Friday, August 19, 2016

Paper Pork Shoulder – It’s a Wrap

This “paper pork” was inspired by a technique for smoking beef brisket that involves wrapping the meat in parchment paper after a certain point in the cooking process, in an effort to keep the meat moist, and succulent. Turns out it works great for pork shoulder.

I decided to try it for an oven-roasted pork shoulder, wrapping it from the beginning, and it came out so perfectly tender, and juicy, I’ve been doing it that way ever since. Like I said in video, I’m not exactly sure how much better this comes out with the paper, verses just wrapping tightly in foil, but it seems to stay moister, and more importantly, it looks cool on the table.

We don’t get any kind of crust using this method, but it doesn’t lack for flavor, and if you’re going to use this for pulled pork sandwiches, along with your favorite bbq sauce, I don’t see how that’s going to be any kind of a problem.

Speaking of barbecue sauce, I’m going to show you an unusual one next week, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, I really hope you give this paper pork a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients:
7 pound bone-in pork shoulder roast
for the rub:
2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tbsp smoked paprika
2 teaspoons onion powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon cayenne
- Wrap and roast at 225 F. for 1.75 hours per pound

41 comments:

EKM said...

G'day Chef John. Could you offer any comment about how best to reheat the pulled pork for a sandwich the next day? Or, might it be better to eat it cold if it's no longer hot from the oven rather than reheating?

Hal Grotke said...

That looks like a lot of food for you and Michille. When you demonstrate cooking a large quantity like this what do you do with all that food?

Unknown said...

Could you put this in a crock pot?

Raul Maia said...

Hey John! Do you know any recipes for spicy brown mustard? The ones I tried were a little underwhelming. Seeing this recipe made me wonder since some spicy brown mustard would be great on that sandwich.

Cheers from Brazil!

John Todd said...

Fantastic!

Chef John; I have a few briskets in the deep freezer. Would this recipe work for brisket?

Thanks!
-John

Anthony Vaiana said...

Chef I love this recipe! I always have weekend gatherings at my house and this is prefect! Quick question, if I didn't want to use all the alcohol you use could I use something else? Thanks again!

Pyrofish said...

The meat needs to be wrapped, or the cooking the environment kept moist, to reduce the evaporative cooling effect. As the moisture evaporates, it stops the meat from reaching above a certain temperature. So you get what you call a "BBQ stall" in the cooking temp. The stalled out cooking process, which unfortunately occurs before the temp needed to break down connective tissue and collagen, only ends when enough moisture has been removed from the meat that the evaporative cooling can longer offset the heat coming in to the meat. Meaning, once it dries out, the temp goes up to where you want it. So the Texas cheat, wrapping it in foil, keeps the moisture in after a known temperature, which stops the evaporative cooling effect. This allows the meat to reach proper temperatures for connective tissue/collagen breakdown, AND retain the moisture that makes it so darned good.

I read about a demo using sponges to show the effect. 2 digital thermo's, a wet sponge in the open, and a wet sponge wrapped once the stall was witnessed. They replicated the BBQ Stall exactly, and verified the Texas Cheat as a fine way to keep moisture in the meat.

SpeedRacer105 said...

How does this compare to using a slow cooker? Also, you forgot to include the brown sugar in the ingredients.

bjatduke said...

Brown Sugar is not listed in the Ingredients list.
Love your show!

Steve O. said...

Brown sugar is missing from list of ingredients. Love you chef John!

jorsh said...

Looks good. You left the brown sugar off the written recipe.

msteff said...

Definitely going to try this...looks so good! How much brown sugar goes into the rub?

crb said...

Do you think this might work well for a (beef) chuck roast? Would the same cooking time apply? The chuck roast sitting in my freezer has been giving me a guilt trip for not making use of it yet...

Total Home supply said...

Do you think this would work in a crockpot or is the oven better?

Denis said...

Hey, Chef John. Thank you for an early Friday posting. I always look forward to see what's cooking. This recipe and technique looks great! In the video brown sugar was add (maybe 1Tbs.) to the spice rub but not included
in the list of ingredients. Is it too later to add to your recipe? My wife is going to go crazy for this Paper Pork.
As always, you are the GREATEST!

Unknown said...

If your guests know YOU...they know you went in for a bite no matter how well you think you hid the evidence. Hahahahaha!

Chris K. said...

I know lots of people don't have a tienda (Latin market) nearby, but if you do, buy some banana leaves and use them instead of the parchment paper. You won't get as good a seal as the paper, but the foil will take care of that. You'll be glad you did.

Another idea: blast the cooked, unwrapped roast in a high heat oven (like 500F) to crisp up the exterior. Or maybe use a blowtorch. I love that juicy/crusty contrast in roasted pork and this is a pretty decent compromise.

Robert Kosior said...

I was wondering. Would this exact method be able to be used with brisket? The reason I ask is because I smoke pork shoulder AND beef brisket with completely identical methods (they're both awesome!) and I'm curious to know if most cooking methods are transferable between both brisket and pork butt.

Abid Bhatti said...

Amazingly delicious!

flyer27 said...

I made this fabulous Chef John recipe tonight with two tweaks. First, I brined the pork shoulder in a 6% salt solution with 3/4 cup of molasses for 12 hours. Second, I slathered Plochman's Yellow Mustard over the meat prior to applying the dry rub to make it stick better. Both ideas I got from Alton Brown.

The pork turned out fabulous. Thanks Chef John for another awesome recipe!

Jeff the Patio Chef said...

Great video John. The paper is a great idea to help keep the meat moist as it cooks. I make something like this using banana leaves instead of paper. It's called Cochinita Pibil and originates from the Yucatan where it means "Pig Buried". They wrap the pig in banana leaves and then bury it in a pit with hot coals and stones. Of course I didn't want to dig a pit so I came up with this kind of method and cooked it in my kamado instead. Most excellent.

Sandy said...

When I saw this, I knew I had to try it. No question, 100 percent worth getting up at 4:30 am to put it in the oven. (I went back to sleep afterwards, of course.) So tender and moist and succulent and perfect. Chef John, you knocked it out of the park again!

Roberto said...

Next time try your sandwich Memphis style with a big spoonful of finely chopped coleslaw on top of the chopped meat. Yummy.

Dustin said...

I just bought a 14lb pork shoulder from Costco. Will it be okay to cook for 24.5 hours straight? Or should I cut it into two separate pieces and cook at different times?

VideoJames said...

Another great idea Chef, but a question for you. I want to do this with a 3-inch think chuck beef slab. Do you suggest the same spices or something else? Thanks!

Кирилл Адеев said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
rodentraiser said...

Interesting technique. I think I'll try this with boneless skinless chicken breasts and see what happens.

Thanks, Chef John!

Jonathan Hughes said...

@EKM I always reheat something that was slow cooked slowly. Put the meat in a pot under low heat with the lid on stirring occasionally until its warm enough for your taste. I also save the juices and add them into the pot to help keep the meat moist and flavorful.

Jonathan Hughes said...

@Rodentraiser This technique will not work well on something without a good amount of collagen. I think boneless skinless breasts would dry out and have an undesirable texture. If you want to use chicken I would suggest using Chicken thighs, drumsticks, or a whole chicken.

Nick Semenza said...

This technique sounds great. I have a recipe for Puerco Pebil where I cut up the pork prior to cooking and it's a pain in the tuchas. When I saw you pull out the bone after your pork was cooked, the light bulb went on. Thanks :). BTW, I'm doing your recipe too, but not until it cools off outside and I can run the oven again without heating up the house.

McShine said...

Thanks for yet another recipe that I couldn't wait to try out! However, my results weren't quite perfect and I'd really appreciate your advice on how to improve it next time.

I didn't really want to make a huge portion like you did, so I went for a 2.5 pounds piece of boneless pork shoulder instead, which was a lot easier to acquire anyway.

According to your formula, the recommended cooking time would have been 4.5 hours, but since that seemed a bit short to me and I thought I'd probably need to compensate for the missing bone, I went for a whole 5 hours, then let the meat rest for an hour, as instructed.

Upon unwrapping, I immediately noticed that the meat wasn't falling apart as yours was, in fact, it still seemed fairly firm. I had never made anything like this before, so I didn't really know if I had cooked it too long or maybe not long enough, so I decided to just roll with what I had, and started tearing strips off of the meat, which was still manegeable, although it was hard work at stages. Some pieces I ended up just chopping.

All in all, the meat still came out really tasty, tender and juicy, but the texture was more like that of a perfectly cooked pork roast than that melt-in-your-mouth tenderness that pulled pork is supposed to have.
I'm pretty sure I should have cooked the meat much longer, but I really don't know how long exactly. The meat would have been just perfect were it supposed to be a pork roast, cooked to a perfect pink in the center and unbelievably juicy, but it wasn't quite pulled pork.

It's probably difficult to judge just from my descriptions, but what amount of time do you suggest I use for a boneless shoulder of this size next time?

Anyway, sorry for rambling so much, but I'd really appreciate your advice!
Thanks as always for your great videos, you've taught me more about cooking than any other book or website! Keep up the great work!

Greetings from Germany :)

Melody Johnston said...

Chef John, I made this last night and it turned out wonderful. The meat was so moist and tender. Definitely trying this with a chuck roast. Thank you!

Sharon Ray said...

Could I use this method with a shoulder of lamb, sort of like a Kleftiko?

Noah Barasch said...

I did this with a 10lb bone in shoulder overnight for about 13hrs of total cooking time. Bone came right out as promised. I used the pan drippings (w/ fat skimmed off) to help reheat later that night in a slow cooker. It was a hit.

I definitely recommend over doing it on dry rub. And next time I'm considering removing the parchment/foil at the end and blast heating it for the last run of time to get a crispy outside.

Mark Herrmann said...

In reference to Raul's question:
I have a great Mustard recipe that is my pastry' chef's grandmother's creole mustard recipe from Baton Rouge. We modified it to be more "dijiony" and it is great. You have to let it ferment for at least 4-5 days but boy is it worth the wait!!
Better than anything you can buy in stores. Message me some how and I can send you the recipe and help modify it to brown mustard. Even though I live in New Orleans, I am from Charlotte, NC, so you know I know what's up with thee BBQ scene in North Carolina!

Kathryn Vandenberk said...

Made this with a 3.5# pork shoulder. Needed more time, probably because there was too much wrapping. Delicious anyway. Boiled the leftover pork the next day with a little white wine until it fell apart.
Mixed your vinegar sauce with bottled BBQ sauce and it was great. It cut the sweetness. Wonderful recipe that we'll make again!

Daniel Grjonko said...

kathryn, about how much longer would you have cooked that 3.5 pound piece? I'm thinking of starting in an hour or so!

Michael said...

Any suggestions on time/temp if using a boneless butt? Thanks!

AOnot said...

Thank you, Chef John for providing the perfect solution for me at exactly the right time! I'm testing out this method today on a beef brisket that is going to be made up into medieval meat pies. I used a mixture of medieval spices in my dry rub and then used this technique to pre-cook the brisket (which was common in the medieval period -- usually roasting on open flame via spit turning) before mincing it finely and mixing it with other ingredients for the pie filling. Pies are in the oven now and looking great.

I can tell you that the beef itself came out beautifully done using this technique; nice and moist and full of flavour. I especially like that this method holds the spice rub on the meat, but unlike traditional braising, doesn't require huge amounts of extra liquid. There is also zero worrying about the meat getting dry or needing to be turned etc. Awesome stuff!

Josieinmo said...

Chef John,

We used this technique for our first try at pork butt on the Big Green Egg. We cooked two butts uncovered at 350 deg. for three hours. We then took them off the grill, wrapped them in parchment paper and then foil and put them back on at same temp until the pork had internal tem of 205. (About two hours). We then put them in a cooler, still wrapped for an hour. When we unwrapped, the bone came out cleanly and the pork was moist and flavorful but still had a good bark. Great pulled pork and in 6 hours rather than the standard 11 or 12. We are calling this "the California Crutch" Thanks for sharing this (and your recipe for avgolemono soup which I make just about every other week) I have always cooked pork butt in the oven using a recipe from Emerill Lagasse for Cuban sandwiches but I am going to give this method a try next time we do Cubans.

Nikica Spasovski said...

Chef John, I just made a 8 lbs shoulder using your method and it was amazing. Slipped right of the bone. Best meal I’ve ever had. Extremely soft and juicy. You have the praises from the entire family. Thank you good ser.