Friday, April 27, 2018

Scottish Oatcakes – The Pancake, Not the Paperweight

If you Google, “Scottish Oatcakes,” you’ll see lots of pictures of what looks like thick, dense, pressed oatmeal cookies, which is the most common version of this recipe. To be honest, I’m not a huge fan of those, since they tend to be very heavy, and filling, and not really something I want to feature as the centerpiece for a fancy brunch menu.

However, there is another pancake-like version, and this is my twist on that. I should’ve probably come up with my own, more appropriate name, but I really love saying “Scottish Oatcakes,” and it just sounds like something you’d want to eat for breakfast.

Once you mix up your batter, you can cook it right away, which produces something that looks identical to what we have here, except the texture will be much more toothsome. I do enjoy that approach, but if you let the mixture sit for a while, the oats continue to soften, resulting in a creamier center. I’ve also let this go overnight, which will give you a texture very similar to actual oatmeal. 

Regardless, you’re still going to get a beautifully browned, crusty exterior; and it’s that contrast that makes this so unique. Some people like to add dried fruit to these, but I do not. The same goes for the traditional pinch of cinnamon, since I really don’t want these to taste like oatmeal raisin cookies. As usual, suit yourself, but either way, I really do hope you give these great oatmeal pancakes a try soon. Enjoy!



Ingredients for 6 Scottish Oatcakes:
(this is only 2 portions, so feel free to double or triple the recipe)
1 cups *rolled oats
1 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon lemon zest
2 teaspoons lemon juice
1 large egg
1 teaspoon honey
1/4 teaspoon fine salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 cup **self-rising flour
1/4 cup melted butter for panfrying

* I used the regular kind, but if you have to use the instant ones, I probably wouldn’t cook them. I’d just mix them with the cream, and let it sit until the mixture thickened up. By the way, this is just a theory, as I’ve never attempted.

** If you don’t have self-rising flour, just add 1/4 cup of all-purpose flour, plus 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder, and an extra pinch of salt.

13 comments:

Unknown said...

What about throwing in some steel cut oats as well for another dimension of texture?

I suspect the baking soda in the self rising flour is helpful in reducing he acidity enough to enable good browning.

Unknown said...

If I wanted to try this recipe with steel cut oats instead of rolled oats, how long would I cook them?

ArciCola said...

These look soooooo good! Will have to try this recipe out next weekend!
Also, I have a food wish! Octopus. I've always wanted to try and make Octopus at home but am too intimidated to try. Would love a video showing a recipe and technique on cooking octopus.

Mary W said...

I can't wait to try this recipe. I love real oatmeal. Fifty years or so ago, Quaker cme out with a 'golden oats' version of oatmeal for a savory side. You brown the rolled oats in butter, then added liquid, then cooked in same pan until done. I tried it and it was really good. Don't have the recipe anymore but thought you may have heard of it. They had a little pamphlet with several golden oat recipes that was free for the asking. If you know anything, would love to see your twist on it. I think I will try your oat cakes with dried cranberries and pecans inside, also. Looks so good.

Katherine Aguilar said...

I'm pretty sure I'm going to love these but was wondering if I could substitute the flower to make them gluten free. Thank you for your great recepies and humor.

Nancy Friedberg said...

wish you would submit this to the allrecipes site. their print function is pretty helpful.

Susan Hammitt said...

can you use steel cut oats?

Unknown said...

Am on Weight Watchers, it is going well and the reason I like it is because I can eat anything in moderation. That being said, I wonder how the recipe would work with regular old milk, like a 2%. Would the recipe need changing at all due to the lessened fat? I would like this for Mother's Day!

Victoria said...

These taste exactly how you want them to! So delicious. I didn’t even wait for the mixture to cool down all the way and it still worked. They look amazing too, and browned great in the butter. Very filling, I needed a smaller portion than I usually eat in pancakes. Just a delicious breakfast! Thanks CJ

Kenny Graziani said...

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Charlene said...

Unknown, I use whole milk for the recipe and it turns out fine. I’m sure 2% would work too.

The only issue I had was that we have three grades of rolled oats. If you use quick oats (as opposed to instant - they’re different here) it helps to let the oat mixture rest overnight in the fridge.

Also, for one serving use 2/3 cup of oats and milk, 1 egg yolk or 1 egg white, and 2 slightly heaping tbsp flour. I used oat flour and it turned out fine.

Ed Leonard said...

Got rave reviews on the recipe! Used 1 cup of oats soaked in 1 cup of buttermilk overnight.

Thomas Bernecky said...

Mom made them and they were great, but I misread the recipe card and called them CatCakes for 15 years or so.