Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Baked Potato Puffs – A New Way to Pomme Dauphine from a Potato Fiend

The hardest line cook job I ever had was working the broiler station at the Carnelian Room, where on a busy night I’d prepare over 250 steaks and chops, which wasn’t even the most difficult part. No, the biggest challenge was actually frying these potato puffs to order, to go on all those plates.

It was a lot of work, but a labor of love, since pomme dauphine, as my French friends would call this, is one of the greatest foods ever invented, especially for potato fanatics like me. However, as with most fried foods, they can be messy to make, and unless you have an industrial-strength hood fan, your kitchen will smell like a deep fryer for days, which is why I wanted to try and do a baked version.

I was very happy with the results, and while the outside wasn’t dark and crispy like the fried version, the inside was virtually identical, and thoroughly enjoyable in their own right. Whether you’re making them as a warm snack with a dip, or to go alongside some eggs, or a grilled steak, the baked version should work out just fine.

Of course, since we’re getting close to Thanksgiving, if you are one of these people who deep-fries the turkey, I would probably go with the traditional method. Especially since you’ll be cooking outside where sneaking a few of these while you’re working will be pretty easy to get away with. Either way, I really do hope you give these potato puffs a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 12 Small Baked Potato Puffs:
(I did a tiny test batch, so I highly recommend doubling or tripling the recipe)
1 cup cooked, plain mashed potatoes (Yukon or Russet)
salt and cayenne to taste
small pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
butter for the muffin tin
For the pastry dough:
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup flour
pinch of salt
1 large egg

- For a mini muffin tin*, butter well, and bake at 450 F for about 20 minutes, or until browned and puffed.

- Or, deep-fry at 375 F for a few minutes until browned and puffed.

* These might work in a regular muffin tin, but you’ll need to bake longer.

Friday, October 12, 2018

Chicken Apple Sausage Patties – Doesn’t Feel Like Chicken

Imagine a sausage patty made from chicken that’s just as tender, juicy, and flavorful as one made from pork. What? A not-dry, not-rubbery feeling chicken-based sausage? Sounds impossible, and it is, unless you sneak in a little bit of pancetta, and follow a few simple techniques.

Instead of buying ground chicken at the market, which is always too finely ground, we’re going to use thighs, and grind our own. This makes for a significantly more succulent and tender patty, as long as you keep the meat very cold while working with it. I like to pulse it on and off in the food processer, but your can also use your grinder attachment, or go low-tech, and just chop it finely with a big knife or cleaver.

As I mentioned in the video, if you’re not into patties, you can make links, or simply crumble the raw mixture into a hot pan, and break it up as it cooks. Once browned, you can add your butter and flour, and continue with the pan sauce. Besides saving you a little time, this method probably makes for the most flavorful gravy.

By the way, most chicken apple sausage recipes call for some kind of sugar to be added, but I really don’t think it’s necessary, thanks to the natural sugar in the apples. As with all ground meat recipes, you can always fry up a small piece of your mixture, and test for yourself, but for me, the little touch of maple syrup in the sauce is all the extra sweetness this needs. Either way, I really do hope you give these chicken apple sausage patties a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 8 Chicken Apple Sausage Patties (about 4 ounces each):
For the sausage:
1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
4 ounces pancetta or bacon
2 teaspoons kosher salt, or to taste
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon crushed fennel seeds (toast in dry pan until fragrant)
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
2 teaspoons finely minced fresh sage
2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, grated, and squeezed dry

For the Pan Gravy (enough for 8 Patties)
6 tablespoons butter
8 sage leaves, optional (remove when crisp)
6 tablespoons flour
2 1/2 cups chicken broth, plus more if needed
1 tablespoon maple syrup, or to taste
1/3 cup crème fraiche or heavy cream
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

- Click here for the Buttermilk Biscuits recipe.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Face Pie – The Halloween Pastry You Can’t Un-See

A few months ago I saw a pie image on Twitter so creepy, and disturbing, that I actually questioned whether it was too terrifying to post as a video. Usually, Halloween-themed recipes have the opposite problem, as they are almost never actually scary, but that’s not an issue here. By the way, can someone get sued for giving people nightmares?

Anyway, I eventually traced the image back to what I assumed would be some sort of food blog, but it was actually someone’s Etsy shop, where they were selling inedible versions of this basic design. So, I wasn’t able to see how it was made, but did use their “face” as a rough guide, and despite being somewhat anatomically challenged, I thought this came out looking great. And by great, I mean terrible.

If you’re disturbed enough to make this, you can use our tourtière recipe for the crust and filling, which is exactly what I did here, except for whatever reason I added a touch of ketchup to the meat. Of course, this technique would work for topping any pie, including all your favorite fruit versions, and the next time cherries are in season, I may just have to give this one more try. Or not. We’ll see. In the meantime, if at all possible, please enjoy!


- Follow this tourtière video link for the crust and filling recipes.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Black Lentil Stew with Sausage & Kale – Dark Food for Dark Days

There’s nothing like a big, steaming bowl of comfort food to make everything seem all right, and this dark, but delightful black lentil stew with sausage and kale is no exception. Whether you’re battling a lack of sunlight, or troubles at work, or you’re a NY Giants fan, a dish like this can do wonders to brighten your mood. 

Sausage and lentils is a marriage made in heaven, and so good together, that not even kale can ruin it. I’m kidding, and actually love kale, but if you’re not the biggest fan in the world, maybe try it one more time in this. As long as you cook the greens until they get nice and tender, you’ll be surprised how sweet, and mild they become.

In case that’s asking too much, spinach, and/or other vegetables will also work here, as these types of recipes are a perfect catch-all for seasonal produce. You people with neighbors who grow zucchini should pay especially close attention to that last part. Regardless of what you add, or don’t, I really do hope you give this black lentil stew a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4 large portions:
2 tablespoons butter
1 yellow onion, large dice
1 large carrot, cubed
1 rib celery, cubed
12 ounces smoked garlic sausage, or any kind of sausage (cook fresh sausage first, and then slice)
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 cups black lentils
6 cups chicken broth
freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
2 bunches (about 12 ounces by weight) kale or other leafy dark greens, chopped, washed
1 large diced tomato, optional
sour cream and cayenne to garnish

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Honeycomb Toffee – Do the Hokey Pokey

This very easy to make candy goes by many names; cinder toffee, sponge candy, and my personal favorite, “hokey pokey,” but no matter what you call it, this eye-catching confection is a proven crowd-pleaser. And, that’s before you dip in in chocolate, as my British friends highly recommend.

It’s no big secret that people love sweet, crispy things, but this also features the most interesting melt-in-your-mouth texture, which is created by thousands of bubbles, trapped in the cooling sugar syrup. As you can see in the video, I did two batches with different amounts of baking soda, and while the second batch did look better, the first batch was crunchier, and didn’t have any kind of aftertaste.

Other than suffering a horrible burn, there’s not a lot that can go wrong with this recipe, as long as you heat the syrup to 300 F. I checked mine with a probe thermometer, although a candy thermometer that attaches to the side of the pan would be a lot easier. Some folks say you can simply go by appearance, and when the syrup goes from clear to slightly golden, it’s done, but that requires a certain amount of experience.

Another method to gauge the temperature is by dropping a little bit of the molten syrup in water to see if it instantly turns into rock candy. That will work, but since thermometers aren’t expensive, and every kitchen should have one, that really is the way to go. Regardless, as long as you promise to be careful, I really do hope you give this gorgeous, homemade honeycomb toffee a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 8 portions:
1/2 cup white granulated sugar
2 tablespoons corn syrup (or golden syrup)
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon baking soda (do not use baking powder)
2 tablespoons water
- Heat to 300 F. before adding baking soda

Friday, September 28, 2018

Detroit-Style Pizza – This "Rock City" Pizza Rocks

The next time you hear people arguing about whether Chicago or New York has the best pizza, politely interrupt them, and make sure they know about Detroit-style, since it really should be part of the discussion. And by discussion, I mean heated argument.

Even though Detroit-style pizza is often referred to as “deep dish,” I don’t think that accurately captures the essence of this crispy, crusty, crazy-good slice. It has flavor elements of a slightly charred, blistered, thin-crust pizza, with the texture of light, airy focaccia. Plus, if you use the properly shaped pan, the edges of your crust get wonderfully crunchy, making for a very unique experience.

If you can’t get the classic 14” X 10” Detroit pizza pan, you can also use a 12” cast iron skillet, although you may need to not use quite as much dough, since I forget how much surface area that has, but it should be close. You can also use two 8” X 8” metal cake pans, but no matter what you go with, be sure it’s at least a few inches deep, otherwise things could get ugly.

Since I’m new to this style of pizza, if you’re from Detroit, please let me know how close I got, and if there’s anything obvious I’m missing. I know I needed more, and thicker, pepperoni, but other than that, I was really happy with how this came out, and hope everyone gives it a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for one 14x10 Detroit-Style Pizza:
For the dough:
1 cup warm water
1 package dry active yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
1 teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt
2 1/2 cups bread flour

For the sauce (you’ll have a little extra):
one (24-oz) jar marinara sauce
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon red chili flakes
1 teaspoon garlic powder

The rest:
8 ounces sliced pepperoni
12 ounces brick cheese (I used 8 oz. of Monterey Jack and 4 oz. of cheddar)

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Avocado Ricotta Crostini – Start Spreading the News

Michele and I were in Oakland recently, at a restaurant called Southie, when I saw something I’d never seen before; avocado and ricotta cheese paired together on a crostini. I didn’t order it, but was fascinated by the idea, and eventually it turned into what you see here.

By the way, everything we did have was great, so if you’re in the area, check them out. I don’t do a lot of shout-outs here, but that'll make me feel a little better about stealing their appetizer. They actually did theirs with the cheese spread on first, and then sliced avocado placed over the top, but I decided to go for something a little easier to serve, and went with a spread instead.

I found this to be a very delicious combination that was sort of unusual, and yet familiar at the same time. I did roughly equal parts cheese and avocado, but of course you can play around with this ratio, depending on your mood. The same goes for the garnishes, where any number of fresh, or pickled seasonal vegetables would work wonderfully, as would a scattering of crispy bacon.

As you know, we’re heading straight into the heart of entertaining season, and no matter what you decorate yours with, these beauties would make for a great appetizer or snack, which is just one reason I really do hope you give these avocado ricotta crostini a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for about 6 appetizer-sized portions:
1 large ripe Hass avocado
3/4 cup ricotta cheese (or more or less depending on the ratio you want)
1/2 lemon, juiced (you could also add some of the zest)
1 tablespoon finely sliced fresh basil
salt and cayenne to taste
sliced cherry tomatoes and radishes to garnish
drizzle of olive oil
pinch of sea salt and freshly snipped chives for the top

Friday, September 21, 2018

Turkish Stuffed Eggplant (Karniyarik) – Splitting Bellies

“Karniyarik” means “split belly,” which refers to the technique used to stuff them, although depending on the size of your eggplant, it could also refer to you after enjoying this delicious dish. By the way, this was my first time making these, and when I mentioned in the video only doing 15 minutes of research before filming, I wasn’t joking. So, you’ve been warned.

Having said that, I thought these came out really well, and I would only tweak a couple minor things next time. I’d sprinkle the insides with salt before stuffing, since there wasn’t enough in my filling to season them to my taste. I’d also toss in some chopped parsley, which would have added a little freshness to the dish, although the dried rosemary did work nicely.

Lastly, I’d take the advice I got on Twitter, and serve them with a yogurt sauce, like our famous tzatziki. That would be an amazing condiment for these, since the cold, acidic sauce would be a perfect foil for the rich, aromatic, slightly sweet flavor profile. 

Since I’m fully admitting not knowing what I’m doing, I welcome any and all tips and tricks, but most of all, I really do hope you give these a try. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4 Turkish Stuffed Eggplant (Karniyarik:
4 medium sized eggplant
olive oil as needed
1 yellow onion, diced
1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
1/4 cup freshly chopped Italian parsley (I didn’t add, but you should)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 pound ground lamb or beef
1 1/2 cups diced sweet and/or hot peppers
1 ounce (about 1 cup unpacked) finely, freshly grated Pecorino cheese, or whatever you’re into
1 cup chicken broth

- Roast eggplant at 400 F. until just barely soft, stuff, and continue baking until very tender.
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Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Cream Puff "Crack Buns"(Choux au Craquelin) – Chef John Goes Hollywood

These gorgeous cream puff "crack buns” were inspired by the Great British Baking Show, which is not only my favorite cooking show, but currently my favorite thing on television. Maybe it's the accent, or because the contestants are all so nice, and actually try to help each other. Or, it could be the fact that when the time is up, and they try to work for a few more seconds, the hosts just politely scold them, instead of immediate disqualification, which is what would happen on our much more uptight American culinary competitions.

It's probably all of the above, plus the fact I always get so many wonderful ideas for videos, with these Choux au Crackelin being a prime example. Like I said in the video, these would be great filled with all kinds of things, but it's hard to beat vanilla bean pastry cream. I'm pretty proud of the recipe we posted a few years ago, and while I enjoy it straight, traditionally it would have some whipped cream folded in to lighten the mixture.

Speaking of favorite things, Boston cream pie is one of my all-time favorite desserts, and this was basically an individually portioned, probably superior version of that. The only thing that would have made this experience any more enjoyable would have been getting that coveted Paul Hollywood handshake. Maybe one day. In the meantime, I really do hope you give these a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for about 6 to 8 Crack Buns:

For the “crack” crust:
3 tablespoons soft butter
1/4 light brown sugar (1 1/2 ounces)
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour (47 grams)
pinch salt

For the choux pastry:
1/2 cup water
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
pinch salt
1/2 cup flour
2 large room temperature eggs
melted dark chocolate, optional

- Put into 450 F. oven, reduce to 350 F., and bake for 30-40 minutes or until browned and fully puffed.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Feta Roast Chicken – Making Chicken Betta with Feta

I really loved everything about this feta roast chicken, as long as I was eating with my eyes closed, and that’s because despite the juicy texture, and wonderful flavor, I had trouble getting past the grainy-looking appearance of the cooked cheese mixture. The good news is, it was mostly an aesthetic issue, and the mouthfeel wasn’t nearly as dry and grainy as it looked. Having said that, the next time I make this I will probably go with a little higher-end sheep’s milk feta which is much softer, and creamier. Speaking of the feta, you may need to add some salt to the mixture, depending how salty the one you use is.

As usual, your roasting time will depend on the size of your chicken, and the feta under the skin will increase the time needed, so check with a thermometer, and shoot for 155-160 F. in the thickest part of the thigh. Surprisingly, even though the feta was only under the breast, the thighs did actually pick up some of the flavor, which is enhanced even further if you create a simple pan sauce from the drippings.

While your chicken is resting, pour off all, some, or none of the fat from the pan, and squeeze in your lemon. Set over medium heat, and use the juice to deglaze the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. You may need/want to add a splash of broth or water, but once hot, and adjusted for seasoning, it’s ready to spoon over your sliced chicken. For an experiment, I thought this was very successful, if not triumphantly so, and I do hope you give it a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for one large whole chicken:
1 large whole chicken
kosher salt, as needed
a few fresh rosemary and oregano sprigs
2 teaspoons olive oil for coating chicken
cayenne to taste
For the feta cheese mixture:
4 ounces feta cheese
3 garlic cloves, crushed
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
zest from one lemon (save juice for pan sauce)
2 teaspoon dried oregano
3 tablespoons olive oil, or enough to make a smooth paste
salt to taste

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Roasted Lemon Pepper Potatoes – The Side Dish That Doesn’t Play Second Fiddle

If you’ve made and loved our Greek Lemon Chicken, and Fondant Potatoes, then you will absolutely adore these lemon pepper potatoes, since it’s basically the best of those two recipes put together, minus the chicken. The only problem is, whatever main course you decide to go with is in serious danger of being upstaged.

Speaking of chicken, if you happen to be roasting one, besides keeping the bones for stock, be sure to save the rendered fat as well, since that will elevate this dish to even greater heights. Also, feel free to add some garlic here, but if you do, I’d go with whole cloves, since minced garlic may burn onto the bottom of the dish towards the end of the roasting time.

These are incredible eaten hot and fresh, but if for some reason you don’t finish them all, they make the best homefries you’ll ever eat. Just cut them up, and fry in some olive oil until crispy. They’re so good, you’ll be tempted to make them just for that purpose, although that will take way more willpower than I possess. Regardless, I really do hope you give these Lemon Pepper Potatoes a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 8 Portions Lemon Pepper Potatoes:
4 large russet potatoes
salt, freshly ground black pepper and cayenne to taste
1/4 cup olive oil, or enough to cover bottom of baking dish
fresh oregano springs, optional
1 cup chicken broth
2 teaspoons lemon zest
juice from 1 or 2 lemons
- Roast at 400 F. for 20 minutes, flip and cook another 15 min., then flip again, and continue roasting until very tender and crusty.

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Apple Butter – Everything Apple Sauce Wishes It Could Be

Sure this apple butter recipe takes many hours to cook, but the recipe is quite easy (after you slice 5 pounds of apples), and once done, you have what is basically a spreadable apple pie filling, only better. Buttered toast sold separately. And, that’s just the beginning of what you can do with this miraculous mixture.

It’s perfect used as a garnish for cheese plates, especially alongside some nice sharp cheddar, or spread on some cheesy biscuits, which I believe we posted a recipe for last year. Other approved uses include spreading between the layers of a spice cake, filling seasonably appropriate thumbprint cookies, or even as a condiment for pork chops. Sorry, apple sauce.

This is quite a simple procedure using a slow cooker as seen herein, but if you don’t have one you can certainly do it on top of the stove over low heat, as long as you use a nice thick-bottomed pot, and stir often. Another option would be to place the mixture in a large roasting pan, and cook it in a slow oven, stirring occasionally until dark and thick.

No matter what method used to cook this, your house will smell amazing, as in they wish they could make scented candles that smell even close to this good. So, for those reasons and more I really do hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for about 4 cups of Apple Butter:
5 pounds Granny Smith, cored, sliced
1 1/2 cups white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
splash of water, about 1/2 cup

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Tuscan Fish Stew – Just Like I Barely Remember Having in Italy

I spent a few days in Florence about 30 years ago, and while I don’t remember much, I do recall a few things that surprised me, with this Tuscan Fish Stew being the most delicious. I’d had similar stews before that, but what I found so interesting was how herbs like oregano, sage, and rosemary, which I considered “meat only” seasonings were also used with seafood. The other surprises were the partial nudity on TV and in magazines, but that’s another blog post.

Anyway, it was quite the epiphany, since at the time, being fresh out of culinary school, I thought parsley, dill, and maybe tarragon were the only herbs we cooks were allowed to use for fish. Now that seems ridiculous, but at the time it was pretty heady stuff. Speaking of which, you do need to be careful, since these more resinous herbs can easily overpower a delicate dish.

As I said in the video, any tomato product will work in this, but I really like cherry tomatoes here, since they provide a fragrant freshness you just won’t get with a can or jar. You do need to strain them after blending, but the few extra minutes of work will be well worth the effort.

By the way, I hear that for this to qualify as an official Italian fish stew you need use at least five different types of seafood, which is both insane and adorable, but I thought I’d mention it just in case any old-school Tuscans are coming over. Regardless, I really do hope you give this easy and delicious fish stew a try soon. Enjoy! 


Ingredients for 2 large portions:
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 sliced green onions
4 cloves sliced garlic
1 anchovy fillet
pinch of red pepper flakes
3 cups cherry tomatoes, blended with 1 cup of clam juice, or chicken broth
12 ounces halibut or other white fish
1 pound peeled, deveined shrimp or other seafood
salt to taste
2 tablespoons freshly chopped Italian herbs (basil, parsley, oregano, and pinch of rosemary)
crusty bread for soaking up the broth

Saturday, September 1, 2018

My Big Fat Greek Salad and Its Big Fat Unoriginal Name

I had a feeling I wasn’t the first person to think of this cinematic play on words, but like I said in the video, so many other people called this a big fat Greek salad, I figured I wouldn’t get in too much trouble. If I had to guess, it was probably the caterer on the set of the movie who first coined the name, or at least I hope so.

This is such a simple salad that there’s no need for me to share a bunch of tips and tricks, although I will reiterate the most important instruction of all.  Be sure to toss the salad with the vinegar first, before adding the olive oil. If you don’t, it will not taste as good. Which reminds me, giving the amounts here is very difficult, since this really should be made to your tastes, so please use the ingredient list below as a very rough outline.

If you need to make this the day before, I suggest making the dressing separate, and then mixing everything before the event.  I think this should only be dressed about 30 to 60 minutes before service for maximum enjoyment, but that’s just my approach, and some folks prefer an overnight marination. Regardless of how long you let your ingredients “marry,” you’re going to be enjoying one amazing salad, which is why I really do hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 1 Big Fat Greek Salad:
2 large English cucumbers
2 cups halved cherry tomatoes
1/4 red onion, thinly sliced
1/2 red bell pepper, diced
1 cup sliced olives
2 tablespoons minced fresh oregano, or 1/2 teaspoon of dried
salt, freshly ground black pepper, cayenne to taste
1/4 cup red wine vinegar, or to taste
1/3 cup olive oil, or to taste
4 to 6 ounces feta cheese

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Cabbage Patch Halibut – Come On, Use Your Head

Don’t worry; this cabbage-wrapped fish recipe has nothing to do with those creepy dolls. I just thought “cabbage patch halibut” sounded a little more enticing that the other names I was considering. 

Although, anything with the word cabbage in it isn’t going to have people’s mouths watering, which is how we got “coleslaw.” Despite all that, this really is one of easiest, and most delicious ways you can cook fish. 

The leaf not only keeps the halibut moist, but also holds all your assorted garnishes and seasonings tight against the meat, which creates an even more intensely flavored final result. Just be sure to save the rest of the head, since once chilled, and sliced thin, it makes for a very interesting salad. Or simply slice it thickly, and fry it up with a few sausages.  

This technique should work no matter what fish and ingredients are used, but you may have to adjust the cooking time. The type, size and shape of your fish filet are all variables that affect how long this is going to take. Best to check with a thermometer, and I generally go to for something between 130-135 F. for halibut, but other fish have different target temps, so do some research.

One last tip is to make sure you cut your other ingredients nice and thin, so they’re able to cook during the relatively short roasting time. Other than that, you are only constrained by your imagination. So, whether you put your own twist on this or not, I really do hope you give it a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 2 Portions of Cabbage Patch Halibut:
2 teaspoons butter for the pan
2 boneless, skinless halibut filets (about 7 ounces each)
salt and cayenne to taste
2 large steamed cabbage leaves
1 tablespoon thinly sliced fresh ginger
1 Fresno chili pepper, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons sliced green onions
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
fresh cilantro leaves to garnish
2 tablespoons miso butter (2 tablespoons butter mixed with 1 or 2 teaspoons of white miso, or to taste)