Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Roasted Apple and Parsnip Soup – A Creamy Lesson in Seasoning

Besides being a delicious and comforting winter meal, this roasted apple and parsnip soup is great for honing your seasoning skills. With its mild, earthy, slightly sweet, gently aromatic flavor, it’s the perfect vehicle for tasting the effects of salt on food.

As I mentioned in the video, most “bad” soups are the result of under-seasoning. Nothing makes me sadder than reading an online recipe review, where someone is complaining that a soup recipe was too bland. Hey, Captain “Two Stars,” did ya' ever think about putting a little more salt in?

When you make this, salt the vegetables when you roast them, but then wait until the soup is done before adding any more. Once the soup is finished, and you’ve achieved your desired texture, then taste and add salt, a pinch at a time. As you do, take a minute in between samples, along with a sip of water, and you’ll really notice how small additions of salt amplify the flavors. Continue until it sings.

Speaking of seasoning, one reason I chose blue cheese croutons for the garnish was their sharp, salty finish, and it was a beautiful combination. I look forward to showing you how to make those in the next video. Stay tuned for that, and in the meantime, I hope you give this delicious roasted apple and parsnip soup try soon.  Enjoy!


Ingredients for 6 Portions:
2 lbs parsnips, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch sticks
2 green apples, peeled, cut in thick slices
Note: a diced yellow onion could be added to the roasted vegetables. I didn’t want this too sweet, so I tried without one, and it was amazing, but I'll try the next batch with that addition.
2 tbsp olive oil
salt to taste
1 russet potato, peeled, cut in 8 pieces
6 cups chicken broth (or combo with water)
1/2 cup heavy cream
pinch of cayenne
- Garnish with croutons, crumbled blue cheese, and chives

20 comments:

bobrogue said...

Parsnip slip!! You've outdone yourself on that one, Chef.
Bravo!

Kyle Young said...

Couldn't hold off with the Dwight Schrute reference for some kind of beet recipe?

Sam Elizondo said...

Chef, I know this may not be the best place, But I'm a huge fan of your cooking. I would love for you to make a Rib roast with the bone in. Maybe in a cast iron or something like that.

Joe Hyatt said...

I thought you were a New Yorker!?
Why did I think that

Michael Mitchell said...

I made this today was really great, even if I do have to change everything to metric...

Chef John said...

better you than me! ;)

sdgf said...

Dear Chef, why dont you also roast them potatoes !? thx LiNUS

Daniel Callis said...

I can't help but wonder why you didn't roast the potato along with the parsnips and apples.

Chef John said...

There were a few reasons why I did not roast the potato. The potato was just to thicken the soup and help improve the texture, I didnt want to bring out extra potato flavor. Also we would've had a roast that much longer before the potato would start to caramelize and have any effect. The reason for the roasting was to bring out the natural sugars in the parsnips and apple since that was the main flavor profile of the soup. But, good question!

rancholyn said...

This truly looks amazing...I'm thinking of serving this as an appetizer for a dinner party next week;
1) How many days in advance may I cook it? (I'll garnish before serving).
2) How rich is soup?
Main course will be some sort of chicken dish...
Thanks

Chef John said...

You could make a day or two ahead! I can't answer No. 2. too subjective.

SpeedRacer105 said...

How much of the anise flavor comes through? I can't stand the taste of licorice.

John Wikberg said...

Thanks Chef, this made a delicious and comforting Sunday lunch, perfect after a stormy night here in Sweden.

sofie dingemans said...

Tout à fait délicieux! QUICK. Creamy, earthy, sweet and naturally perfumed. The roasted onion gave it a little extra "zang". Merci Chef John.
I ate it with a thick slice of home made squash bread and it was a meal all together. Reeeeealy rich.

Karen said...

Ah! So adding cayenne can help bring out other flavours! A basis for contrasts? I thought you use it routinely only to add heat (and maybe some flecks of colour.) Always learning something new from you, Chef!

rancholyn said...

This was absolutely fab! Not one of my guests guessed parsnip..the croutons are THE BEST. Only problem....No leftovers...

Faleczka said...

Can confirm that this recipe works also as a roasted apple and parsley soup. Also, my advice - read the recipe, don't go by sight.

Shayontee said...

Dear Chef John,

Big Big Fan of you, have always been! I recently moved to Germany from US and have to carry around a mini converter with me always to follow your recipe or mostly I just improvise! (I guess that is your point anyway, right?)

I substituted 2 green apples with 2 small green ones and a pear!! Turned out delish! The flavors are great together! My boyfriend always compliments my cooking but secretly he knows whom to thank! Thanks for it all, and ENJOY!

Lady Hawk said...

This soup is DELISH! I added the onion per your note. I had some pears...kinda wish I'd used one. I'm sure that would pair well. The croutons are super tasty. I could sit and eat these like popcorn :).

I've only recently discovered your videos. I'll definitely try more of your dishes. Thanks!

suchadreamer said...

I made this today.... And omg, it was sooooo freakin delicious. I had to change to a red potato and greek yogurt because that is what I had, but it didn't hurt it any. The onion doesn't make it too sweet, either.