Saturday, October 29, 2016

How to Make Fancy Crackers – Also Know as Crispy Rosemary Sea Salt Flatbreads

Making your own “fancy” crackers at home is a fairly basic operation, and not only will they be less expensive, but you can customize them anyway you want. Whether those reasons are good enough is for you to decide, but if they are, your efforts will be rewarded… with crackers just as good as the ones from the store.

As I mentioned in the video, there are two types of “crackers;” the crispy, delicate, flaky, biscuit-style; and the flatbread-style we’re making here. These are much more like a fried pita chip, than a saltine, which is perfect for pairing with cheese. There’s nothing worse than trying to cheese a too-brittle cracker, three drinks in, and having it explode in your hand.

The recipe and technique are very simple, but please pay attention to your baking time. My “12-15 minutes,” is just a rough guess, and it will depend on the thickness of your dough. I would start checking at 10 minutes, and go from there. Other than that, not much can go wrong. With prime cheese and cracker season upon us, I really hope you give these a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for about 48-60 crackers, depending on the size
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup cold water
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary

- Bake at 400 F. for 12-15 minutes, or until browned and crisp.

14 comments:

Ava Ethan said...

This is perfect! I was just regretting a cracker purchase from last 3 days.


Friend cheese cubes

J Hancock said...

Thanks for the ideas as always. Do you have a sub for the parm? I was thinking tofu, flax mix, or coconut oil. I want to make these vegan. Thank you!!!

FlowerLady Lorraine said...

These really look good and I have some fresh rosemary growing also. :-)

Happy Fall and thank you for sharing so much goodness here.

FlowerLady

Unknown said...

I've made a similar recipe, but I appreciate the video. A method I figured out is to roll out the dough on a piece of parchment, then slice it into little pieces, then move the whole sheet of parchment onto a cookie sheet and bake it that way. This eliminates the need to handle each individual cracker before baking.

Chris K. said...

Would you please share the name of the cheese you demoed this with? It looks freakin' amazing.

Would a pasta roller on the widest settings over-work the dough? If not, I'm thinking it would be a good technique for nice, neat squares.

Steve Lovich said...

Chef John,
Really enjoy the videos and your wry sense of humor. This is probably a rookie question which applies to your butternut squash soup recipe.
When I' m adding salt to finish what am I tasting for? Do I keep adding until It just starts to taste a little salty or am I trying to enhance other flavors and if I taste salt have I gone too far?
Thank You
Steve

Mark Ellison said...

Chef I think you want the title to be "Also Known as" Love your vids btw!

Scaipthe said...

Dear Chef, can you please specify the name of that italian creamy cheese? Looks absolutely delicious.

Thank you!

Jason Smith said...

Ok....Definitely needed cracked black pepper.

Was slightly apprehensive concerning rosemary. Happily proven wrong, again! (wife rolls eyes in the background)

HOWEVER! I used a REDICULOUSLY expensive finishing salt (will not divulge brand as to not receive snarky, condescending remarks).

Yea....this cracker was worthy of a great dip. Well done, Sir!

Walker Schwartz said...

Would any problems arise from making the dough a day before baking?

fluffy said...

I made a couple of batches of these for a party a week ago and they were a HUGE HIT. One batch was rosemary, the other was thyme and fennel seed.

Right now I'm experimenting with different flour mixes and doing a 2:1 wheat:rye flour ratio, and adding rosemary and caraway seeds. I'm expecting good things from them!

Charlie Goddard Jr. said...

I was looking up what Chef John said in the video (letter? letieur?) and it appears the cheese is La Tur cheese from Piedmont Italy. A quick search will bring up some buying options. I know I was curious so I figured I'd include it here for the other people asking!

Scaipthe said...

Grazie mille, Charlie Goddard Jr. ๐Ÿ˜€

Sarah B. said...

I so appreciate your recipes. One thing, though: I'm not an expert, so my grated cheese volume is not standards. Can you give us the weight or starting amount? Thanks for reading this.