Friday, June 20, 2014

Yuba Noodle Salad – Do You Believe in Miracles?

So many things are touted as “miracle foods” these days, but invariably you find out the claims were false, the benefits exaggerated, and that Dr. Oz was full of crap again. I sure hope that doesn’t turn out to be the case with these grain-free, gluten-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-cal, and quite delicious, yuba noodles.

You can use any dressings/garnishes you like, but I prefer these flavors, since texturally this closely resembles those wide, flat, Asian-style noodles we’ve all picked up from the neighborhood take-out place. Of course, those come loaded with massive amounts of bad carbs, a million calories, and enough MSG to choke a panda.

Occasionally, I have no problem with that, especially if I’ve been drinking, but generally this is a smarter option. Believe it or not, one giant portion of these noodles (not counting your dressing or sauce) only has 150 calories, just 7 grams of carbs, and almost no fat. So what’s the catch? It’s tofu.

But like pasta and noodles, tofu skin is very bland, so it’s really more about the texture, and being a “starchy” base for other ingredients, including non-vegan things like grilled chicken or shrimp. If you keep that in mind, I think you’ll really enjoy experimenting with this incredibly cool product. I hope you try this soon. Enjoy!


For 2 large portions Yuba Noodle Salad:
5 oz package yuba tofu skins, sliced into noodles
handful of carrot shavings
handful of thinly sliced cabbage
1/2 cup freshly torn cilantro leaves
1/4 sliced green onions
black sesame seeds

For the dressing (makes about 1 cup, about enough for 2 large salads):
2 tbsp smooth peanut butter
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp fresh, finely grated ginger
1 tsp sambal chili sauce (or any hot ground chili sauce)
1/3 cup warm rice wine vinegar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil

20 comments:

Judy said...

Since you asked--honey is not VEGAN, at it comes from an animal. They don't consume any animal products at all.

Myztique said...

Looks awesome! I can't wait to try it,




1

bdwilcox said...

You are the Grand Poobah of your Yuba.

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

I wish it were available around here, but I've ordered some very expensive product from amazon....
They serve a "gourmet tofu" dish at our local Pad Thai which has yuba noodles rolled up as part of the dish and I love this texture...I know I would love the salad, too.

labiner said...

Help! I can't find it anywhere. Where can I buy some yuba online?

OneGamersOdyssey said...

Could I heat this yuba for pasta replacement? If so, what is the best way? Thanks so much Chef John!

OneGamersOdyssey said...

Can I heat yuba to be a pasta replacement? If so, what's the best cooking method? Thanks so much Chef John!

Chef Chow said...

Chef John. You are too funny! Love the blog. Quick question. Can you give us like a ballpark estimate of how many views each of your posts get. I just want to feel some insignificance and unworthiness to take me off this little pedestal I've been putting myself on lately. Fire away.

TBG said...

FYI honey comes from an insect not an animal. Anyway, it seems health studies are always being challenged and changed. What I do, I look to see how long something has been used. If humans have been using it for a long time, I am comfortable with it. Food should not only suffice your survival needs but should taste good and be of high quality. Just my two cents. Keep up the good work Chef!

joymama said...

Could a wide rice noodle work? I have a soy allergy (although fermented soy sauce is fine)developed after following a vegan diet for several years.

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

I'm not a vegan but I do know that bees are classified under Animalia.They are animals.

Chef John said...

Not sure about online, but I got mine at Whole Foods!

Yes, I've tried hot, just fried in a pan with a little oil, and then sauced.

Chef John said...

Sorry, can't give out stats, but it's massive.

TBG said...

My point is bees are classified as insects. However, technically they are animals too. So we're both right.

Ultra.High.Fidelity said...

We've made this recipe TWICE in the past week now, and can confirm it is every bit as delicious as it looks. One caveat: the first time around we found the dressing to be WAY too oily. The second time we reversed the amounts of oil and vinegar (so more rice vinegar, less oil) which worked out much better for us. Can't speak for others, but we were able to find Yuba without a problem at our local neighborhood asian food store.

rancholyn said...

Curious...I've been using Shirataki noodles for years...How do these compare to them? Thanks for sharing...

Chef John said...

Sorry, I've never heard of those!

Skyjackie737 said...

Looking forward to making this, but it sounds like I wont be able to find the Yuba noodles :(
keep your fingers crossed. And thanks again for another great recipe

Elena Dere said...

Thanks for another amazing recipe!
Do you have any suggestions to replace the peanuts included in the dressing/ sauce? My father has a peanut allergy and I know he really loves yuba.

Heather Broell said...

Hi!
One commenter asked if yuba (tofu skin) is the same as shirttail noodles. The answer is no. Shirataki noodles have yam flour in them. They would, however, work great for the person with soy allergies. Tofu skin is actually made by simmering soy milk until a skin forms on the surface. This is skimmed off and used in all sorts of applications. And yes, you can make it yourself. Just Google "how to make yuba". One more suggestion for the soy allergy: mung bean noodle. You can buy em dry at Asian markets, and I get the flat, wide noodles. They're absolute heaven in cold noodle dishes. :)