Monday, April 9, 2012

Cottage Fries – America’s Forgotten Fry and Most Delicious Roofing

While they don’t get the same love as French fries, home fries, or steak fries, cottage fries more than hold their own against their potato side dish fraternity bothers. 

And, unlike their French cousins, these easy cottage fries actually crisp up quite nicely in the oven, and as I described in the video, resemble fat, succulent potato chips. I don’t know about you, but to me there’s nothing about “fat, succulent potato chip” that doesn’t sound good.

They’re called cottage fries because they supposedly look like the shingled roofs on those cute little houses you see in the movies and on travel brochures. Appearances aside, I find serving and eating something associated with “cottages” to be just a little more relaxing and civilized than other less vacation-y potatoes.

I used Yukon gold potatoes, which as you’ll see, worked fine, but I do prefer the slightly starchier russet. I would avoid any of the red varieties, as they have a much waxier texture, and don’t get as crusty as other types.

I also used a silicon mat to cook mine on, but you’ll get even crispier edges if you use foil, or put the sliced potato directly on a non-stick baking sheet. Of course, the seasoning options are only limited by your imagination and self-control.

I love Herbes de Provence in this, but literally any fresh or dried herb will work here. Keep in mind, these chips are great just seasoned with olive oil, salt, and pepper, so you’re cooking from a position of power – don’t try and do too much. I hope you give these great change-of-pace “fries” a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients:
russet potatoes, sliced into 3/8-inch thick rounds (about 4-oz per portion)
enough olive oil to coat
cayenne, salt, pepper, and dried herbs to taste

View the complete recipe

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Cayenne .. no kidding. (LOL) Love you to pieces Chef and I'm only poking you about cayenne because I put it almost everything too.

Nicole said...

Hello Chef John I have been watching your videos for sometime and I'd like to say your an inspiration .
Id like to thank you ,you make me want to beautiful dishes .

Michael said...

i have a question: if the starchier russet is preferred, why rinse the potatoes in water to remove starch?

Chef John said...

I believe internal starch is ok, but the oil is said to be best applied to a rinsed, dried surface for the best crust. Not sure of the science, but maybe alton brown did an episode on it. ;)

Viacheslav Bogomazov said...

That's what i did today, thank you! :)
http://bogomazon.blogspot.com/2012/04/blog-post_09.html

Cindy Soo said...

Chef John, I watch you all the time... I asked you once what kind of salt you used because I think it looks beautiful. You must have thought I was crazy or something. I am truly serious. I live in Canada and it is not easy to get beautiful salt. So I was hoping the next time I visit I might be able to pick up some of the kind you use. See not so crazy after all! :)

Mikkel F. Lerche said...

These seem lovely. Will you be doing a demo on pommes anna anytime soon? :)

inchrisin said...

I love this recipe, John. It brings back memories of my Dad frying these things up in the skillet. I've found that if you do them in a skillet that a day-old baked potato works really well. I just add one or two extra to the oven on meatloaf night. :)

Austin said...

Cool!!! Now I can make fries in a little over an hour. I know what I'll be doing with all that pesky free time I had on my hands.

Madonnad said...

I love that you rinse the starch off of your potatoes. I hate that taste of an unrinsed potato. When a potato is not rinsed it reminds me of those cafeteria days.

Matt said...

Jut rinse the potato under water, dont worry about dirt on the skin... damn people are worried about nothing. Theyve been cleaned before they even get to you. I do this with paprika and garlic, sometime some onion, it is well nice. The garlic burn, but it doesnt stick.

Anonymous said...

Why save the cooling rack until the end? Wouldn't it work better or faster if you had them on the cooling rack from the start?

Anonymous said...

There goes my low carb diet...

Festizzeo said...

You need to have some of these in a white bread sandwich with a shitload of butter, two fried eggs, some bacon and some really well done mushrooms.
Yes. I am a fat bastard.

Daniel said...

Hi Chef!

I have just tried these cottage fries and they are delicious!

I have cut the slices in half (so they would stand for themselves in my baking sheet, leaving me even less work to do) and I have also prepared some carrots and some beetroots using the same technique.

I'll eventually post the results (and some photos) on my blog (giving you the due credits), but it may take some time

see ya!

Annette said...

I'm a little confused. You said that you would usually use russet potatoes and those are starchier... and then you rinsed off the starch from these golden yukon potatoes... so why are russet potatoes better for this recipe? Just tryin' to make sense of it, that's all :D. I also noticed that you transferred these to a wire rack for the last ten minutes of baking... why didn't you just bake them on a wire rack the whole time? Would they be too burnt if you did that?

Chef John said...

I already answered 1st question above. I started on pan so the potatoes could sit and "fry" in the oil.

Vincent said...

I know a band that's having some name issues (It's been everything from "Blaze" to "Rockin' Horse") and are still looking for a vocalist. How's your singing and how are the San Fransisco - Amsterdam flights?


@ Anette
It's not that surprising someone brought that up. It is rather counter intuitive to use starchy potatoes, then rinse it off. What you're actually doing is washing the starch out of the damaged cells near the cuts (I'm guessing a layer a few thousandth of an inch). The extra starch in the slice stays there. If don't you rinse them off, the starch near the surface makes browning and crisping them up more difficult (somehow).
Well, that's what I think happens. I'm by no means an expert (I've had the equivalent of a B for biology in my last year of high school), but I'm fairly capable at deducing stuff.

Anonymous said...

Couldn't I start with a sliced boiled or par-boiled potato instead of raw?

Hollis K. Lee said...

Chef J,

I prepared these for dinner along with your 20 cloves of garlic roasted chicken ( I only used 12-15) but it was ALL fantastic.

Many thanks

Grandma Brenda said...

You, Chef John, are a cooking angel! I go straight to your site for cooking ideas and before I make up the grocery list. I was trying to use up the potatoes and thought to try this one and see if anyone liked it.

My picky toddlers asked for seconds and thirds. Everyone asks me to make these anytime I get out the potatoes. What a great and easy way to make potatoes!

Anonymous said...

chef, is there any chance that i can deep fry these? don't have an oven sorry