Friday, April 22, 2016

Kumquat Marmalade – Beautiful, Delicious, and Almost Easy to Make

If you’re like me, and marmalade is not your favorite type of fruit preserve, it’s most likely because of those bitter flavors from the white parts of whatever type of citrus was used. That is not an issue with this gorgeous kumquat marmalade.

The secret here is using a type of citrus that doesn’t really have any of those pithy parts, which is why kumquats are the only citrus I know of that you eat whole, skin and all. If you are going to enjoy au naturel, make sure you roll them first, to release all that sweet, fragrant oil.

However, if you’re going to cut them up as seem herein, then rolling each one is not necessary, as the oils will be release as we quarter, seed, and slice. This is a good thing, as we need all the time-savings we can get, since what we are going to do, is painstakingly remove the center white membrane.

I believe this will make your marmalade even less bitter, but mostly it’s for appearance. For me, those little white bits spoil the perfect, clear-orange jelly that’s produced. But if you think I’m crazy, and you want to save a half-hour, you can probably skip that step, as long as you get all the seeds. I really hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for about 2 cups:
2 generous cups sliced kumquats (measure after they have been quartered, seeded, and sliced into small pieces)
zest and juice of 1 lemon
small pinch cayenne
1 cup white sugar
1 cup cold water
1 star anise (I remove after 10 minutes of simmering)
- Note: You can just go by appearance, but I took the temperature right before it was done, and it was bout 215 F., so I imagine when I was finished it was around 220 F. You can also put a spoonful on a plate in the fridge, and test that way.

20 comments:

Joe Eoj said...

RIP Prince

tommihommi1 said...

What amount of whole kumquats did you use? 200g? 500g?

kinjun ranger said...

I've never tried a Kumquat, but may have to with this one. Looks delicious.

Thanks Chef John, (again).

AJK 67 said...

I wonder how this would be as a base for a glaze on pork or chicken......

Robin Betts said...

Would it be ok to mention the 'fingernail test' here? Put a drop of the syrup on a cold plate, let it cool, and push a fingernail through it. If you get a distinct wrinkle in the surface, and the gap stays open for a while, you've got a good set for your marmalade or jam.

Unknown said...

Thanks for the recipe. It turned out great :D

rodentraiser said...

Could I make sauce for orange chicken from this?

Jason Smith said...

This beat Seville oranges...hands down!

Karen said...

My family has access to loquats. Do you know how those would work in this recipe instead of kumquats?

Jason said...

This is exactly the type of marmalade I grew up on in Northern California. My grandmother lived in Scotia, and made it with Loquat. I loved the jam but hated when she made it because my brother and I being the only grandkids would get wrangled into doing the seeding. Loquats have much bigger seeds than Kumquats but I think Loquats taste a bit sweeter and less bitter than Kumquats.

Dr. Dabney said...

I never knew (or thought) to roll them before eating! I can't wait to get home and try it out! Thanks John!

Jim said...

What does "generous" mean? 2 1/2 cups? Does it not make a difference so you don't have to be exact?

sequimteeth said...

Spectacular color! What a wonderful recipe. I have preserved kumquats and gifted them to friends at Chinese New Year. They are a great fruit.

Will that recipe process for long term storage?

Keith said...

Here in Louisiana our kumquats are always ripe and ready in mid-winter. I got too busy to even think about picking mine until today, April 27th. With Chef John's recipe I just made the best marmalade ever. A fat two cups of chopped kumquats made two half-pint jars of finished marmalade. Great EASY recipe. It's a keeper. Thanks Chef John!!!

Nise said...

Two years ago a friend gave me a couple of gallons of kumquats. Making marmalade took me most of an afternoon and I processed the jars and gave some away as gifts. Next time I will use star anise, which is a great idea, thanks! I have used the marmalade in a sauce for pork chops, stirred it into softened butter for cranberry scones, used it in a ham glaze, and added it stir fries. From one passionate cook to another, thanks, Chef John!

Laura H said...

Made it yesterday! Wonderful! Thanks for the recipe!

Theo said...

Hello Chef John,

this marmalade recipe worked out fantastic for me, i am searching for a wile now for a corn flags recipe just like the basic Kelloggs corn flags we buy at the store making them at home from the scratch so if you one day feel like making home made corn flags you would make our day :-)
Greetings from Greece

Larry D'Anna said...

This is the best marmalade I've ever tasted. Wow. So good.

Ben Ernst said...

made this recipe today but came out extremely bitter barley edible anyone know why?

Jennifer Hitz said...

This looks fabulous. Is it a recipe that I would be able to can? If so, how long would I process the jars? I was thinking 10 minutes.