a wire rack over a sheet pan and I came out great. Also someone asked about doing ahead. I prepared the meat in the morning except the breading, wrapped the cutlets tightly in plastic and it worked great. Served with glazed carrots and a green salad.

Greg Miranda said...

Thanks for that amazing technique Chef John - I made this last night for my family and it was absolutely fantastic! My first one I didn't pound out as thoroughly as I should have (yet it was still amazing), but by the third one my cutlets were looking just like yours.

I googled a simple katsu sauce that took literally 2 minutes to make, and we could not have enjoyed the meal more. You would have been proud to see a table full of teenage girls all doing #forkdontlie...

Artefaktum Artefaktum said...

This dish is very similar to "Cordon bleu", an originally Swiss dish. Instead of mustard you take ham. This "Schnitzel"-Combination is of course very popular in Germany. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordon_bleu_(dish)

Andy Smith said...

Wow! What a mouth watering delicacy! I am a big foodie and i love to prepare and try different food. you can add one more delicious recipe to your list that i tried Yesteday "Saag gosht"

Have Apron....Will Bake said...

Made this last night for dinner(actually assembled it up to the coating process the night before and left it in the fridge). This was so incredibly moist and flavorful and delicious!! And that was even after my nervousness (of it being undercooked) and putting in the oven for a bit.
Can't wait to try different flavor combinations when I make this again and again. Thanks!!