Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Pork Osso Buco – Keeping it Real without Veal

I’ve never shared the same love for veal osso buco that most of my fellow Italian food fans profess, and it’s been the source of a fair amount of introspection. Was there something wrong with me? It’s a sticky, succulent shank, braised until fork tender; what’s not to like? Then I made it with pork, and figured it out.

It comes out too good with the veal shank. Because of their massive quantities of connective tissue, the sauce veal shanks produce is rich, sticky, and sweet; which I personally find overpowering. It’s great for a few bites, but then I’m over it, quickly. On the other hand, pork shank isn’t quite as rich, and gelatinous, and I personally enjoy it much better.  

For some of the same reasons, I don’t generally reduce the sauce too much. It’s not supposed to be a very thick sauce, and I’m generally happy to get to the coats-the-back-of-a-spoon stage. Anyway, whether you use veal or pork, I hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 6 portions:
six thick-cut pork shank sections
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
1 large yellow onion, diced
1 large carrot, diced
2 ribs celery, diced
1/4 cup tomato paste
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup white wine
2 cups chicken broth
1 bay leaf
1/8 teaspoon ground clove, or *one whole clove
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried Rosemary
freshly chopped Italian parsley and freshly grated lemon zest for the tops

* if using whole clove, tie in some cheese cloth, along with the bay leaf and other herbs to create a “bouquet garni.”

15 comments:

Nick N said...

Chef John what is your opinion on (electric) pressure cookers? I'm thinking about buying one . This seems like a recipe that would work in a pressure cooker. Of course start with start with browning in sauté mode.

Roberto said...

Doesn't gremolata at least deserve a passing mention?

I gotta' try this as an alternative to classic osso buco for the same reasons I usually make saltimbocca with pork rather than veal. Thanks for the inspiration.

Kennapop3 said...

Great Idea, Osso Buco is not an expensive meal to purchase at a good Italian restaurant. but for the most part veal shanks are high priced when I go to look for them. This recipe will increase my home cooking repertoire. Thanks Chef John.

Kennapop3 said...

Just what I wanted to find, and as always you give us a great lesson. Thanks

mateo Sanunga said...

I'm a college student and really want to make this but i cant get the white wine, is it okay to substitute another cup of chicken broth instead ?

LynnieBNC said...

This sounds intriguing, though I love "real" osso buco! I have been cooking for a VERY long time, and have never seen a pork shank! At least not in my average grocery store! I assume I'll need a specialty butcher? Will try it for sure if I can find the cut! Veal shanks are pretty pricey!
Lynn

LuisaCA said...

Good with turkey thighs too.

Coral lunamaui said...

Could i finish it ina crock pot on low?

alex mentes said...

I'm surprised that there are no comments. Anywho, if you want the luscious succulence of the collegen in beef, simply add a little powdered unflavored gelatin.

mom of chef said...

I don't eat Pork. Are there Beef Shanks I can use?

Jim Dowell said...

Chef John, do you ever use non stick pans/pots? I almost always see you working in cast iron or stainless steel. Thanks!

Jennipher Barbee said...

Hope that pork bone hole was delicious! Also, what kind of cookware do you currently use?

Wishbone said...

You make some cheap bones into a above average dinner..

PhillyBear said...

I do believe that I shall call this Bone Hole for the rest of my life!

Dolly Sundstrom said...

...Or for those of us thrifty cooks, buy a big can of tomato paste from Cash and Carry, and put a 1/2 Cup of tomato paste into ziplock baggies, and put the baggies into a gallon freezer bag. Put the freezer bag of tomato paste baggies in the freezer, and take one out at a time.

If you must squeeze, just cut the tip off the baggy; just as easy to open the baggy and spoon out.

Savings? Lots!

EN-joy!